Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Tue, 21 Nov 2017 13:12:07 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on Capitalizing Directions by rm https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27471 rm Sat, 18 Nov 2017 19:58:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/968/#comment-27471 Which is correct:

"Under the stairs by south hall. South hall was make-out central."
OR
"Under the stairs by South Hall. South Hall was make-out central."

South hall being a specific hall on a school campus. There is no reference in the text regarding signage or official title.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Daniel Swem https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27469 Daniel Swem Sat, 18 Nov 2017 00:40:56 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27469 I'm a school teacher in Macon, Ga. I had never heard the usage of the preposition "on" in this context until I started teaching at an inner-city school. My principal, vice-principal, academic coach, and the superintendent of school all use this vernacular. It is very common in the educated African American community of middle Georgia. It drives me nuts. It changes an adverb into the noun of a prepositional phrase modifying a verb. If I had hair, I'd pull it out.

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by tonya https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-27468 tonya Fri, 17 Nov 2017 16:46:57 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-27468 I work pre filling forms for different types of insurance. We have had this same debate. Does “street” mean the street you live on and therefore your home? I say no and here is why:

A company always wants an address they can mail your mail to, unless they ask for a "home", "residence" or “legal”. That being said, every address no matter PO or not has a: street, city, state, and zip. Most people will go on to say a PO box is not a street but I will always add, NOT EVERY town or person has a PO box at a Post Office. For example, I use to use a PO box at "Mail Boxs Etc." a small po box location and store with Kinkos type services. Very large cities have more than one main post office. Therefore, those people still have a "Street" address. "Street address" simple means the number and street name, it is the first part of every address “street, city, state, and zip”. For example my address at the Mail Box Etc. was: 6565 La Sierra Ave. PO BOX 144, Riverside CA, 92505. "6565 La Sierra PO BOX 144" is my "street". If I did not have to list a number and street name because my PO box is the main post office or my post office has shown me my address is only listed as PO BOX 144 then my "PO BOX 144" would be my "street address".

So if you see just “street address” They are simple asking for your “address” and your address should ALWAYS be your mailing address unless otherwise asked. They only want your home, resistance, or legal address for legal matters (all 3 of those are the same address asked in different ways) and ALWAYS want to mail you something. If they need your home they will ask, otherwise mailing address is the default. So imagine it says “address. “street”_________. They placed the word “address” behind street instead of placing in separated as “Address: “street, city, state, zip”. Get it?

Do you agree? Or should I still be debating this with co workers? lol

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Comment on Ass by phillip1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1057/#comment-27467 phillip1 Thu, 16 Nov 2017 04:07:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1057/#comment-27467 If you could point to a measurable benefit that has arisen by allowing children to act like unruly adults, what would it be?

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Comment on On Tomorrow by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27466 jayles Thu, 9 Nov 2017 19:25:41 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27466 @ Chrissy

Since you are college educated at least get the facts straight:

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.co.nz/2014/01/random-thoughts-about-on-tomorrow.html

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Chrissy https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27465 Chrissy Wed, 8 Nov 2017 19:55:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27465 I am 29 from North Jersey and college educated. I too cringe when I hear "on tomorrow". There was a time when I only heard it while visiting the South but it is spreading. I just heard a NY politician use it twice on television.

To anyone who has a problem with their principal: It is NOT your place to ever correct the grammar of your superior at work. "On tomorrow" is not something learned in school, obviously it is picked at home. Most people I confront really do not notice their error and are terribly embarrassed.

To say that this is exclusive to Black people might sound a little racist but it is unfortunately true. I feel embarrassed when other Black people jack up English in front of White people. After reading all of your comments my worst fears have been confirmed. You guys hear a black person speak a little differently and automatically assume we've had a subpar education. Smh! Even if the person is your boss, you still question their intellect! Sad.

Teachers! : While it is highly inappropriate to correct a colleague it is Your job to properly educate your students. Teach them! This is exactly why HBCUs are so important. White "teachers" giving up on their Black students grammar??? Allow me to insert another Black colloquialism here, "where they do that at?" Shame! You may not have to take an oath like a doctor but you too have a duty, to educate!

I will no longer roll my eyes when I hear Black people say "on tomorrow" or "axe". I will correct them at the appropriate time. Now, which of you is going to teach my landscaper to stop saying "yous"? ! That's an uneducated white Jersey thing, right? ?

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Comment on gifting vs. giving a gift by Malcolm Dale https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27464 Malcolm Dale Wed, 8 Nov 2017 11:01:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27464 "we can sleep six at a pinch but we can only eat twelve." James Thurber commenting on adverts for houses that "sleep six".
I'm sure he would agree that you give a gift and not the other way round.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Robyn Spencer https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27463 Robyn Spencer Tue, 7 Nov 2017 20:36:06 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27463 You are absolutely correct. I believe it is something that was in the southern region and has found itself in the northeastern region. It is somewhat redundant to have a preposition indicating when and then use a word indicating when.

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27462 jayles Tue, 7 Nov 2017 19:44:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27462 http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=advocate+*_NOUN%2Cadvocate+for+the+*&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20%2A_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20violence_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20policies_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20role_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20change_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20groups_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20general_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20Ralph_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20changes_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20peace_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20use_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20for%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20child%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20rights%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20client%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20patient%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20poor%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20defence%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20needs%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20use%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20interests%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20elderly%3B%2Cc0

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27461 jayles Tue, 7 Nov 2017 19:43:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27461 https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=advocate+*_NOUN%2Cadvocate+for+the+*&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20%2A_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20violence_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20policies_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20role_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20change_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20groups_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20general_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20Ralph_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20changes_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20peace_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20use_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2Cadvocate%20for%20the%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20child%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20rights%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20client%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20patient%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20poor%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20defence%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20needs%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20use%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20interests%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Badvocate%20for%20the%20elderly%3B%2Cc0

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Comment on “advocate for” or just “advocate”? by awd https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27460 awd Mon, 6 Nov 2017 20:43:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4792/#comment-27460 So okay, does one "advocate their library" or "advocate for their library"?
I can be an advocate for using the library (be a person who encourages the use of the library) and I can advocate for the library (actively raise awareness of -or- build support for)

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Comment on Plural s-ending Possessives by Grassgirl214@gmail.com https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27459 Grassgirl214@gmail.com Sun, 5 Nov 2017 12:11:22 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27459 Our last name is Grass. In signing our signature as a couple would it be "the Grasses"?
Thank you!

Melanie Grass :)

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Comment on “if he were alive, he would be” vs. “would have been” by Zeeshan Butt https://painintheenglish.com/case/5771/#comment-27458 Zeeshan Butt Fri, 3 Nov 2017 19:11:28 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5771/#comment-27458 I need to understand correct use of " had been". Can I write a sentence in this way:

My dead son had been a good friend of mine. He had been a brave boy who fought courageously. He had been suffering from liver cancer etc...

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Comment on Difference between acronyms and initials? by Eala https://painintheenglish.com/case/4862/#comment-27457 Eala Fri, 3 Nov 2017 13:18:05 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4862/#comment-27457 I loved reading this commentary. Surprisingly there is no mention of SNAFU. From WWII and popularized in Catch 22

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Comment on Plural s-ending Possessives by Alexandria Guerrero https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27456 Alexandria Guerrero Wed, 1 Nov 2017 23:05:27 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/223/#comment-27456 For a welcome sign for the last name Gonzalez
Would it be “the Gonzalez’s?

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by mobotak https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27455 mobotak Tue, 24 Oct 2017 09:39:36 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27455 that was interesting
any way this is mobotak.com and its a company whom interested in tech and electronic gadgets.our company buy,sell and repair cell phones,tablets and computers ans so sell their accessories,if you have any questions about this kind of staff we will glad to help.
mobotak.com/Categorygrid/id/74/%D9%82%D8%A7%D8%A8%20%DA%AF%D9%88%D8%B4%DB%8C
mobotak.com/Categorygrid/id/80/%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%AA%D8%B1%DB%8C%20%D9%85%D9%88%D8%A8%D8%A7%DB%8C%D9%84

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by mobotak https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27454 mobotak Tue, 24 Oct 2017 09:38:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27454 thanks
that was useful.
any way this is mobotak.com and its a company whom interested in tech and electronic gadgets.our company buy,sell and repair cell phones,tablets and computers ans so sell their accessories,if you have any questions about this kind of staff we will glad to help.
mobotak.com/Categorygrid/id/74/%D9%82%D8%A7%D8%A8%20%DA%AF%D9%88%D8%B4%DB%8C
mobotak.com/Categorygrid/id/80/%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%AA%D8%B1%DB%8C%20%D9%85%D9%88%D8%A8%D8%A7%DB%8C%D9%84
your sincerely,

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Comment on “went missing/gone missing”? by annie2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27453 annie2 Fri, 20 Oct 2017 01:50:15 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27453 I dislike the use of this phrase as a replacement for any phrase which implies blame or responsibility. It is easier for someone to say "my purse went missing" than "I misplaced my purse", etc. It is similar to a person choosing to say "The glass broke" as opposed to "I broke the glass". We are so very good at denying blame or responsibility.

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Comment on eat vs. have breakfast by Rukfas https://painintheenglish.com/case/352/#comment-27452 Rukfas Tue, 17 Oct 2017 21:16:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/352/#comment-27452 I have another question, but related to this: is the word breakfast a verb? That is, can we say 'I breakfasted eggs this morning.'? Or for that matter, can we say '- What are you doing? -I'm breakfasting,' instead of 'I'm having a breakfast.'? Thanks

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Comment on Complete Sentence by Whitney Dorsey https://painintheenglish.com/case/530/#comment-27451 Whitney Dorsey Tue, 17 Oct 2017 18:32:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/530/#comment-27451 Is asking "John Smith?" a full sentence?

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Comment on agree the terms by providencejim https://painintheenglish.com/case/5811/#comment-27450 providencejim Sun, 15 Oct 2017 19:15:57 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5811/#comment-27450 Finebetty's research seems to settle the question. But as an American user of the language I will not be saying "agree the terms" anytime soon.

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Comment on “It is I” vs. “It is me” by John R. Baldwin https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-27449 John R. Baldwin Sun, 15 Oct 2017 19:11:14 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/642/#comment-27449 The reason the verb "to be" is an exception is that its meaning makes it equivalent to an equal sign. "It is I." means: It = I.

Both "It" and "I" are co-equal subjects of the sentence. There is no object. The subject of a sentence, in this case both subjects, require the nominative case.

Contrast this with the sentence : "It hit me." The subject "it" acts upon the object "me," so the objective case is required.

Another example of the exception with the verb "to be", which may be surprising, is: "It was we." This is the correct usage for the same reason, however in common usage, most people say, "It was us," which is technically incorrect.

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Comment on agree the terms by finebetty https://painintheenglish.com/case/5811/#comment-27448 finebetty Sun, 15 Oct 2017 15:58:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5811/#comment-27448 'Agree' can be used intransitively and transitively. According to Merriam Webster, your example is "chiefly British" - which I guess means it does come up but is rare in the US whereas it is standard in British English (and not "bad form" at all, please note that 'agree to the terms' changes the meaning, 'agree on or upon' is the only option here).
Oxford dict:
2.1 with object Reach agreement about (something) after negotiation.
‘if they had agreed a price the deal would have gone through’
no object ‘the commission agreed on a proposal to limit imports’
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/agree

MW:
transitive verb
2. chiefly British: to settle on by common consent
e.g. … I agreed rental terms with him … —Eric Bennett
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/agree

(the 'before' in your example does not belong to 'agreed' of course - i.e., it means 'must be agreed upon before...')

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Comment on Worst Case or Worse Case by Eric F https://painintheenglish.com/case/338/#comment-27446 Eric F Wed, 11 Oct 2017 18:39:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/338/#comment-27446 "worse-case" is a comparison between TWO degrees of tribulation. Which one of the TWO options is worse than the other?
"worst-case" implies that there are many degrees of tribulation, and it is the worst of many options.

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Comment on “went missing/gone missing”? by providencejim https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27445 providencejim Wed, 11 Oct 2017 15:11:44 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27445 For LaurenBC: I find it's useful to read previous comments before posting. For example, Warsaw Will on June 6, 2014, contributed a lengthy discussion of the idiom's history and defense which included the fact that it's been seen in British written texts as early as 1859.

So the phrase is not of recent origin and is now widely accepted. I think fewer folks are bothered by it than by, say, the use of multiple question marks (or exclamation points in declarative sentences) in online posts.

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Comment on “went missing/gone missing”? by LorenBC https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27444 LorenBC Wed, 11 Oct 2017 00:30:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4298/#comment-27444 This expression (and its variations) drives me crazy. It’s right up there with “the reason being” instead of “the reason is” or, more simply, “because “!

The English language is getting slaughtered ????

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by RobertRiley https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27443 RobertRiley Mon, 9 Oct 2017 08:29:27 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27443 Lego (the bricks) should be lego in both singular and plural, like fish or sheep.

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Comment on Word in question: Conversate by chris watts https://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-27442 chris watts Mon, 9 Oct 2017 05:58:46 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4304/#comment-27442 douglas.bryant

In your rush to discredit 'conversate' you're grossly misusing 'dialectical':

dialectical | ˌdīəˈlektək(ə)l |
adjective
1 relating to the logical discussion of ideas and opinions: dialectical ingenuity.
2 concerned with or acting through opposing forces: a dialectical opposition between social convention and individual libertarianism.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Jackie https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27441 Jackie Wed, 4 Oct 2017 12:44:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27441 This thread has been running for years and years! I don't believe at all that "hey" goes back to a native American greeting. It's been used in British English for a very long time to attract someone's attention dramatically, as in "Hey, you there!" or "Hey, stop that!" It's used mostly towards strangers; otherwise one would call them by name. It's certainly nothing to do with the "silent (??) language of lovers" in Britain. It can be aggressive, and is never used to address someone in an email.
Hi is definitely an import from America, still resisted by some who don't wish the English language to become americanised, and is an informal greeting equivalent to "hello". It's become accepted as a greeting at the beginning of an email, instead of the more formal "Dear...".

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Comment on me vs. myself by Eddie https://painintheenglish.com/case/4294/#comment-27440 Eddie Wed, 4 Oct 2017 12:11:38 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4294/#comment-27440 It seems like there's an obsession with "self." I've heard evening news people use "myself" instead of "me" and "myself" instead of "I." I even heard someone use "hisself" in a sentence. And the culprits are journalists. Hisself? C'mon, man.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Caroline Reid https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27439 Caroline Reid Mon, 2 Oct 2017 06:18:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27439 "Hey" is Southern and has a warm inviting feeling that is expressed, much different than just "Hi".

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Comment on Impact as a noun by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/987/#comment-27438 jayles Sun, 1 Oct 2017 09:04:45 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/987/#comment-27438 However "impacted" as an adjective seems to retain its original physical meaning:

http://www.google.co.nz/search?q=%22impacted%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en&dcr=0&gbv=1&sei=f67QWfamMsf_8gXuo6rQDA

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Comment on Right Question For this Answer (about count/rank/order) by john3 https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27437 john3 Sat, 30 Sep 2017 04:41:53 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/250/#comment-27437 hg

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Comment on When did contacting someone become reaching out? by Patricia https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27436 Patricia Sat, 30 Sep 2017 03:34:56 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5299/#comment-27436 I am glad to read that I am not the only person annoyed by the current usage of this expression!

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Comment on “she” vs “her” by David Forest https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27435 David Forest Thu, 28 Sep 2017 16:51:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4377/#comment-27435 Question. Where does the "she" fall in the following sentence:
She and her friend will do something" or "Her friend and she will do something"? Technically, it seems like it should be the latter, but the former sounds better.

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Comment on Computer mouses or computer mice? by Hurley https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27434 Hurley Tue, 26 Sep 2017 23:33:58 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/534/#comment-27434 In most countries computer 'mouse' is translated to the animal name such as 'mus' in my language. Based on this 'mice' is most correct. End of discussion. Heh.

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Comment on “I’ve got” vs. “I have” by BestGary https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27433 BestGary Sun, 24 Sep 2017 23:36:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4549/#comment-27433 If you can substitute 'got' with 'fetched' in your sentence, you are not using 'got' incorrectly.

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Comment on Idea Vs. Ideal by jenny1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27432 jenny1 Sat, 23 Sep 2017 17:53:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/519/#comment-27432 "I have an idea."
"This is an ideal situation."

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Comment on percentages by jack1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/461/#comment-27431 jack1 Fri, 22 Sep 2017 05:11:42 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/461/#comment-27431 For the most part, it is accurate that spelling out numbers is wrong. However, in legal writing (I'm a legal proofreader), often it is required that everything be spelled out exactly, with the express purpose of making sure there is no wiggle room for interpretation. Shakespeare had some thoughts about lawyers in Henry VI...

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Comment on Cut on/off by Mark Harrington https://painintheenglish.com/case/4107/#comment-27430 Mark Harrington Thu, 21 Sep 2017 12:40:29 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4107/#comment-27430 Maybe this is the answer.
http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/power-cut?q=power%20cut&a=british

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Comment on Sweet and Savory by Devlyn https://painintheenglish.com/case/65/#comment-27429 Devlyn Wed, 20 Sep 2017 03:59:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/65/#comment-27429 Unsavoury sums it all up. When something is unsavoury, it means that it is just vile. Got nothing to do with salty and sweet

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Comment on I don’t think... by donal Godfrey https://painintheenglish.com/case/286/#comment-27428 donal Godfrey Tue, 19 Sep 2017 22:00:30 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/286/#comment-27428 I don't think implies or directly translates to "I do not think" when actually I do think, but "I think you did not" a more positive direct statement or translation. Or "I don't think" so is "I think not" because you do THINK "no".

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Comment on “Liquid water”? by quincy https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27427 quincy Sun, 17 Sep 2017 13:58:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27427 In my geography homework they ask if snow and ice are examples of liquid water but i can't find it in the book and i can't find a good awnser online can you help me?

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Jay Kasey https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27426 Jay Kasey Sun, 17 Sep 2017 03:10:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27426 What about the following situation? Would it be the same "equivalence"?
"Was Helen the murderer?"
"It was she?" or "It was her"?

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Tdream https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27425 Tdream Thu, 14 Sep 2017 01:50:33 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27425 I was taught in school, "This is she." One way to completely dodge the issue would be the following scenario:
Hello, may I speak to Jane Doe?
Yes, This is Mrs. Doe (or Jane).

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Comment on “This is she” vs. “This is her” by Tdream https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27424 Tdream Thu, 14 Sep 2017 01:50:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/811/#comment-27424 I was taught in school, "This is she." One way to completely dodge the issue would be the following scenario:
Hello, may I speak to Jane Doe?
Yes, This is Mrs. Doe (or Jane).

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Comment on Exact same by greg the egg https://painintheenglish.com/case/1006/#comment-27423 greg the egg Wed, 13 Sep 2017 20:27:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/1006/#comment-27423 LIfe keeps changing all the time so why wouldn't language and the way it's used and accepted?

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by Verso Folio https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27422 Verso Folio Tue, 12 Sep 2017 14:23:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27422 For those who prefer a little ostentatiousness, an easy way to type "résumé" (with the accents) is to misspell it as "resum." When you right click on the misspelled version, one of the replacement options is "résumé." As to whether you SHOULD use the accents, I'll leave that to my fiancée.

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Comment on Sleep / Asleep by justin1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3883/#comment-27421 justin1 Tue, 12 Sep 2017 11:36:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3883/#comment-27421 I live in the midwest (NE) and I hear it all the time, mostly from ignorant or lesser educated people, usually by choice. I had a roommate who use to get called late at night and he'd answer like "What do you want?, I'm sleep". I thought I misheard him the first time or 2 but every time the word came up it was used in that manner... as if he was assuming the process himself, no longer being the person he was and transcending as the very form of inactive consciousness.

I mean, the first time I heard it, I had to put the fork down because I was eat, my thoughts were run so fast. It literally made my stomach turn that I ran to the bathroom, and there I was sh*t so bad, prob due to the verbal diarrhea I was hear.

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Comment on “reach out” by ruth https://painintheenglish.com/case/5118/#comment-27420 ruth Mon, 11 Sep 2017 17:44:20 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5118/#comment-27420 Now, in 2017, 'reach out' has become an adjective "reach out efforts" if not a noun. What's wrong with 'outreach'?

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