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Skeeter Lewis

Joined: March 16, 2012
Comments posted: 163
Votes received: 72

Questions Submitted

The 1900s

June 11, 2015

Medicine or Medication?

October 27, 2012

Recent Comments

Bugger.
'I've only ever seen that in Detroit' suggests that I may have heard it...but never seen it.

Skeeter Lewis June 24, 2014, 2:40am

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Has the 'only' drifted into the wrong place?
I've only ever seen that in Detroit.
I've seen that only in Detroit. (Ever being dropped)

'I've only ever seen that in Detroit' suggests that I may have seen it...but never heard it.

Skeeter Lewis June 24, 2014, 2:38am

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In English English slang a chrome dome is a baldy.

Skeeter Lewis June 24, 2014, 2:11am

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My generation still calls it The Ivory Coast but 'the' has been dropped.

Skeeter Lewis June 23, 2014, 3:08am

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Will - thanks for your post. I think that the sort of people who write advertising copy are aware of American slang and tend to pick it up. They just don't get it right.

Skeeter Lewis June 20, 2014, 3:50am

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To me, as a Brit, mechanics has nothing to do with the study of English.

Skeeter Lewis June 16, 2014, 4:24am

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Thanks, jayles. Economy, ecology and ecumenical are all derived from it. The English spellings (oeconomy, oecology and oecumenical) have finally given way to the simpler form, just as the 'ae' in, for example, mediaeval, has been shortened to plain 'e'.
In Britain we keep the spelling 'aesthete', pronounced with a long 'e'. Americans spell it 'esthete' and give it a short 'e'. As with 'Edipus', that sounds odd to me.

Skeeter Lewis June 13, 2014, 4:38am

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Economy, if memory serves, was originally spelled 'oeconomy' and would therefore have had (still does) a long O.
Americans tend to pronounce Oedipus, which they spell Edipus, with a short O, which sounds odd to me.

Skeeter Lewis June 12, 2014, 4:16pm

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It's spelled 'minuscule'. With a U.

Skeeter Lewis June 11, 2014, 3:33pm

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Yes, there's a coterie in the media that gets over-excited by new usages. For example, in the past a writer might say, "Anne was only eighteen." Now, it has to be, "Anne was just eighteen." To me, that means she's had her birthday recently.

Skeeter Lewis June 4, 2014, 2:57am

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Dots should be used sparingly. When I turn a page and see a swarm of dots, my heart sinks. It looks like amateur day.

Skeeter Lewis June 4, 2014, 2:49am

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Key is a buzzword that irritates me too. Much over-used.

Skeeter Lewis June 3, 2014, 3:06pm

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Thanks, Will. I think it's another instance of Brits misunderstanding American idiom and getting it bass-ackward.
Skeet

Skeeter Lewis June 3, 2014, 2:55pm

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As a Brit, I'd just say, "on top".

Skeeter Lewis May 27, 2014, 4:01pm

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I think the term for this nowadays is 'hypercorrection'.

Skeeter Lewis May 27, 2014, 4:00pm

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I notice Tesco using the line, 'Better than half price'. 'Better than' in this sense is an Americanism that (I think) always means 'more than' not 'less than'.
Perhaps Americans will chime in and tell us if I'm talking rubbish or Tesco is.

Skeeter Lewis May 27, 2014, 7:40am

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In general, clearly, foreign singulars and plurals are retained when a word is newly introduced but in time the word is naturalized. Remember, vast swathes of English are foreign words that have been gradually absorbed into the mother tongue.

Skeeter Lewis May 24, 2014, 10:58am

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I'm sorry to hear criteria being used in the singular instead of criterion.
Similarly, 'phenomenon',
Skeet

Skeeter Lewis May 24, 2014, 10:52am

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I confess to being rather fond of the singular of scampi.....'scampo'.
Skeet

Skeeter Lewis May 24, 2014, 10:47am

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I know it's not relevant to this thread, but I like the adjective derived from forum - 'forensic', meaning 'of or pertaining to, or trained to give evidence in, a court of law'.
We tend to use it only of forensic scientists nowadays: they are scientists trained to give evidence in court. But formerly one would speak of a lawyer's 'forensic skills', meaning his skill at cross-examining witnesses. (A forum being a place of debate.)
Skeet

Skeeter Lewis May 23, 2014, 4:44pm

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