jayles the unwoven

Joined: June 3, 2014

Number of comments posted: 34

Number of votes received: 10

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

Are proverbs dying?

subwait

Recent Comments

Re: subwait  •  July 21, 2014, 8:45pm  •  0 vote

@AnWulf The surgery in question used to be a couple of doctors in a rather homely converted detached house; now they have merged with others into a new clinic with a largish reception area and a fair

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 20, 2014, 10:18pm  •  0 vote

@WW "If I repeat the point about usage, it is because this is one of the few language forums where this is not considered important." Where is your evidence for this? ;=)) Sadly many normal,

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 20, 2014, 9:23pm  •  0 vote

sic transeunt populi anglici linguae gloriae

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 20, 2014, 9:11pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper Perhaps the root of the problem in English lies in the word roots: http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=this&searchmode=none http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_f

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 20, 2014, 8:30pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper Not sure I can help you here; in truth I am not very academic. However FWIW in German ( and up till William the Bastard et al came to stay English was germanic) one would say something like:

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 19, 2014, 3:49pm  •  1 vote

@Jasper I must confess that thick as I am, I am still not entirely lucid on what exactly you are trying to clarify and why this is so important to you. Is it just that you wish these sentences to fit

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 18, 2014, 7:33pm  •  1 vote

@Jasper To my mind, there is a difference in the usage of "am" in the following: A) Who am I to judge? B) Whom am I to judge? In A "am" is a true copula. In B "am" is a sort of modal auxil

Re: When did contacting someone become reaching out?  •  July 18, 2014, 3:15pm  •  3 votes

@HS Thank you for reaching out to us in your hour of need. As you now know, we operate an outreach program for those whom the modern vernacular has left feeling bewildered, betrayed and benighted.

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 18, 2014, 4:26am  •  1 vote

There is a list of copula verbs here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_English_copulae Right now I cannot see how to follow any of these with a complement and then an infinitive. It is pe

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 17, 2014, 2:38pm  •  1 vote

Victoria: I am to be queen then? Lord Melbourne: Yes, you are, ma'am. Victoria: And who is Prince Albert to be? Who is he to be? Lord Melbourne: He is in no way to be KIng, ma'am. Victoria: Well

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 17, 2014, 2:37am  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=It+is+me+who+*&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2CIt%20is%20me%20who%20*%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3BIt%20is%20me%20who

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 17, 2014, 2:37am  •  1 vote

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=It+is+me+who+*&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2CIt%20is%20me%20who%20*%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3BIt%20is%20me%20wh

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 16, 2014, 8:24pm  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=It+is+me+who+has%2Cit+is+me+who+have%2CIt+is+I+who+have%2CIt+is+I+who+has&case_insensitive=on&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&di

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 16, 2014, 8:22pm  •  1 vote

@Jasper In my days we were taught that the complement is in the nominative case, and that "who" takes on the person of its antecedent; thus "It is I who am ....". Influenced by Latinate grammarians I

Re: subwait  •  July 12, 2014, 2:36pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf the subwait area is often just a few chairs in the corridor outside the doctor's room, like a forward waiting area, which saves the doctor wasting time trudging back to reception to find the n

Re: subwait  •  July 12, 2014, 12:27am  •  0 vote

@Anwulf I must own up - when I first saw 'sub-wait' I thought 'No, you cannot meld latin prefixes with Germanic roots'. But perhaps the true ask here is what else can you come up with in its stead?

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  July 6, 2014, 7:03pm  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=over+till+the+fat+lady%2CNothing+is+set+in+stone&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cover%20till%20the%20fat%20la

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  July 2, 2014, 8:53pm  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=two+wrongs+do+not+make%2Cmightier+than+the+sword%2CWhen+in+Rome%2CThe+squeaky+wheel%2Cthe+tough+get+going%2CNo+man+is+an+island%2CFortune+favors+the+bold%2

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  July 2, 2014, 8:53pm  •  0 vote

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=two+wrongs+do+not+make%2Cmightier+than+the+sword%2CWhen+in+Rome%2CThe+squeaky+wheel%2Cthe+tough+get+going%2CNo+man+is+an+island%2CFortune+favors+the+bold%

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  July 2, 2014, 8:52pm  •  0 vote

Thank you. I had been looking at "the 50 most important proverbs" http://www.phrasemix.com/collections/the-50-most-important-english-proverbs and wondering how they came up with the list.

Re: Putative (-ly) vs. Supposed (-ly) vs. Ostensible (-y)  •  June 28, 2014, 7:42pm  •  0 vote

At common law there is a presumption that the husband is the father of a child born during the course of a marriage. (Maybe one in twenty-five aren't, so ask your mum!) That's why "putative" is the

Re: Putative (-ly) vs. Supposed (-ly) vs. Ostensible (-y)  •  June 26, 2014, 12:38am  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=supposed+origin%2C+supposed+power%2Cputative+*&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Csupposed%20origin%3B%2Cc0%3B.t

Re: subwait  •  June 25, 2014, 7:42pm  •  0 vote

@WW yes it hadn't quite dawned on me how ubiquitous 'sub' has become with words like "subway" and "sublet". It is indeed no longer just a Latin prefix, but an English one too, sometimes meaning 'under

Re: Use my brain or brains?  •  June 17, 2014, 9:42pm  •  0 vote

Male brains are of course about 10% larger than female brains. Notably, male brains contain about 6.5 times more gray matter than women. Female brains have more than 9.5 times as much white matter, T

Re: Use my brain or brains?  •  June 17, 2014, 12:35am  •  1 vote

I thought "brains" in the plural tends to mean something like "intellectual capability" whereas "brain" might suggest the physical literal organ. Check out the specifically plural connotations: htt

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  June 13, 2014, 3:59pm  •  0 vote

@WW Would the same outcome apply for AmE eg Red Sox, San Francisco 49ers ,Miami Heat ??

Re: that vs. if and whether  •  June 12, 2014, 7:16pm  •  0 vote

Economy comes from Greek for houselhold management cf "oikos" meaning a house which survives as wick, wic, wich in placenames like Chiswick, Norwich, Highwic.

Re: When is “of course” impolite?  •  June 7, 2014, 4:02pm  •  0 vote

@WW Interesting that you say "cheeky" for (b). ESOL students sometimes use "of course" in this way with no intention of being cheeky. I guess in some way it is payback for the implicit-in-the-questi

Re: When is “of course” impolite?  •  June 7, 2014, 3:32pm  •  0 vote

From the following book moly.hu/konyvek/susan-doughty-geoff-thompson-problem-english-a-practical-guide-for-hungarian-learners-of-english "Of course: this is perfectly acceptable as a polite respon

Re: Meaningless Use of “key”  •  June 4, 2014, 9:26pm  •  0 vote

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=that+is+key+.%2Cthat+was+key+.&case_insensitive=on&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t4%3B%2Cthat%20is%20key%20.%3B%2Cc

Re: Use of multiple periods  •  June 4, 2014, 7:50pm  •  0 vote

@WW Of course.

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  June 4, 2014, 6:19am  •  0 vote

Jasper Of course you may do as you wish; it is indeed difficult to talk of "standard" English when discussing "thou" and "thee", and modern usage in dialects is pretty non-conformist. I tend to see

Re: Use of multiple periods  •  June 3, 2014, 11:54pm  •  0 vote

Tone Some people may use them to express annoyance or irony; others might use them because "no problem" by itself feels too abrupt. Only real way to find out is to ask them... (I put them h

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  June 3, 2014, 11:41pm  •  0 vote

Jasper The 's' ending on the third person overtook '-th' in the late middle ages; either is possible , but '-th' is definitely archaic, and not in modern use. My take on it would be that usin