Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Fri, 27 Apr 2018 00:11:36 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on thus, therefore and hence are different by Mufeez https://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-27599 Mufeez Thu, 26 Apr 2018 10:34:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4452/#comment-27599 I'm still very weak. I don't know what to so to be better at English.

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Comment on X and S by mcodin79 https://painintheenglish.com/case/550/#comment-27598 mcodin79 Sat, 21 Apr 2018 12:23:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/550/#comment-27598 What if the 's is not a possessive but an elision, like in the contractions of has and is?
Are the following sentences correct?

Alex's got a cold
Max's doing his homework
the ox's running
the ox's finished the hay

Thank you

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by robin1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27597 robin1 Fri, 20 Apr 2018 05:43:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27597 Microsoft Style Guide is your friend.

mouse devices
OR
mice

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Comment on How many thats? by WR https://painintheenglish.com/case/488/#comment-27596 WR Thu, 19 Apr 2018 22:58:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/488/#comment-27596 Teacher critiquing an essay: “I think that that “that that” that that student wrote should’ve been a “which that.”

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Comment on Littler by LiteralRenee https://painintheenglish.com/case/439/#comment-27595 LiteralRenee Thu, 19 Apr 2018 02:11:11 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/439/#comment-27595 No you cannot use littler at all. The correct grammar is smaller. As for the comment in regards to your brother, the correct grammar would be my younger brother instead of smaller if you choose. Hope that helps.

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Comment on Canadian pronunciation of “out and about” by edric https://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-27594 edric Wed, 18 Apr 2018 04:03:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-27594 If the word OUT in Canada is pronounced OAT (as in Quaker Oats) and the word ABOUT is pronounced A BOAT (the thing that floats) I assume other OU words and OW words have the same sound: clout, doubt, gout, lout, shout, tout and also bound, downed, found, hound, mound, pound, round, sound, wound, count, mount and I am not sure what else. The way Canadians pronounce the words HOUSE and MOUSE rhyme with DOSE. I have this question: does the word BOW (as in bowing one's head) sound the same in Canada as the BOW that shoots arrows or tying a ribbon in a BOW?

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Comment on What Rhymes? by Michelle Welsh https://painintheenglish.com/case/1/#comment-27593 Michelle Welsh Sun, 15 Apr 2018 19:40:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1/#comment-27593 My son is in the entertainment field/ hip hop being most of it / editing & stuff. But Did u know ~ that Eminem read the dictionary Every Single Day before he made it ~ so tha he could not only find words that rhymed ~ But☝????Words that Rhymed and made total sense in the Rap? And he uses some lOng Ass words!!! I just found that interesting and wanted to share ~ ????????

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Comment on What Rhymes? by Michelle Welsh https://painintheenglish.com/case/1/#comment-27592 Michelle Welsh Sun, 15 Apr 2018 19:24:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1/#comment-27592 ☝????I beg to differ with you @poetess ~ Silver rhymes w/ Bewilder ????

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Comment on Double Words by Judith Urban https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27591 Judith Urban Fri, 13 Apr 2018 21:44:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27591 How do I locate the "comments" that come back to me? Pain in the English told me that I had three comments, but when I go to your site, there are none. Thanks.

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Comment on Double Words by Judith Urban https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27590 Judith Urban Thu, 12 Apr 2018 07:04:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27590 I hear people both in person and on television using the alleged word "I's." Is there such a word. For example, people might say, "John, Joe's, and I's baseball ticket got lost in the subway." To me, that is just wrong and there is not such word as I's. Am I right?

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Comment on Double Words by Judith Urban https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27589 Judith Urban Thu, 12 Apr 2018 07:02:01 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27589 Thanks so much for your response. However, I was very serious about double words. I find the use of them to be lazy and an avoidance to one's vocabulary-building. The people that I hear using double words are not saying them jokingly or for humor. In other words, instead of asking "Were you elated?", they say, "Were you happy, or were you happy-happy?" I dislike such lazy speech and hope that it does not become acceptable. Besides, it is often quite confusing, such as, "Was he at the gym, or at the gym-gym?" Someone said that to me and I don't know what he or she meant, nor did I feel that I should have to check for clarification. Thanks for your input.

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Comment on Double Words by Vickie https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27588 Vickie Wed, 11 Apr 2018 03:32:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5957/#comment-27588 I would imagine these are all mainly humorous.

Were you happy-happy, or were you just "happy" because you're expected to say so out of politeness?

Was it fixed-fixed, or was it just hardcoded or duct-taped to work for that one use case/scenario?

He’s in his office-office -- this could easily apply to my boss, who is a workaholic. Everywhere is his office, and then we have our real corporate office.

I can't say I see any need for saying "Do you know how to type type", unless most people they have encountered only know how to type with one finger and you're looking for someone who knows how to use all 10.

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Comment on When did contacting someone become reaching out? by OB1NZ https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27587 OB1NZ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 04:31:16 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27587 I am soooo fed up with being "reached out to" instead of being "contacted."
It is so false when an email arrives with phrases like "You reached out to us" or "I reached out to you."
First I received such phrases in emails from USA but now New Zealand seems to have cottoned-on to it too! It drives me batty!!

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Comment on you all by asanga https://painintheenglish.com/case/361/#comment-27584 asanga Tue, 3 Apr 2018 11:58:38 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/361/#comment-27584 Does the word "You" actually require a different plural form? If you think of the practical usage of it, to address a group or an audience "You" is just sufficient, isn't it? Because, if you want to call one or a few specific people of that audience, you would rather use his/her name or a phrase such as "you, sir/madam". Otherwise, it naturally addresses the entire audience/group when you just use "You". If you think of the natural cognitive impulse that a common person (without being region specific) would get when his group being called with "You all"; it is more like issuing a command (not that polite) isn't it?

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Comment on “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive by amyKatsis https://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-27583 amyKatsis Mon, 2 Apr 2018 15:17:12 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-27583 When saying two things are ready for pickup... is this correct
Your and your sons tax returns are ready for pickup

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27582 Hairy Scot Mon, 2 Apr 2018 07:13:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27582 Visit pedants-corner.freeforums.net

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Comment on Is it A or An? by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27581 Hairy Scot Mon, 2 Apr 2018 07:12:34 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27581 Visit pedants-corner.freeforums.net

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27580 Hairy Scot Mon, 2 Apr 2018 07:11:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27580 Visit pedants-corner.freeforums.net

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Comment on Is it A or An? by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27579 Hairy Scot Mon, 2 Apr 2018 07:10:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27579 Visit pedants-corner.freeforums.net

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Comment on Is it A or An? by TeresaJo https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27578 TeresaJo Sun, 1 Apr 2018 01:18:42 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/118/#comment-27578 I agree. You would also say he has an MBA because you say the letters, but what about if you aren't sure how the abbreviation will be read by the reader? A M.Div. degree could be said "a masters in divinity" or "an M.Div". Which do you think would be correct? To make it even muddier, I actually have to use both degree abbreviations in one sentence.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Chris Simpson https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27577 Chris Simpson Thu, 29 Mar 2018 14:49:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27577 I cannot find any other origin for the word 'Hey' Where I live in Liverpool we have a famous Children's Hospital called 'Alder Hey' and I was talking to someone about that word. It was suggested that it may have originally been Hay but I seem to remember as a child thinking the word 'Hey' had some meaning associated with the countryside.

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Comment on Someone else’s by Charles De Richelieu https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27576 Charles De Richelieu Thu, 29 Mar 2018 09:03:16 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27576 "Ok genius, good luck"! Bit aggressive isn't it?

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Comment on Idea Vs. Ideal by Patricia Pilioglos https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27575 Patricia Pilioglos Tue, 27 Mar 2018 21:30:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27575 It drives me crazy when people use "ideal" in place of "idea". I want to shake them and say No! It's idea! But I'm kind of a grammar police anyway. My pet peeve is when people do not use the proper They're, their and there in sentences, it is very prevalent in social media. I just want to give grammar lessons but know I'll come off sounding like a snob.

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Comment on A quote within a quote within a quote by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27574 jayles Tue, 27 Mar 2018 00:20:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27574 See:
https://data.grammarbook.com/blog/quotation-marks/quoting-a-question-within-a-question/

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/92163/how-to-punctuate-a-quote-within-a-quote

The trick at the end is to leave a space after the single quotation mark, separating it from the double.

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Comment on A quote within a quote within a quote by Barbara J. https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27573 Barbara J. Sun, 25 Mar 2018 19:05:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5112/#comment-27573 The quotation has a quotation within it that ends at the end of the original quote. I put the original quote in double quotation marks and the within quote in single quotation marks, however, what do I do when I get to the end and it is the end of both the within quote and the main quote?

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by steven4 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27572 steven4 Sun, 18 Mar 2018 20:20:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27572 The reason Legos is wrong is because a Lego is not an thing, it’s a company, but not just in the way the author used it. It’s a company that produces Lego bricks or Lego pieces, the company doesn’t say it makes Legos and never has, that’s an abbreviation someone in the US made. Therefore “I am playing with Lego” or “can I buy some more Lego because I need more pieces” is correct.

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Jackie Clark https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27571 Jackie Clark Sun, 18 Mar 2018 00:30:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27571 Just come across this site as I was taken to task for NOT including stops in eg and wanted to definitively know what's the formal line on this.
[Waaah! EeeeK! Your website wouldn't allow me to write eg. It wanted e.g. !! A subtle ploy to MAKE me do it?]
I have not used stops in dates and abbreviations in years. I agree that it looks cleaner without; the time for old-fashioned flowery style has gone. Even official documents are no longer in this style so we do we need to be? Language, spoken and written evolves. As for saving time: does it? I don't think in this day of fast keyboards that it does but it just looks simpler – and that does it for me.

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Comment on “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve” by Taaya https://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-27570 Taaya Sat, 17 Mar 2018 13:52:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4715/#comment-27570 I stumble over it more and more often, using tumblr. As a non-native speaker it's really annoying. Because we wade into the deep waters of english internet communications to strengthen our language skills. But while I understand that nobody outside of English class speaks Oxford English, I noticed that nowadays it is pretty unlikely to keep your English on an acceptable level for job applications using the internet. Most English and American tumblr bloggers, Goodreads reviewers and Facebook users seem to be worse in writing English than I am. And even though my college ranked me as 'native speaker level' I simply do not understand what they are trying to tell me. While I can communicate with French, Russian and Indian citizens (and mostly Brits as well) in English, especially writing with Americans becomes more and more difficult. Even though I read novels in English and watch most TV shows in original version as well.
So while all those little quirks might seem like natural language evolution to those who use them, they are making it harder to communicate. In a time when English is spoken (or at least written) by almost everyone on the planet and the internet brings us all together, those people segregate themselves again.

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Comment on Newfoundland Expression by Benjimin https://painintheenglish.com/case/307/#comment-27569 Benjimin Sat, 17 Mar 2018 12:20:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/307/#comment-27569 I cook a batch of salt beef 2-3 times a year and make enough to have leftover peas pudding and corned beef hash. The latter is a mix of the leftover meat and vegetables mashed up and fried for breakfast with eggs and bacon, nothing in world like it. ummm. The leftover peas pudding is great cold or hot and good for lunches (nasty side effect though if you get my drift, LOL).
But back to my intended response, the comments on what beef to use.
The salt beef used in "Corned Beef N Garbage" was indeed, salted beef in watery brine, this was a preservative in days gone by. I do not know the cut of the beef but it was low quality and fatty, hence the need to cook it for such a long period. As a boy in St. John's Nfld I remember just about every corner store would have a big wooden barrel full of brine and salt beef. The brine kept it preserved. The store used a big hook to pick out pieces and often the customer would say, not that one, too fatty, etc. There were always complaints about quality LOL. The purchased piece of meat would be weighed and wrapped in paper.
Fast forward to today. You can get salt beef in a few supermarkets but in small pails (4-10 lb sizes). Up until a few years ago most of what I saw in supermarkets was made by Maple Leaf foods but lately there are other brand names, i.e Best Meats.
Yesterday I made a batch of Corned Beef and Cabbage, oops, a Jiggs dinner, and will have leftover corned beef hash for breakfast tomorrow, yeah!!.
What you buy today. I purchased a 4 lb pail ($16.95 cnd), labeled “cured navel beef packed in brine” after cutting off the major fat it yielded less than 2 lbs of fatty raw meat and some with bone in so the meal is no longer an affordable staple meal. This does not seem to be a negative to the brand, it is just what you get these days when you purchase it. I have yet to find a place to buy the salted meat without paying for the brine. Another note, as a boy, the fat was never removed, we burned it off in work and play. Also note the commercial purchased pails now say “keep refrigerated” so I guess the brine is no longer a reliable preservative.
Alternatives. The meat flavor from the salted brine cannot be beat so if you can afford it that is the best way to go. But if you want to increase the meat proportion and keep the cost down a little try adding some pre-packaged “Corn beef brisket”. I say adding because making the meal with just “Corned beef brisket” is good but produces a different meal, not the typical corned beef and cabbage flavour.
This time, I also purchased 2 lbs brisket at $5.4 lb cnd and it yielded no bone and very little fat. I mixed the 2 lbs of brisket with the 2 lbs salt beef from the pail and got a good result. Caveat; wash the brisket really well to get the spices off as much as possible. I like to wash the salt beef but I do not soak it anymore as it is not as salty as it used to be. But that depends on your affinity for salt in your food and the proportion of meat to other vegetables. I use a lot of vegetables to have left overs for corn beef hash. I also cook the meat longer than most suggested 4-5 hours (with peas pudding) adding the vegetables and cabbage at the end.

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Diane R https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27567 Diane R Wed, 14 Mar 2018 17:48:43 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27567 I'm 55 and from Long Island. Ive pronounced it like "ant" my whole life and I refuse to change. And while we're on the subject, i can't stand when people pronounce "anna" as "on a". I mean the two sounds for the letter a is long a as in "acorn" and short a as in "accurate"

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Jelal https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27566 Jelal Mon, 12 Mar 2018 00:40:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27566 Hello all,

I have just read through 12 years of comments lol. It has thoroughly entertained me.

I studied Computer Science at Uni and the lecturer advised the students that the correct term was "mouses". It could have been his own opinion though.

I wish you all the best and thank you for the lovely read.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by S Salah https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27565 S Salah Thu, 8 Mar 2018 10:37:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27565 Surprise!!!! Both are wrong you can't say she or me for the first person. The answer is " Yes that's me".

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27563 jayles Sun, 4 Mar 2018 05:08:27 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27563 Four and seventy-three thousandths per cent ??? (4.073%)

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Sagrario Holbrook https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27562 Sagrario Holbrook Sat, 3 Mar 2018 17:45:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27562 i am stuck on a legal document: how to express "four whole seventy-three thousand percent"

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Comment on “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive by Cheryl Ford https://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-27561 Cheryl Ford Thu, 1 Mar 2018 16:48:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5042/#comment-27561 Now mine and my sons glasses are going to cost me a little over $400

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by Gerald https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27560 Gerald Tue, 27 Feb 2018 19:24:14 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27560 What if you were to recast it as "neither one"? I think "is" sounds more natural there.

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Comment on “reach out” by providencejim https://painintheenglish.com/case/5118/#comment-27559 providencejim Tue, 27 Feb 2018 18:04:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5118/#comment-27559 I hesitate to add yet another annoying example to this discussion, but this one is really so contrary to the original meaning of "reach out" that I cannot resist. Delta Air Lines recently bowed to gun-control advocates (admirably!) and tweeted this announcement: "Delta is reaching out to the NRA to let them know we will be ending their contract for discounted rates through our group travel program."

Yes, and I'm sure the National Rifle Association appreciated this outreach.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by osbert https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27558 osbert Thu, 22 Feb 2018 19:02:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27558 "Me either" makes as much sense as "I could care less", I think both are dull-brained mistakes, possibly originally by a non-native English speaker, then subsequently accepted as good English. "Me neither" is rough, but at least logical: "nor I, either" just isn't heard these days, but "neither am/have I" is commonly heard and logical. Grammar: descriptive rather than prescriptive, but some howlers ought to be laughed out of court.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by osbert https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27557 osbert Thu, 22 Feb 2018 19:01:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27557 "Me either" makes as much sense as "I could care less", I think both are dull-brained mistakes, possibly originally by a non-native English speaker, then subsequently accepted as good English. "Me neither" is rough, but at least logical: "nor I, either" just isn't heard these days, but "neither am/have I" is commonly heard and logical. Grammar: descriptive rather than prescriptive, but some howlers ought to be laughed out of court.

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by mark1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27556 mark1 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 08:41:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27556 LEGO does not refer to the bricks, but to the brand. Therefore, it is incorrect to say LEGOs, as you would be referring to multiple LEGO companies. The only correct way to refer to them is "LEGO bricks."

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by Mr A Gow https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27555 Mr A Gow Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:25:34 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27555 The name "LEGO" is not derived from English language, and therefore it cannot be stated that the very English method of adding an 's' for a plural is definitively correct. In this case I would suggest LEGO pieces (as the company itself requests), especially now that the LEGO brand has diversified into films, video games, and even cake tins. It is worth noting, however, that throughout most of the world the plural of LEGO has always been simply LEGO.

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27554 jayles Wed, 21 Feb 2018 03:18:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27554 On google books "neither are to blame" shows up just nineteen times, whereas "neither is to blame" has over five thousand results.

https://www.google.com/search?biw=1432&bih=955&tbm=bks&ei=seSMWs6CEYa00gS8mpYo&q=%22neither+is+to+blame%22&oq=%22neither+is+to+blame%22&gs_l=psy-ab.3...49546.50825.0.51465.5.5.0.0.0.0.328.637.3-2.2.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..3.0.0....0.6mXbV0-cCT0

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27553 jayles Mon, 19 Feb 2018 09:54:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27553 " neither were significant predictors of the outcome measures"
"they were not working mischief, neither were they doing any great good; "
"neither were most of their members prepared to take part as citizens."
"Things are either what they appear to be: or they neither are, nor appear to be"
"And if the fountains are not gods, neither are the rivers,"
"Neither are we truly portraying what Christ's disciple means. "

Both are possible, depending on the context:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=neither+is%2Cneither+are%2Cneither+was%2Cneither+were&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=18&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cneither%20is%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20are%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20was%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20were%3B%2Cc0

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22neither%20were%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by Edinrin https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27552 Edinrin Sat, 17 Feb 2018 15:42:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27552 'Neither are' is correct
For example: neither are to blame for the damage done.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by Nonyobizz https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27551 Nonyobizz Thu, 15 Feb 2018 23:03:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27551 well, actually, grammar rules themselves don't exist. there has never been any set rules, because the "rules" depend on how a majority decides to speak, and they change as the years go by. "ain't" used to be considered grammatically correct and was used by rich English folk, but when "commoners" started using it, they decided it wasn't proper English. this fact won't change how society treats grammar (like it's friggin LAW), but I feel like we should all be more lax and just use whatever feels right to us. I mean, soon, "I did good on my test" will be considered proper grammar.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Joshua Sattler https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27550 Joshua Sattler Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:18:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27550 It’s a church thing. I’m willing to bet that the people heard saying “on tomorrow” are heavily influenced by the church. Church folk are the people I’ve ever heard say it.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Rajena Andrews https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27549 Rajena Andrews Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:53:15 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27549 There is a male coworker that when ever he speaks to the females in our office always starts with "Heyyy name, how's it going?" Is it just me, i feel it is so disrespectful and annoying. What are your thoughts?

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Monocle https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27548 Monocle Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:06:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27548 The past tense of Text is Text.

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Jesse Wade Atkins https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27547 Jesse Wade Atkins Wed, 14 Feb 2018 22:41:09 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27547 Just hard for me to believe,"texted" would be proper. Just saying ????????????????????

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Comment on gifting vs. giving a gift by marina1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27546 marina1 Wed, 14 Feb 2018 16:12:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27546 I'm so glad to read that others are annoyed at this shift of "gift" to an unnecessary verb!
I am also irritated by the ubiquitous use of " no problem" to every request in the service industry. When was it considered a problem to ask a sales person, or wait person question? It's a double negative. Wouldn't a simple, "happy to help," be more positive?!

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