Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Proofreading Service - Pain in the English
Proofreading Service - Pain in the English

Your Pain Is Our Pleasure

24-Hour Proofreading Service—We proofread your Google Docs or Microsoft Word files. We hate grammatical errors with passion. Learn More

Username

Skeeter Lewis

Member Since

March 16, 2012

Total number of comments

163

Total number of votes received

95

Bio

Latest Comments

I'm more concerned about your last sentence: 'How serious is it to mandate that my international include this comma?'

Keep from catching it

  • June 4, 2015, 5:18am

It's American idiom. I've never heard it in England.

'Nervous of performing' sounds right to my ear.

issue as problem

  • January 11, 2015, 10:41am

I rather like the saying, "If you've got an issue, get a tissue."

3 Laning?

  • December 11, 2014, 8:06am

Hairy - you're absolutely right: 'three laning' is indeed ugly.

Evolution of Exactly the Same

  • November 17, 2014, 3:36pm

@vwmoll
Welcome to the forum. If you care about the language, you'll fit in seamlessly. Yes - you're absolutely right - we can get tetchy from time to time. You'll get used to it.
Skeet

Evolution of Exactly the Same

  • October 31, 2014, 2:53pm

I wonder if the Duke meant 'same exact' in the modern sense. Possible he meant that the Order was 'exact', that is, neat and soldierly, just as on exercise.

What’s happening to the Passive?

  • September 24, 2014, 4:00pm

WAIT HERE UNTIL RED LIGHT SHOWS.
Shows what?

Why ‘an’ in front of an ‘h’-word?

  • September 22, 2014, 3:37pm

Saying aN Historic is an absurdity. Until comparatively recently, it was correct not to aspirate such words as hotel. That is why in older novels, one tends to see 'an hotel'. It was, of course, pronounced, by duke and dustman alike, 'an 'otel'.

What’s happening to the Passive?

  • July 31, 2014, 3:18am

@Jayles. "Interest rates increased." Good example. Clever old interest rates.
It leaves one wondering where the rest of the sentence is. I don't mind the passive in moderation so long as it is a true passive, not this strange form that obeys no rule of logic.

Oddly, in my previous post I was about to do the same thing myself. I nearly wrote, "The sentences should read this way." Sentences don't read. People do.

Questions

Medicine or Medication? October 27, 2012
What’s happening to the Passive? July 30, 2014
The 1900s June 11, 2015