Funslinger

Joined: May 10, 2014  (email not validated)

Number of comments posted: 6

Number of votes received: 0

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Recent Comments

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 14, 2014, 12:24pm  •  0 vote

by Warsaw Will "The crowd are on their feet" - Yes, it's the members of the crowd who are their feet - "is on its feet" would sound quite weird to me here. How many feet does a crowd have? @Warsaw

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 14, 2014, 12:16pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will “United are playing well” makes no sense to me. If I were implying that the players as separate entities were all playing well, I'd say “The United players are playing well”. When I am r

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 11, 2014, 10:43pm  •  0 vote

Even though my previous example of “My staff disagree about my next course of action” could be considered correct with the plural verb, it is still more appropriate to say “The members of my staff dis

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 11, 2014, 10:20pm  •  0 vote

The plural verb with a single group is becoming very prevalent now in the United States as well. Sigh. As to United States, it is not a plural. The uncapitalized term of “united states” is plural,

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 11, 2014, 10:16pm  •  0 vote

http://painintheenglish.com/case/60/#comment-25579 @Warsaw Will If you wish, you can refer to the vast number of people in the organization rather than the organization. Then a plural verb is appr

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 10, 2014, 6:23pm  •  0 vote

http://painintheenglish.com/case/60/#comment-9132 Well, I find it ludicrous that Europeans tend to use plural verbs with singular nouns. As in, “Ford Motor Company have layed off more employees.”