Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Fri, 20 Jan 2017 03:51:48 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Does a lie have to have intent to deceive? by reversedyske https://painintheenglish.com/case/4779/#comment-27148 reversedyske Thu, 19 Jan 2017 20:37:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4779/#comment-27148 I disagree with Dyske's answer.
In the first example, you are saying something that you know is not true.
In the second example, that is a subjective opinion. They can truly believe they have the best pizza, just like you hear people say they have the greatest wife or kids. It's a subjective opinion that they may truly believe in.
In the third example, that would be a lie because once again you are saying something that is not true even though it's hyperbole.
The way I under the definition of "lie" is that it wouldn't be a lie if I say something I BELIEVE to be true, but is factually wrong. If the police ask me to describe a suspect from memory I could truly believe I'm giving the correct description from memory and be factually wrong, but wasn't my INTENT to deceive the police.

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Comment on Salutations in letters by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27146 Hairy Scot Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:27:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27146 In email to someone familiar, I open with "Hi" and sign off with "Cheers" or "Slàinte mhath". Otherwise I use "Good day" and "Regards".
In letters it's normally "Dear ......" and "Yours sincerely".
I agree that "Yours truly" and "Yours faithfully" now seem to be considered passé.

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Comment on Is it acceptable to say “higher than” when you mean “as high as”? by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27145 Hairy Scot Wed, 18 Jan 2017 01:18:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5734/#comment-27145 How about, "The rent has doubled.", or "The rent is now twice what it was."
Both "two times higher" and "two times as high" sound like phrases used by primary school kids.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Alun Evans https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27144 Alun Evans Tue, 17 Jan 2017 15:57:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27144 Trust me, when you get to my age, mid 60s, you will start complaining when you hear words spoken which you have grown up with all your life, being given totally different meanings and you are supposed to calmly accept these new meanings without having a clue why they have been changed. If someone comes up to me and says hey as a greeting, then for me I am waiting for them to finish. Even when I just hear it in plays or films, it makes me feel very uncomfortable. I'm not writing here to say it's right or wrong just to make folk understand that it can be very unsettling for some of us.

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Comment on Team names — singular or plural by B123456789 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-27143 B123456789 Tue, 17 Jan 2017 05:24:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4394/#comment-27143 The team has access to multiple sources

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Comment on On Tomorrow by JBS https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27142 JBS Mon, 16 Jan 2017 14:22:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27142 This is an old world English term sometimes trapped in areas of Appalachia, like many other old German, Scottish, Irish and English phrases (or variations thereof). It's commonly used among religious African American folks in Georgia and Alabama from my experience. The reason so many comments have referenced NE Georgia, Kentucky, and North Carolina etc.. is the Appalachian connection.

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by Wenban5 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27141 Wenban5 Sun, 15 Jan 2017 16:25:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27141 An extension of solecism?

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Comment on Actress instead of Actor by charmaine https://painintheenglish.com/case/703/#comment-27140 charmaine Sun, 15 Jan 2017 11:11:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/703/#comment-27140 I have long found referring to both male and female thespians as "actors" extremely distasteful, as in PC gone amok. When I waited tables, I had no problem with the term "waitress." Then again, I have no problem with the term "comedienne" for a female comedian. The stewardess/steward thing which is now deemed offensive seems patently absurd to me, but well, "flight attendant" it is! However, reading all the comments with historic connotations does help me make a bit more sense of it all. Personally, I have no problem with the masculine and feminine forms of words/professions, and in fact I do buck against changing all of that, but appreciate the perspectives offered. I totally get that a female MD is not called a doctoress in English, but she would be called "la doctora" in Spanish, and a male "el doctor."

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by John Baxter https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27139 John Baxter Fri, 13 Jan 2017 16:22:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27139 Usually a brand name or a play on words, used in advertising. Like the old pop brand, "Hi Klas" rather than "Hi Class" I want to say what that is called. Would an advertising agency know, I wonder? Or a college course in advertising maybe?

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Michael luna https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27138 Michael luna Wed, 11 Jan 2017 01:16:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27138 I'm Mexican native American from Los Angeles California and I use Ant not aunt but I have heard my cousins say aunt before. Personally I prefer ant.

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by John Eidsmoe https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27137 John Eidsmoe Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:41:15 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27137 In general, the noun/verb distinction is accurate, but not completely so.

If I were a lobbyist, I might say "I advocate lower taxes."

But if the Republican Party retained me (with or without pay) as an advocate for lower taxes, I could say "I am an advocate (noun) for the Republican Party" or "I advocate (verb) for the Republican Party."

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Felicity Leith-Ross https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27136 Felicity Leith-Ross Tue, 10 Jan 2017 04:42:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27136 A mouse is a mouse and mice are mice - whether electronic or furry !

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by Grammar Mammal https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27135 Grammar Mammal Mon, 9 Jan 2017 18:34:20 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27135 To report “there is an accident just prior to the Erindale Rd turn-off” is correct from the perspective of the listener, who judges distances in time as well as linear distance. A driver thinks in terms of duration between landmarks, and may be as likely to consider an exit 2 miles away as 2 minutes away.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Roger Burnell https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27134 Roger Burnell Mon, 9 Jan 2017 12:40:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27134 Sorry to correct Jun-Dai, however "anyways" is not an English word!

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Comment on “You have two choices” by GILL https://painintheenglish.com/case/5198/#comment-27133 GILL Sat, 7 Jan 2017 02:01:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5198/#comment-27133 This drives me bananas. "You have two choices." You can't have one choice. It's not a choice. You have a choice means you have two options. If there are three to choose from, you have three options. Doesn't matter who said it in history or in respectable places. I still roll my eyes when I hear it. Ah trivial... doesn't matter... I should get some sleep...

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Comment on What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling? by suze1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27132 suze1 Fri, 6 Jan 2017 12:25:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/644/#comment-27132 The term for this is 'sensational spelling'
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sensational_spelling

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Comment on obliged or obligated? by Rorritt https://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-27131 Rorritt Wed, 4 Jan 2017 14:10:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1669/#comment-27131 Obligated is simply clumsy grammar - obliged applies wherever both words might apply!

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Comment on anything vs. everything by heavenly- two https://painintheenglish.com/case/4408/#comment-27130 heavenly- two Wed, 4 Jan 2017 04:19:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4408/#comment-27130 why it is not correct to say, it doesn't necessary?

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Comment on “Sic” or “Sick” something on someone? by New Reader https://painintheenglish.com/case/402/#comment-27129 New Reader Wed, 4 Jan 2017 02:46:56 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/402/#comment-27129 The Internet: "an electronic communications network that connects computer networks and organizational computer facilities around the world", is a proper noun and should be capitalized. As a noun, there is no other application of this word, so spelling it using lower case would be inappropriate.

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Comment on “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”? by Curtis Stotlar https://painintheenglish.com/case/4505/#comment-27128 Curtis Stotlar Tue, 3 Jan 2017 13:04:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4505/#comment-27128 The idea of awarding a degree to a high school or college is fascinating. "I graduated college." What degree did it earn from you? Did it graduate with honors? Did the school wear a cap and gown?

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Comment on Feeling concern by Mrs Jane Allwork https://painintheenglish.com/case/923/#comment-27127 Mrs Jane Allwork Sun, 1 Jan 2017 16:14:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/923/#comment-27127 i am concerned about what I been told and can and cannot do. from Social workers from Social services and friends and family and other friends I cannot say for good reason.
marry is been not every healthy and we live together in the same home sepuated bedroom.
met a good friend from my childhood get along every well and wanted to be able to stay in touch and cannot because they family
been in the pubic eye and not all that famous and since not to
matter and known to my family.

I understand it might sound a bit out of the strange to some people why I need to see her and what I want to do with my further plans and nothing gets done because we do not know how to go forward to make it all happen not over ambitous I am affaid and that isn't going to

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Comment on What does “Curb your dog” mean? by Cesar https://painintheenglish.com/case/5235/#comment-27126 Cesar Sun, 25 Dec 2016 10:21:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5235/#comment-27126 Its not confusing at all, it was meant literally "Curb your dog". A person was required by law to walk their dog in the curb (where street meets sidewalk edge). You were not supposed to walk your dog on the sidewalk. That doesn't bother me as much as pet pet owners that assume you don't mind if they walk their pets on your lawn instead of the grassy area by the curb (sidewalk edge). I don't pay a mortgage to have my property used as a toilet for their pets. "Its not ok to walk your pet on my property" You can't pick up urine which kills my grass and you certainly can't pick up soft stool which inbeds itself into the soil and of course the sidewalk; it just smears.

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Comment on Plural form of anonymous by Glen B of Puget Sound https://painintheenglish.com/case/560/#comment-27125 Glen B of Puget Sound Sat, 24 Dec 2016 10:39:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/560/#comment-27125 Ah, there's the rub. If it were "not susceptible to pluralizing" we would not be having this exchange. Mostly I follow the "rules". But as a fan of poets and writers who long have grasped the value of tweaking our language, I now feel confident in my decision to address my indignant letter to certain corporate anonymice.

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by SpeakEnglandverydelicious https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27124 SpeakEnglandverydelicious Thu, 22 Dec 2016 19:40:34 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27124 I wonder if said reporter would use the sentence "When in the passport arrivals queue, it is required to wait prior to the white line"?

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Comment on Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange” by Cathy W. https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27123 Cathy W. Wed, 21 Dec 2016 11:44:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27123 I came across an interesting study done by David Durian at Ohio State:

Getting [ʃ]tronger Every Day?: More on Urbanization and the Socio-geographic Diffusion of (str) in Columbus, OH.

http://repository.upenn.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1004&context=pwpl

I also cringe when I hear this pronunciation. The article helped me better understand its origin. However, even knowing how this came to be doesn't negate my distaste for the pronunciation! Don't even get me started on "try and" vs. "try to"!

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Comment on “make a decision” or “take a decision” by Rick D https://painintheenglish.com/case/4997/#comment-27122 Rick D Tue, 20 Dec 2016 19:32:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4997/#comment-27122 I think several people have hit the nail on the head. I work in a multi-national company, and the use of 'take a decision' by non-native English speakers is so common, that I now use it out of habit. My wife insists that she has never heard it, and was correcting a (company) e-mail that I was writing.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Pita M https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27121 Pita M Mon, 19 Dec 2016 22:19:33 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27121 I looked this up to find out what is correct.
Well, I see that it is contested, but I truly believe it is "This is she" not "This is her." "Her" is like an adjective, describing something.
It grates upon the native ear, as it is said.

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Comment on Origin of the saying “off with their heads” by Namaste Suz https://painintheenglish.com/case/1658/#comment-27120 Namaste Suz Mon, 19 Dec 2016 16:02:57 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1658/#comment-27120 "...have it’s origin..." << REALLY?!?! :-O

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by john williams https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27119 john williams Mon, 19 Dec 2016 10:18:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27119 In Dyske's reply, shouldn't "As a writer, we put ..." be stated as, "As writers, we put..."?

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Comment on Someone else’s by Livia https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27118 Livia Mon, 19 Dec 2016 04:08:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27118 Correct form: passers-by. Why? Because "passer" is a noun and it can be made plural and because passer-by is hyphenated!! "Standoffs" is normal because it is not.
Also, check a reliable, good dictionary: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/passer-by?q=passer

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27117 Brus Watters Sat, 17 Dec 2016 07:59:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27117 The computer 'mouse' resembles the rodent, so plural 'mice' does nicely. 'Mouses' is silly, as is being 'geesed' many times, just 'goosed' many times. What is plain wrong but we hear it increasingly is 'behaviours' meaning 'forms of behaviour', and similar inventions of neologisms by forming plurals from collective nouns which don't bear pluralising. Try 'thinkings' for 'thoughts' as in 'the thinking is, the thinkings are ...' - clearly pretentious silliness meant to sound clever but having the opposite effect on the listener, this one anyway. 'Behaviours' - no! no!

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Comment on my being vs me being by AndrewL https://painintheenglish.com/case/353/#comment-27115 AndrewL Fri, 16 Dec 2016 12:52:14 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/353/#comment-27115 I understand what you say, although I still feel "without me being" sounds fine. But what happens with this?
"without one being warned"

That seems to be correct. Shouldn't it be "without one's being warned", like in "without one's permission"?

What about these?
1a) You can drive with me being your navigator.
1b) You can drive without me being your navigator.
2a) You can drive with my being your navigator.
2b) You can drive without my being your navigator.

I again feel both 1 are correct and 2 sound weird. Thanks!

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Comment on use of “prior” in space vs. time by Anshul https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27114 Anshul Fri, 16 Dec 2016 06:17:30 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5724/#comment-27114 As I think prior' is an adjective of priority which is used in the context of time for example ....you must have prior experience in doing that task.....

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Rt https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27113 Rt Thu, 15 Dec 2016 17:02:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27113 My vote is "mouses" multiples of computer pointing devices.
It clearly tell the reader/listener that you're NOT talking about vermin.

When language borrows a name for a unrelated usage, we should not usurp it unique plural and tenses. If your posterior receives sudden squeeze, you been GOOSED.
Now if happens several times... have you been "Geesed"? I think not.

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Comment on Texted by Judy Kush https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27112 Judy Kush Thu, 15 Dec 2016 14:06:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27112 Good thing I didn't use a texting format does that sound right? It does to me but not sure

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Cincinnatian https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27111 Cincinnatian Thu, 15 Dec 2016 11:11:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27111 Title: "Hi is for Girls"
Hey everybody! Its almost 11 years later from the original post. There was a fellow Cincinnatian who posted how we used it here. Cincinnati is considered the "Gateway to the North" & we have both Northern & Southern influences here.

Hey, to my understanding, started as an exclamation followed by a comment or question. Eg: "Hey! How have you been?" "Hey! Nice to see you!" and then everything else got dropped and we are left with "Hey!" then the exclamation got dropped and so "Hey" came to carry the same meaning as "Hi".

Now here's what I meant by "Hi is for girls". Around here girls use Hi more than guys. Hi is cuter and softer.

If you're male and speaking to another male informally and say "Hi" it might be interpreted as effeminate, old-school or just plain nerdy. Now if the two males are on more formal speaking terms then "Hi" would not be interpreted that way.

So if you don't know someone say "Hi, how are you." If you're meeting with the guys to go out to the gym or a night in the city & you say "hi" then you might be teased unless you've all found the softer sides of yourselves.

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Comment on In actuality, actually by Tammy https://painintheenglish.com/case/1063/#comment-27110 Tammy Wed, 14 Dec 2016 18:42:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1063/#comment-27110 I agree with you.

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Comment on A “homely” home - would you want to live in it? by Brody https://painintheenglish.com/case/1010/#comment-27109 Brody Wed, 14 Dec 2016 05:10:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1010/#comment-27109 Homely in Ireland and the US mean two completely seperate things. They present two completely different images and even feelings or emotions to the listener.

Homely in Ireland is complimentary it conveys down to earth, grounded and stable. Not too fancy.. as in..."the hotel was a homely little place"
It niether means attractive or unattractive, it does not mean ugly but rather something pleasant and welcoming, it simply conveys a person with a welcoming spirit, a comfortable person.
If referring to a woman..
..she was a homely soul. It is not referring to looks but a feeling or emotion one might get upon comparing woman not in looks but in mannerisms.

It simply means she doesn't act like a slut.

If it refers to looks in any way it would simply mean she's not slutty looking it is more or less how she dresses that makes her homely not her actual facial features or shape or size or hair color.
She's the girl next door. Common, average, but if she wanted to she might pretty herself up just as pretty as any slut if she dared to. But that's not her style she prefers to be homely. She likes being homely. She doesn't want all the attention the slutty girls long for. She's happy and content being nobody. She's homely. She's humble, not seeking fame, not an attention whore, normal like a girl should be. Down to earth, nice to be around, unoffensive, a girl that anyone could converse with, to some guys a homely trait or character can be rather attractive. It does not mean ugly.

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Comment on Trend of referring to a singular collective as a plural noun by ron2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-27108 ron2 Fri, 9 Dec 2016 08:14:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5694/#comment-27108 It is important to understand the change in English teaching in the UK in the 1960s which meant that children were no longer taught the structure of the language. From then on understanding of usage was gained passively. This meant that the next generation of teachers did not know the correct use of English and this has had a knock-on effect over the intervening years. Reading internet posts shows the low level of literacy in English.
I have found that those who use English best are the people who learned it as a second language and were taught the rules formally.

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Comment on Walking Heavens by ron2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-27107 ron2 Fri, 9 Dec 2016 08:02:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5700/#comment-27107 It would be "the doctor's woods" for one medic and "the doctors' woods" if there were more than one.
So, given that Heaven is singular, it is "Walking Heaven's woods with her daddy."

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Comment on Capitalizing Directions by jayles the meek https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27106 jayles the meek Thu, 8 Dec 2016 21:37:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27106 @Marilyn If "west" here simply means to the west of the city, then no. However if you mean a specific region of the country such as the Rockies, then you could imply this by capitalizing given the right context. See :
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/west

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Comment on Capitalizing Directions by Marilyn https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27105 Marilyn Wed, 7 Dec 2016 18:51:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27105 I love skiing out west. Would west be capitalized? Out?

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Comment on Plural of name ending in Y by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27104 jayles the unwoven Wed, 7 Dec 2016 18:32:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27104 This would suggest -ies is more common:

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=the+Quarterlys%2Cthe+Quarterlies&year_start=1800&year_end=2000&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cthe%20Quarterlies%3B%2Cc0

could be avoided by: ".... you will receive four issues of the SGS Quarterly this year."

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Comment on Plural of name ending in Y by 01Renee https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27103 01Renee Wed, 7 Dec 2016 09:43:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27103 The glass collecting club I belong to has a quarterly publication called the SGS Quarterly. I am continually seeing it in various articles in the publication referred to (for example) as ".....you will receive four Quarterlies this year." I contend that since it is being used as a proper noun, it should only have an "s" rather than changed to "ies." Which is correct?

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Comment on Plural of name ending in Y by Renée16 https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27102 Renée16 Wed, 7 Dec 2016 09:41:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/379/#comment-27102 The glass collecting club I belong to has a quarterly publication called the SGS Quarterly. I am continually seeing it in various articles in the publication referred to (for example) as ".....you will receive four Quarterlies this year." I contend that since it is being used as a proper noun, it should only have an "s" rather than changed to "ies." Which is correct?

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Comment on Might could by Dwaro https://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-27101 Dwaro Tue, 6 Dec 2016 09:27:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/573/#comment-27101 I see nothing wrong with this term. Normal daily expression. How about Used to could as an expression. We use that also.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by jayles the unwoven https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27100 jayles the unwoven Mon, 5 Dec 2016 23:23:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27100 Resume and CV are far more common than the rest in print. There are keyboard issues with entering accents for many users.

Copy this to your browser address line for the evidence:
http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=resume_NOUN%2Cr%C3%A9sum%C3%A9%2Cresum%C3%A9%2CCV%2Ccurriculum+vitae&case_insensitive=on&year_start=1950&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t4%3B%2Cresume_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bresume_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BResume_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BRESUME_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t4%3B%2Cr%C3%A9sum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Br%C3%A9sum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BR%C3%A9sum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BR%C3%89SUM%C3%89%3B%2Cc0%3B.t4%3B%2Cresum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bresum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BResum%C3%A9%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BRESUM%C3%89%3B%2Cc0%3B.t4%3B%2CCV%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3BCV%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bcv%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BCv%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BcV%3B%2Cc0%3B.t4%3B%2Ccurriculum%20vitae%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bcurriculum%20vitae%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BCurriculum%20Vitae%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BCurriculum%20vitae%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BCURRICULUM%20VITAE%3B%2Cc0

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27099 Brus Watters Mon, 5 Dec 2016 14:16:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27099 My English dictionary, which has the word with both accents as in French, nevertheless gives the pronunciation as res- as in bet, and the emphasis on the first syllable, which is more natural. Someone suggested emphasising the final syllable, which would be like doing so to the English resumED which would be hard to do, indeed, and frankly quite daft.
I say that if you choose to use a French word as in this case, then pronounce it as in French, or why use it at all? Or use curriculum vitae, much better.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27098 Brus Watters Mon, 5 Dec 2016 12:25:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27098 Pronouncing this word as otherwise than Ray-zoom-ay is just plain wrong. Sandymc44 tells us that he or she was taught at college to pronounce the first syllable as long "a" (so RAH!! Rah-zoom-ay, then? Oh dear!). If long "a" means as in English then Ay, then Ray-zoom-ay, as we are insisting, which is indeed correct. You tell us you were taught it at college, but that it is wrong. Well it isn't: it is correct!

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Brus Watters https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27097 Brus Watters Sun, 4 Dec 2016 05:13:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27097 If we think it is pronounced 'resume-ay' we must think it means 'picked up where we left off' rather than 'summary' or 'summarised', and we are wrong then, no? That is why we need two accents, one on the first, another on the final syllable.

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