Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Sun, 25 Jun 2017 17:05:29 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Plural of Yes by Wayne Phillips https://painintheenglish.com/case/4396/#comment-27348 Wayne Phillips Sat, 24 Jun 2017 21:35:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4396/#comment-27348 It's definitely NOT yes's. After all, we're not saying that the plural of yes belongs to yes! Actually, in my opinion, that form looks wrong even when pluralizing numbers. So, for instance, I usually write "the 1970s" and not "the 1970's". But I know the accepted form with numbers includes the apostrophe. It just seems unnecessary, unless where a 5 could be mistaken for an s in a particular typeface.

Anyway, "yeses" is apparently correct. However, someone mentioned "ayes" which is an interesting alternative.

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Comment on Use of multiple periods by MoJoe https://painintheenglish.com/case/482/#comment-27347 MoJoe Fri, 23 Jun 2017 19:37:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/482/#comment-27347 I have been using "…" Between thoughts when emailing or texting since the Internet began.....I write the way I Think… In blips and stumbles. I find I can better get across what I want to say… If I'm not worrying about proper sentence structure and punctuation!

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Comment on Mileage for kilometers by david4 https://painintheenglish.com/case/451/#comment-27346 david4 Thu, 22 Jun 2017 17:42:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/451/#comment-27346 mileage, has at least 5 different definitions that I know of, however for the translation of the definition provided above, use, 'klicks' or 'kilometrage'. The later you can find in a french dictionary but not an english one, and is not widely used, likely because it is too had to say. The word, mileage, is still used in metric countries to denote distance and often people will respond 300k and make the assumption that you understood 300,000 km. The definition (variant) of the word very clearly means distance in miles and so the meaning has developed ambiguity in metric countries (because many metric countries converted from imperial to metric in the 70s), and an older person or a "smart ass" might assume miles. Thus to remove ambiguity, klick (or less favourably klik) should be used. You can find this word in both oxford and webster.

I speculate that the reason why there is no english word is because oxford (British) and webster (American) are the 2 prevailing authorities for the english language and neither of these countries use kilometres as their base unit of measurements. In Canada, the Quebec province explicitly has a linguistic department to create french words (in particular english equivalents), however there is not an linguistic department for english.

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Comment on issue as problem by Lee Robert https://painintheenglish.com/case/5355/#comment-27345 Lee Robert Wed, 21 Jun 2017 21:51:16 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5355/#comment-27345 Sadly it is true that we no longer have problems - everything is now an issue. No more health problems, financial problems or problems with our computers or TV cable - we have issues. An issue used to be something with more than one point of view, such as gun control or abortion, and a problem was something everyone agreed needed to be solved. But now issue is regularly used as a synonym for problem, which it isn't - you cannot universally substitute problem for issue. One would never talk about the women's equality problem or the gay-rights problem, because a problem always has a negative connotation. If my cable goes out, my computer freezes, or a hotel loses my reservation, those, my friends, are problems, not issues.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by P Buenafé A. Briggs https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27344 P Buenafé A. Briggs Wed, 21 Jun 2017 00:57:18 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27344 In re: Roger Burnell's entry, quote: "Sorry to correct Jun-Dai, however 'anyways' is not an English word!" - end quote; I fully agree that the aforecited word isn't an English-word. However, 'tis a popularly-accepted American-English slang that – in my opinion – signifies the speaker's unique 'Americanness' and personal comfy in being such one. . .irregardless of anybody's discomforts or critique.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by P Buenafé A. Briggs https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27343 P Buenafé A. Briggs Wed, 21 Jun 2017 00:18:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27343 The verb 'resume' [meaning: "to continue working on a unfinished job"] is to be ideally-avoided when one includes the word "resumé" [pronounced "reh zhoo may"] or "résumé" [pronounced "reh zhoo reh] in the contents of your resumé [or résumé] to be 'snail-mail' sent to your prospective employer... such as: "Please evaluate the contents of my resume for their affinity to your published-requirements of the job-position opening that I am interested to do." Contextually, that sentence can't pass muster to a spelling-corrector-nutso; but the following, could: "Please evaluate the contents of my resumé for their affinity to your published-requirements of the job-position opening that I am interested to do." AND: "Please evaluate the contents of my résumé for their affinity to your published-requirements of the job-position opening that I am interested to do."

There are strict correct-spelling-nutsos in HR Departments; and your incorrectly-spelled word resumé [or résumé - or correctly-American-English-spelled "resume"] can very-likely get your application-letter fast-forwarded on-the-fly to the receiver's trash-can!

This particular French-word's total-absorption into the English tongue [and especially into the American-English lingo] isn't an excuse to do away with the accented "é" or "és" because:
(a) at best, the writer is presumed a lackluster and a liberal-minded idiot with 'loose' manners as regards laws'/rules' abidance who shouldn't be entrusted with mathematical calculations, scientific experientations, engineering specifications, financial matters [accounting, auditing], medical prescriptions, written legal argumentation, military secrets, pædagogical teaching and poetic/oratorical writings!

and,

[b] at worst, the writer would be perceived as an English-speaking anti-French / anti-France racist extraordinaire who'd anglicized everything-French not out of routine convenience but for outright hatred against everything France-related. . .excepting french fries, perhaps - but definitely not any comely mademoiselle (if one is an English-speaking gent with raging-testosterone) or a Monsieur Adonis (if one is an estrogen-driven English-speaking lady)! That is, in addition to those irresistible bottles French champagne and cognac—which respective international trademarks can get the foolish English-speaking idiot legally-prosecuted if such stupid-fool insists to anglicize any of 'em!!! Moreover, any idiotic English-speaking moron could likely physically-and-insultingly thrown-out by enraged mobs of Québécois and/or Québécoise off the Canadian Province of Québéc with the proscriptive words "Persona non grata" explicitly tattooed in his/her passport to signify his/her lifelong-ban from re-entry into the extremely-discriminating world of those proud-of-their distinctive French-culture and everything-français, les Canadiennes et les Canadiens!

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Comment on Plural s-ending Possessives by Scott VanVliet https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27342 Scott VanVliet Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:18:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27342 My boss's last name is Fox. When I refer to him in an email, for example: "As requested, Mr. Fox' (or should it be Fox's) expense report is attached." I get confused on what way is correct. Thank you!

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Comment on “Can I get” vs. “May I have” by Hairy Scot https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27339 Hairy Scot Sun, 18 Jun 2017 06:11:47 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27339 "May I have" or "I would like" would be preferable to any of the "get" options when speaking to a waiter or shop assistant.
When speaking to a customer the use of "do you want......" should be dropped in favour of "would you like".

"Listen up" and "do the math" should be consigned to the bin for all time.

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Comment on “Can I get” vs. “May I have” by RATTY https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27336 RATTY Thu, 15 Jun 2017 18:52:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27336 Another Americanism that is creeping into our vocabulary is "listen up". Also, why are so many British women and men obsessed with driving 4 x 4's (another American influence). America has the infrastructure to deal with them - our little island doesn't! Glad I got that off my chest!

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Comment on “Can I get” vs. “May I have” by RATTY https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27335 RATTY Wed, 14 Jun 2017 18:45:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/230/#comment-27335 "Can I get?" instead of "Can I please have?" is yet ANOTHER Americanism. Why are people like sheep when it comes to anything American?

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Comment on semi-colon and colon in one sentence by Alison Weddle https://painintheenglish.com/case/2477/#comment-27334 Alison Weddle Tue, 13 Jun 2017 02:14:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/2477/#comment-27334 I need the correct grammar for a bulleted sentence in a resume. please advise. Thank you!!

" -Performs administrative and computer related duties, including: writing and editing reports, documents, and policies; communicating with staff inside the agency and customers/individuals outside the agency; monitoring agencies website for accuracy;" etc, etc.....

Thank you!

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Comment on 10 Head of Cattle by Gopalakrishnan https://painintheenglish.com/case/158/#comment-27333 Gopalakrishnan Mon, 12 Jun 2017 16:30:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/158/#comment-27333 Cattle is used as a plural. Earlier it used to be under collective noun - like herd of cattle, not herds of cattle or herd of cattles or herds of cattles.
Hence "head of cattle". It used be used with numbers like- 50 head of cattle.

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Comment on “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday” by anthony1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-27332 anthony1 Mon, 12 Jun 2017 03:51:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-27332 My daughter argues that next wednesday means the one after next!,i say it means the next wednesday on the calender!.

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by christina1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27331 christina1 Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:04:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27331 At work we use mouses seeing we have 3 just in a matter of 3 feet just for one person to use. When cleaning we will say, lift up the mouses.

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Comment on “I says” by Dariusss https://painintheenglish.com/case/237/#comment-27328 Dariusss Mon, 5 Jun 2017 13:18:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/237/#comment-27328 I often hear this grammatical slaughtering in older white American generations from the Midwest region of the US. I have corrected many people on this grammatical blasphemy and they still continue to use this form of language.

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Comment on “Anglish” by john2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27327 john2 Thu, 1 Jun 2017 05:20:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4392/#comment-27327 I just came across Anglish this early this morning. It's intriguing to say the least. However, it does seem to be clunky and awkward. Languages always was a bit of a hobby to me. But if you really want to get a good go at it, start with the kids, and tell them to start speaking Anglish to annoy their parents. :-)

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by Ashkr https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27326 Ashkr Wed, 31 May 2017 14:05:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27326 I do work in the legal field, and @ DebbieA, we do not write "percent" when writing out a percentage. We write it as "per cent". Also, I realize this conversation originated quite some time ago, but - speaking from experience - you MUST write out percentages in legal documents. For instance, in a promissory note, you would say that there was a principal sum with interest "at the rate of three and nine-tenths per cent (3.9%) per annum..." Percentages written out can be very tricky though. I still catch myself having to count exactly how many digits over from the decimal point the percentage goes, so that I will accurately reflect that amount when putting it into words.

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Comment on “that” referring to a preceding phrase by jayles the unfettered https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27325 jayles the unfettered Wed, 31 May 2017 11:35:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27325 "That" and "this" are commonly used (somewhat vaguely) to refer to the whole idea in the previous sentence or paragraph, so it is not surprising to find that the usage in this sentence is also somewhat imprecise.
Q1 "of" not needed here as "that" is non-specific: using "those" instead would refer specifically to "rates"
Q2 "That" in the second sentence might be construed as referring to "rate": so "of", "for" or "in" would work. Absolute parallelism not necessary for understanding here, although in general it is a good idea, and often taught as such.
That said, the questions are good ones; it is just depends on what type of document is being written. If this is for, say, a university paper and precise language is important, I might go with "those of the US in total" and "the same as that for the US as a whole".

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Comment on First annual vs. second annual by april1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27323 april1 Tue, 30 May 2017 21:11:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27323 What if a 3rd annual event is cancelled at the last moment, due to force majeure? Would the next year be the 4th annual event, since the 3rd annual was planned (all the work went into it, including programs and money spent, and some people even did make it before the hurricane hit and the city was evacuated). If an event is cancelled, do you count it...or skip it?

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by Englishgrammarfanatic https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27322 Englishgrammarfanatic Sun, 28 May 2017 15:19:44 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27322 Absolutely not !!! Your administrator is correct you are not.

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Dude https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27320 Dude Thu, 25 May 2017 11:06:27 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27320 You guys are all missing a very important aspect of this, and that's in the question being asked.

I would say "This is her", and so do most people that think it just sounds right, because it sounds right for good reason.

The point is, when someone asks something like
"May I please speak to Jane?"
when you reply "This is her", the 'her' is talking about Jane from the question, and you could just replace Jane with her and it still makes sense "May I please speak to her".
You wouldn't say "May I please speak to she."

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Comment on Someone else’s by John Kavanagh https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27319 John Kavanagh Wed, 24 May 2017 19:21:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27319 Who said consistency had anything to do with English¿

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Joyce https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27318 Joyce Mon, 22 May 2017 16:08:16 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27318 It's possible that the origin of the greeting, "hey" goes back a very long time ago, like maybe the 1600s -- to the Native American Navajo greeting, "Yata Hey"

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Comment on mines by Obi https://painintheenglish.com/case/4326/#comment-27315 Obi Sun, 21 May 2017 00:53:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4326/#comment-27315 You may want to ask yourself why non-standard = lazy in your mind.

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Comment on Capitalization of dog breeds by The Bearden Pack https://painintheenglish.com/case/4213/#comment-27313 The Bearden Pack Fri, 19 May 2017 22:39:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4213/#comment-27313 I'm still looking for the proper method. Everyone states something different. English can be difficult sometimes.

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Comment on When did contacting someone become reaching out? by William pelow https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27312 William pelow Thu, 18 May 2017 20:38:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27312 Who ever started the expression Reach Out ( I WILL REACH OUT to you,) sbould be shot along with everyone that uses this stupid saying. I don't reach out to anyone. I call or contact you.

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Comment on Someone else’s by Libby Owen https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27311 Libby Owen Thu, 18 May 2017 15:21:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4156/#comment-27311 I was taught that it is someone's else, not someone else's.

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Comment on take it on/off and put it on/off by MerriamWebster https://painintheenglish.com/case/5218/#comment-27309 MerriamWebster Wed, 17 May 2017 15:54:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5218/#comment-27309 So why does the Merriam-Webster just use this meaning of "put sth. off"? While it might not be a phrasal expression in your area, it seems to be used in parts of USA.

https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/put%20off

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Dan Barrett https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27308 Dan Barrett Wed, 17 May 2017 13:34:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27308 The point of creating and using grammar rules is to facilitate communication - to avoid being misunderstood. For example, to say, "I do not want a hamburger" does NOT mean that I want to avoid a hamburger; it merely means that I have no desire to possess one - I do not WANT one, but I would accept one. However, to say, "I want to not have a hamburger" means that I wish to avoid hamburger possession. I am a substitute teacher, and I hear sloppy statements all the time from teachers and students alike; these speakers run the risk of being misunderstood. If I were in a spaceship and was receiving instructions from NASA, I would hope the speaker on Earth would adhere to my standards, regardless of what is common vernacular.

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Comment on Writing out percentages correctly by DebbieA https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27307 DebbieA Tue, 16 May 2017 23:18:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/859/#comment-27307 Can the word percent ever be written as two separate words? Do the people in the UK write it as per cent?

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Comment on gifting vs. giving a gift by Janer https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27306 Janer Tue, 16 May 2017 21:08:34 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27306 Historic reference or not, "gifted" is yet another step on the road to the destruction of language and definitions. (Anyone consider that the Mary Levinston quote was in error?) Most concerning is that there seems to be a world-wide adoption of bad American word usage. Even BBC reporters, and many people they interview sound like Valley Girls with a British accent, and they use words such as, gifted, transitioned, etc., and everyone, it seems, is "going forward," even if they are in reverse. All nouns simply cannot become verbs. But what is the appeal of dumbed-down American English? I don't understand. I'm not suggesting that usage does not change, but I cAn't stAnd it.

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by wolfwoman@ltis.net https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27305 wolfwoman@ltis.net Tue, 16 May 2017 19:00:54 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27305 I lean toward mouses for the plural. First, it grates on my nerves to refer to two or more computer mouses/mice as mice. All I can think of is real rodents. Second, a great deal of computer jargon has been invented, if you will, by computer geeks who weren't very good at English grammar or syntax--or meaning. However, the many goofy terms have become well-accepted. In keeping with that goofiness, I definitely prefer the goofiness of "mouses."

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Comment on Complete Sentence by Meredith https://painintheenglish.com/case/530/#comment-27304 Meredith Mon, 15 May 2017 20:06:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/530/#comment-27304 Is this sentence considered a complete sentence? Oh can you see?

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Comment on Pronunciation of indefinite article “a” by Marven Hansen https://painintheenglish.com/case/5014/#comment-27301 Marven Hansen Thu, 11 May 2017 16:04:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5014/#comment-27301 In the old "I Love Lucy" shows the loudest laughter always occurred when Desi broke in and asked "will you esplain........." Now, every TV announcer says it his way with no laughter. In fact, they have eliminated the "k" sound from most words that previously had them. Often this leads to confusion as in: " the Assessor could not access the house." was nobody home or was it that the roadway was under construction?

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Comment on How many thats? by Doctor Bones https://painintheenglish.com/case/488/#comment-27297 Doctor Bones Tue, 9 May 2017 20:49:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/488/#comment-27297 This "that" is so much like that "that", that that "that" was mistaken for this "that". That's confusing

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Comment on Colon and semicolon in a single sentence by brittlefinger https://painintheenglish.com/case/616/#comment-27295 brittlefinger Tue, 9 May 2017 08:28:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/616/#comment-27295 Are the people listed here, regarded as his true brothers? He missed his true brothers: Little Rickon bright eyes shining as he begged for a sweet; Robb, his rival and best friend and constant companion;Bran, stubborn curious, always wanting to follow and join in whateverRobb and Jon were doing

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Comment on Pled versus pleaded by Leesa https://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-27293 Leesa Mon, 8 May 2017 21:40:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4191/#comment-27293 IT IS PLED!

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Comment on What exactly is “width” in geometry? by Dyske https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27292 Dyske Mon, 8 May 2017 11:46:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27292 I just thought of one scenario where "width" is indeed used independently of the orientation: a carpet.

I think most people would call the shorter side "width" and the longer side "length" when describing the dimensions of a carpet regardless of where they are standing in relation to it. And, if they were to draw it on a piece of paper, they are more likely to draw it horizontally and still call the vertical side "width." This is because we write horizontally; drawing the carpet vertically on a sheet of paper would take up too much space.

So, any two-dimensional shape lying flat on the ground would use the convention where "width" is orientation-neutral. This may include a shape of land, pool, and road. It, therefore, makes sense that Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (the quote in my original post) would use "width" independently of the orientation. In fact, I can't think of another word that we could use instead of "width." In other languages, there may be an orientation-neutral word that is paired with "length" which simply means "the shorter side." In English, there isn't one.

This may be the source of confusion.

The word "height" has no ambiguities because it's not possible for us to change our standing positions in order to change the orientation. (We would have to be able to defy gravity and stand on a wall.) In contrast, with a shape lying flat on the ground, we can easily change the orientation without moving the object, hence the confusion/ambiguity.

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Comment on What exactly is “width” in geometry? by tall not wide https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27291 tall not wide Mon, 8 May 2017 10:31:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27291 The geometric definition of width is not really up for interpretation. From Wolfram Mathworld; "The width of a box is the horizontal distance from side to side" -- http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Width.html

Additionally, hundreds of millions of websites and every computer, phone and tablet capable of rendering a web page has agreed that width is the horizontal measure of a box, height refers to the vertical.

How is this nonsense possible?

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Comment on Inch vs. Inches by Holly Fake https://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-27290 Holly Fake Sun, 7 May 2017 22:33:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-27290 What is 1/12 of 3?

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Comment on Gerontophile? by Kaye https://painintheenglish.com/case/160/#comment-27289 Kaye Sun, 7 May 2017 20:59:11 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/160/#comment-27289 I am 31 years old and attracted to older (much older, like they were legal drinking age or older when I was born) men. It has nothing to do with "daddy issues" or a "parental hand" or even "the need to be taken care of". My dad was a great man, I have a problem with authority, and I can take care of myself. There's just something about older men that just does it for me, I guess.

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Comment on Inch vs. Inches by Judy https://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-27288 Judy Sat, 6 May 2017 23:00:57 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/2396/#comment-27288 I bought a rug whose height is 0.32 inches. Is that more or less then 1/2 inch?

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Comment on Salutations in letters by R G Kay https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27286 R G Kay Thu, 4 May 2017 13:23:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5731/#comment-27286 For actual letters, typed or handwritten, I still use "Dear" to address and "Sincerely" or "Yours truly" to sign off. For emails I address by title and last name when its formal, and sign off with "Respectfully". I haven't written an informal letter in a long time since I don't know anyone who actually still wants to see my handwriting (and I'm not typing a letter on the computer). Informal email is addressed with "Hello", "Hi" or some other form of informal salutation and signed off with "ciao", "bye", "love" or my favorite "szia" (as much as bye in Hungarian - and no, I don't speak it).

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by R G Kay https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27285 R G Kay Thu, 4 May 2017 12:54:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27285 While this is a discussion of Latin words in English, I'm frightened by the inclusion of a German word, Schnapps, the plural of which is not Schnappsen. Until reading this discussion, I have never seen Schnappsen anywhere (not that I'm a regular consumer of such beverages). Also Schnapps, though directly taken from German is spelled with only one 'p' in its original form. The plural in German would be Schnaepse (if you can't make the umlaut), or Schnäpse. Beyond that forums vice fora is a matter of preference though my spell check prefers the former, I the latter.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by CareerCoachDavid https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27284 CareerCoachDavid Wed, 3 May 2017 14:18:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27284 May I resume work on my work resumé?

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Comment on A Part of ... by sumita https://painintheenglish.com/case/11/#comment-27282 sumita Mon, 1 May 2017 22:18:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/11/#comment-27282 whats correct

A part of EG group
or
Part of EG Group

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Comment on First annual vs. second annual by Miss Sally https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27279 Miss Sally Sun, 30 Apr 2017 10:55:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27279 So when I am 1 on my first birthday I have lived 1 whole year and I am beginning my 2nd birthday on my 1st birthday......On my 80th birthday I have lived 80 years and I am beginning my 81st birthday on my 80th birthday. IS THIS CORRECT? ? ? ? ?

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Comment on Why “behead” and not “dehead” or “unhead”? by brendan https://painintheenglish.com/case/819/#comment-27275 brendan Fri, 28 Apr 2017 10:41:07 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/819/#comment-27275 your completely wrong

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Gail Padgett https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27274 Gail Padgett Thu, 27 Apr 2017 09:34:54 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27274 I live in the South and have heard this quite frequently. Funnily enough, the speakers who engage in this linguistic homicide are from the NORTH!

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Comment on First annual vs. second annual by Kim Bridge https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27273 Kim Bridge Wed, 26 Apr 2017 12:13:09 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/925/#comment-27273 The eleventh year after the inaugural year..
is there a special adjective?

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