Comments for Pain in the English https://painintheenglish.com Forum for the gray areas of the English language Fri, 23 Feb 2018 07:22:19 +0000 hourly 1 Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by osbert https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27558 osbert Thu, 22 Feb 2018 19:02:02 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27558 "Me either" makes as much sense as "I could care less", I think both are dull-brained mistakes, possibly originally by a non-native English speaker, then subsequently accepted as good English. "Me neither" is rough, but at least logical: "nor I, either" just isn't heard these days, but "neither am/have I" is commonly heard and logical. Grammar: descriptive rather than prescriptive, but some howlers ought to be laughed out of court.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by osbert https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27557 osbert Thu, 22 Feb 2018 19:01:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27557 "Me either" makes as much sense as "I could care less", I think both are dull-brained mistakes, possibly originally by a non-native English speaker, then subsequently accepted as good English. "Me neither" is rough, but at least logical: "nor I, either" just isn't heard these days, but "neither am/have I" is commonly heard and logical. Grammar: descriptive rather than prescriptive, but some howlers ought to be laughed out of court.

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by mark1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27556 mark1 Thu, 22 Feb 2018 08:41:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27556 LEGO does not refer to the bricks, but to the brand. Therefore, it is incorrect to say LEGOs, as you would be referring to multiple LEGO companies. The only correct way to refer to them is "LEGO bricks."

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by Mr A Gow https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27555 Mr A Gow Wed, 21 Feb 2018 16:25:34 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27555 The name "LEGO" is not derived from English language, and therefore it cannot be stated that the very English method of adding an 's' for a plural is definitively correct. In this case I would suggest LEGO pieces (as the company itself requests), especially now that the LEGO brand has diversified into films, video games, and even cake tins. It is worth noting, however, that throughout most of the world the plural of LEGO has always been simply LEGO.

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27554 jayles Wed, 21 Feb 2018 03:18:59 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27554 On google books "neither are to blame" shows up just nineteen times, whereas "neither is to blame" has over five thousand results.

https://www.google.com/search?biw=1432&bih=955&tbm=bks&ei=seSMWs6CEYa00gS8mpYo&q=%22neither+is+to+blame%22&oq=%22neither+is+to+blame%22&gs_l=psy-ab.3...49546.50825.0.51465.5.5.0.0.0.0.328.637.3-2.2.0....0...1c.1.64.psy-ab..3.0.0....0.6mXbV0-cCT0

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27553 jayles Mon, 19 Feb 2018 09:54:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27553 " neither were significant predictors of the outcome measures"
"they were not working mischief, neither were they doing any great good; "
"neither were most of their members prepared to take part as citizens."
"Things are either what they appear to be: or they neither are, nor appear to be"
"And if the fountains are not gods, neither are the rivers,"
"Neither are we truly portraying what Christ's disciple means. "

Both are possible, depending on the context:

https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=neither+is%2Cneither+are%2Cneither+was%2Cneither+were&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=18&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cneither%20is%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20are%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20was%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cneither%20were%3B%2Cc0

https://www.google.com/search?q=%22neither%20were%22&tbm=bks&lr=lang_en

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Comment on Neither is or neither are by Edinrin https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27552 Edinrin Sat, 17 Feb 2018 15:42:26 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/38/#comment-27552 'Neither are' is correct
For example: neither are to blame for the damage done.

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Comment on “Me neither.” or “Me either” by Nonyobizz https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27551 Nonyobizz Thu, 15 Feb 2018 23:03:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/109/#comment-27551 well, actually, grammar rules themselves don't exist. there has never been any set rules, because the "rules" depend on how a majority decides to speak, and they change as the years go by. "ain't" used to be considered grammatically correct and was used by rich English folk, but when "commoners" started using it, they decided it wasn't proper English. this fact won't change how society treats grammar (like it's friggin LAW), but I feel like we should all be more lax and just use whatever feels right to us. I mean, soon, "I did good on my test" will be considered proper grammar.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by Joshua Sattler https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27550 Joshua Sattler Thu, 15 Feb 2018 19:18:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27550 It’s a church thing. I’m willing to bet that the people heard saying “on tomorrow” are heavily influenced by the church. Church folk are the people I’ve ever heard say it.

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Comment on The use of “hey” in place of “hello”. by Rajena Andrews https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27549 Rajena Andrews Thu, 15 Feb 2018 18:53:15 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/605/#comment-27549 There is a male coworker that when ever he speaks to the females in our office always starts with "Heyyy name, how's it going?" Is it just me, i feel it is so disrespectful and annoying. What are your thoughts?

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Monocle https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27548 Monocle Thu, 15 Feb 2018 12:06:00 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27548 The past tense of Text is Text.

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Comment on Past tense of “text” by Jesse Wade Atkins https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27547 Jesse Wade Atkins Wed, 14 Feb 2018 22:41:09 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/474/#comment-27547 Just hard for me to believe,"texted" would be proper. Just saying ????????????????????

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Comment on gifting vs. giving a gift by marina1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27546 marina1 Wed, 14 Feb 2018 16:12:04 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4520/#comment-27546 I'm so glad to read that others are annoyed at this shift of "gift" to an unnecessary verb!
I am also irritated by the ubiquitous use of " no problem" to every request in the service industry. When was it considered a problem to ask a sales person, or wait person question? It's a double negative. Wouldn't a simple, "happy to help," be more positive?!

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Comment on “Liquid water”? by KARTIK KHANNA https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27545 KARTIK KHANNA Tue, 13 Feb 2018 06:27:46 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27545 Modeling of Coupled Water and Heat Transfer in
Freezing and Thawing Soils, Inner Mongolia

One article for your reference. I am having atleast 100 other examples. Best Wishes

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Comment on “Liquid water”? by KARTIK KHANNA https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27544 KARTIK KHANNA Tue, 13 Feb 2018 06:20:17 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4981/#comment-27544 Your observation is very correct. That is a question which I have been looking answer for.

It is not only cosmology, please check articles on Planetary science, Crystallography, Geophysics, Glaciology, Permafrost, Ice crystals in soil etc. everywhere they use the term liquid water. Probably it is in order to differentaite the state of water but it is not required as water is actually liquid, else we refer it as crystal, ice, snow or vapour. Thanks for asking this question and to all others please read before answering. Just google it or preferably search it on researchgate or google scholar..best wishes

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Comment on Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange” by Kron https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27543 Kron Mon, 12 Feb 2018 12:45:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27543 There are many who have ancestors of European descent in North America and Britain who've known this for thousands of years. Personally, I've never heard any white people pronounce 'street' as 'schreet' but I cannot dispute this either nor will I do this. There are two answers to this concerning the white people who pronounciate certain words as so. 1) Some are deliberately 'mispronouncing' certain words that they know they can pronounce correctly. 2) Some actually have the tongue to pronounce these words as such beyond their control. I won't post the reasons why numbers 1 and 2 is possible (in the case of both, black people are included as well), you'll just have to think about it.

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Comment on Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange” by Kron https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27542 Kron Mon, 12 Feb 2018 12:31:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5231/#comment-27542 The answer is in the Book of Judges chapter 12.

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Comment on Resume, resumé, or résumé? by wordsnob https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27541 wordsnob Fri, 9 Feb 2018 16:33:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/193/#comment-27541 I would disagree with Jun-Dai in that the middle spelling (using an accent on only the last e) is actually correct and accents on both e's would be incorrect, both in terms of pronunciation and misuse of the accent on the first e.
I, and others, feel that no accent is confusing and, again, being a French word, incorrect.

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Comment on You Joking Me? by kate1 https://painintheenglish.com/case/412/#comment-27540 kate1 Fri, 9 Feb 2018 11:17:50 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/412/#comment-27540 Another abuse of the English language together with 'would of' 'we was', 'you was', 'stadiums', 'criterias' and many, many more.

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Comment on Texted by Bear https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27539 Bear Thu, 8 Feb 2018 21:34:12 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27539 Texted or Text-ed sounds terrible either way. Why say "I texted a message" When saying I text a message works just fine.
ex: I text you today did you get it? I text everyone yesterday, When you text me the other day etc. XXX (Texted/Text-ed) XXX

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Comment on “study of” vs. “study on” by ayman https://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-27538 ayman Thu, 8 Feb 2018 16:30:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4134/#comment-27538 the preposition after the noun "study"

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Comment on Canadian pronunciation of “out and about” by kentix https://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-27537 kentix Mon, 5 Feb 2018 17:09:54 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4413/#comment-27537 At 0:12 (to 0:13) in the McDonald's video she also sounds Canadian to my American ears. "We get asked that a lot." It's subtle, but both the "asked" and the "a lot" sound different than what I'm used to hearing. And, of course, the "out" at 0:17 and the "about" at 0:48 are a dead giveaway. Also, she uses the word "exact" several times starting at 1:35 and those sound different, too.

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Comment on Motives vs. Motivation by SneakyG https://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-27536 SneakyG Sun, 4 Feb 2018 06:19:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/35/#comment-27536 Motive is the reason one does something. (i.e. reason for action)

Motivation is the reason one behaves a certain way. (i.e. reason for behavior/disposition)

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Comment on The Toronto Maple Leafs by macy https://painintheenglish.com/case/512/#comment-27535 macy Sun, 4 Feb 2018 02:58:20 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/512/#comment-27535 mattC,

It's "deer" and "sheep."

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Comment on Street Address vs. Mailing Address by richardwisecup https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-27534 richardwisecup Sat, 3 Feb 2018 20:56:24 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3604/#comment-27534 just because i am trying to enter street address wow

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Comment on “enamored with” and “enamored by” by Ed https://painintheenglish.com/case/4717/#comment-27533 Ed Sat, 3 Feb 2018 04:28:37 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4717/#comment-27533 No, and no — if you were a purist, you would use correct punctuation. In this case, that would mean including the period inside of the quotation of “enamored of.”

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Comment on “that” referring to a preceding phrase by Heewoo Kim https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27532 Heewoo Kim Wed, 31 Jan 2018 03:50:36 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27532 Kelly's comments are quite interesting.

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Comment on “that” referring to a preceding phrase by kellyjohnj https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27531 kellyjohnj Tue, 30 Jan 2018 08:57:03 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27531 In sentence 1, "that" refers to "rates of electricity generation," not simply "electricity generation." I agree with the commenter that said "those" would work; it is a plural we are talking about ("rates"). But I think "that" is fairly conventional, as used here.

For sentence 2, I am afraid we as a nation are susceptible to the same problem people experience everywhere--we think we are the center of everything and beyond us there is nothing. This is why we say "in KS," meaning that Kansas is a part of this great and total universe called the U.S., while we say "of" with respect to the U.S. total. There is no sense in our minds of the U.S. being part of anything else (such as the rest of the world). We are used to comparing parts of the U.S. to the whole. It comes with having a huge country and being a superpower. Once we compare KS to the whole country, we are done.

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Comment on What exactly is “width” in geometry? by kellyjohnj https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27530 kellyjohnj Tue, 30 Jan 2018 08:31:40 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27530 If you are talking about a rectangle, which is usually represented in a sort of landscape orientation, and describing the dimensions as width and length, it is only natural to use "length" to reference the longer side. It would be odd to have the shorter side described as length. This seems to me to be simply a convention in geometry. It doesn't have to make sense with English, Merriam-Webster or any other source. It just needs to be internally consistent within Geometry and to make sense with the terms that are chosen for the shapes. True, you can make a case that "width" doesn't appear to be used well here, but if it is paired with "length," I don't see a way around this outcome. Be comforted by the fact that this is walled off from the rest of the language and should cause no one any serious difficulty.

You might make a similar a similar complaint in graphing with the term "rise over run." Run is a bit ambiguous, as is width. But there is no mistaking what rise is on a graph.

Perhaps the confusion here CAN bleed into the "real" world. There are times I have been confused about a product description, for example, when two dimensions are simply described as a number by another number, such as 100 mm x 100 mm. Obviously a square, but if the numbers aren't equal, you might have to surmise what side the longer number refers to. I am sure there have been other instances. What I find is that the confusion is only me. The people in that business use these numbers all the time and there is no question about them. It helps me to get someone on the phone and discuss the product so I can become familiar with their jargon.

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Comment on “This Wednesday” vs. “Next Wednesday” by akinyele https://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-27527 akinyele Sun, 28 Jan 2018 09:12:25 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4650/#comment-27527 Depends on the point of the person asking and the person answering.
If you say this Wednesday, I would assume this coming Wednesday; especially if today is Sunday and you are conveying some info as to an event that will happen.
I have been a teacher in Japan for the past 15 years ,and for the Japanese , it's pretty hard for them to discern future events as well as coming events in English. So for them everything is last or now. This past weekend is a pain for them, the weekend after next goes right over their head.
Please, if you are going to convey this Wednesday, convey it so there is no confusion. This past Wednesday, or next Wednesday.

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Comment on Texted by Robert Lamont Barnette https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27526 Robert Lamont Barnette Wed, 24 Jan 2018 18:13:31 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3896/#comment-27526 "Did you text them/Yes, I texted them.
"Texted." That is the past tense of "text."
"Did you hurt yourself/Yes, I hurted myself" moment.

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Comment on people like she/he are... by ron3 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5677/#comment-27525 ron3 Mon, 22 Jan 2018 17:47:44 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5677/#comment-27525 Will someone please inform Ron Paul that English speakers like he are incorrect in this case?

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Comment on On Tomorrow by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27524 jayles Thu, 18 Jan 2018 09:10:44 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27524 KING HENRY
We are in God’s hand, brother, not in theirs.
March to the bridge. It now draws toward night.
Beyond the river we’ll encamp ourselves,
And on tomorrow bid them march away.
Henry V Act 3, Scene 6, Page 7

So Shakespeare used "poor grammar and .... stupid."

http://nfs.sparknotes.com/henryv/page_132.html

http://random-idea-english.blogspot.co.nz/2014/01/random-thoughts-about-on-tomorrow.html

It is perfectly normal to say "until tomorrow", "for tomorrow", "by tomorrow", "after tomorrow", so "on tomorrow" is not that much of a stretch.

http://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=on+tomorrow%2Ctomorrow_NOUN%2Ctomorrow_ADV%2Ctomorrow%2C_START_+Tomorrow%2CTomorrow_NOUN+*%2C*+tomorrow%2C+and+on+tomorrow&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Con%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Ctomorrow_NOUN%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Ctomorrow_ADV%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Ctomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2C_START_%20Tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2CTomorrow_NOUN%20%2A%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20%27s%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20I%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20we%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20is%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20morning%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20you%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20night%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20the%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20he%3B%2Cc0%3B%3BTomorrow_NOUN%20will%3B%2Cc0%3B.t2%3B%2C%2A%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%2Cs0%3B%3Bof%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bfor%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Band%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Byou%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bafter%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Buntil%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bthat%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bby%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bback%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B%3Bit%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Cand%20on%20tomorrow%3B%2Cc0

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Comment on On Tomorrow by kadrn https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27523 kadrn Wed, 17 Jan 2018 17:11:13 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27523 It is not correct to say on tomorrow, on yesterday, or on today. These words are adverbs and do not require the preposition "on". Prepositions require an object. Since days of the week are nouns, they are objects for prepositions. It is incorrect to assume it is OK to use 'on' with all expressions of time. The redundancy is not that the word 'to' is in tomorrow. The redundancy is that tomorrow, is an adverb that already designates a place in time, and does not require a preposition.

Although it has become common usage in some parts of the county to say 'on tomorrow (yesterday, today), it is poor grammar and makes even the most educated person sound stupid.

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27522 jayles Sat, 13 Jan 2018 17:48:52 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27522 https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=e.g.%2Ceg.%2Ceg&year_start=1960&year_end=2008&corpus=18&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Ce.g.%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Ceg%20.%3B%2Cc0%3B.t1%3B%2Ceg%3B%2Cc0

E.g. or e.g. is at least twelve times more common in the book corpus used by Google.
"Eg" or "EG" is sometimes an abbreviation for "electrogram", or "elliptical galaxy". For some reason, a few German texts are included in the Google books results, and these use "EG" to mean "Eingriff" and so forth. I have only sighted one valid example of "eg" being used to mean "for example" in this corpus.
From all this I would conclude that "e.g." is the norm.

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Comment on eg, e.g., or eg. by Bassclimber https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27521 Bassclimber Sat, 13 Jan 2018 04:29:19 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4723/#comment-27521 I have used eg and ie for a long time. Why waste space or time?
We don't write p.c. for a personal computer, l.e.d. of light emitting diode, etc. (yes, not e.t.c.). I also a agree with Peter X, we say e g, not e dot g dot. I am involved in writing Australian technical Standard, and always drive for efficiency and simplicity.

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Comment on On Tomorrow by scylla https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27520 scylla Tue, 9 Jan 2018 21:43:55 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/3919/#comment-27520 Thank you for this reference. As others have said, I have mostly heard this as Black usage in the South and find it a charming idiom, but I needed a discussion to reference about why I would leave "on" out when transcribing for reports.

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Comment on What exactly is “width” in geometry? by Rich Byrne https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27519 Rich Byrne Sun, 7 Jan 2018 00:45:51 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27519 It is a shame. There's an endless supply of self-satisfied fools in charge of education, and in charge of testing that education. The goal appears to be to ask the question is the minimum number of words, as though "question space" on the printed page is something of supreme importance.

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Comment on What exactly is “width” in geometry? by Phineas https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27517 Phineas Thu, 4 Jan 2018 04:29:35 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5834/#comment-27517 Another illustration of the confusion is with bathroom sinks. Some online vendor of sinks will call the front-to-back distance the width; others, the left-to-right distance.

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Comment on “that” referring to a preceding phrase by Airfoyle https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27516 Airfoyle Tue, 2 Jan 2018 21:41:36 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27516 First of all, you can't say "the U.S. total"; the proper phrase is "the entire U.S." The two numbered sentences should read:

1. The graphs above show the rates of electricity generation of Kansas and of the entire U.S. in 2010.
2. In 2010, the rate of electricity generation by nuclear power plants in Kansas was about the same as the rate for the entire U.S. [outside Kansas.]

In sentence 2, I've moved the date to the front of the sentence because otherwise it's too far from what it modifies.

That second sentence does not seem plausible, with or without the bracketed phrase. Do you mean "about the same as the rate for all other sources of energy in the entire U.S."?

In any case, I'm not tempted to use "that of" or "of that" in these sentences

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Comment on “It is what it is” by Michael Bauch https://painintheenglish.com/case/4284/#comment-27513 Michael Bauch Sun, 31 Dec 2017 04:10:23 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4284/#comment-27513 I teach a high-school equivalency test prep class for adults who didn't finish high school. Recently, I was reading over a student's essay in which she used "it is what it is". I'm so sick of hearing this empty, vague bit of bullshit that I circled the phrase and replied:
WHAT is what WHAT is?.

I know that my response was just as vague and unhelpful as this bit of trite street wisdom has become. I just wish that someone, anyone, would have the courage to step out from behind these empty words and state clearly what the "it" is that he or she is talking about.

Otherwise, they can shove "it" up their ass(es).

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by David Winfree https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27512 David Winfree Sat, 30 Dec 2017 15:18:38 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27512 There’s only one way to say it. PERIOD.
The sister of your mother is pronounced exactly the same as if she was a tiny creature living with a million others in a dirt hill

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Comment on “that” referring to a preceding phrase by Mike E. Karsonis https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27511 Mike E. Karsonis Fri, 29 Dec 2017 20:21:12 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5846/#comment-27511 Having read most comments,I agree that all three prepositions would work in the second sentence,though of sounds more modern so to speak.on another nore there are puzzling errors in both the questions and the comments offered.

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Kelvin Richardson https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27510 Kelvin Richardson Fri, 29 Dec 2017 13:40:49 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27510 Aunt should rhyme with "haunt" and "taunt." Raised in Southern California, but my family hails from Arkansas.

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Comment on Pronunciation: aunt by Helen Diane Smith https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27509 Helen Diane Smith Thu, 28 Dec 2017 16:04:21 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/585/#comment-27509 In my early years I grew up in West Texas and Aunt was replaced by the word "Aint", as in my Aint Peggy or Aint Sue. In my 60s now and living in NV. I can still call a relative in West Texas and hear "Aint
being used. I love it! Sounds like home to me...

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Comment on equivalency by pmoraga https://painintheenglish.com/case/5870/#comment-27507 pmoraga Thu, 21 Dec 2017 13:04:30 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/5870/#comment-27507 In Canada and the US, "equivalency" may seem more familiar than "equivalence" because it appears in the name of the certificate that people may earn instead of a high school diploma. The General Equivalency Diploma is often referred to by its initialism, GED.

Both "equivalency" and "equivalence" are nouns so the terms are, so to speak, equivalent (or equal).

I admit that I'm not an expert on New Zealand English, but I don't see any reason to change the author's original wording.

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Comment on LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect? by james2 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27506 james2 Thu, 21 Dec 2017 11:38:39 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/4639/#comment-27506 In the UK we use Lego singular and plural - which although is still not technically correct - is better than "Legos" (Chrome even knows the correct rule as I type this).

Please America, take the "s" of Lego and put it back on "math" where it belongs.

BTW - looks like it is you that needs a a proof reader - I know separate is a difficult word to spell - but it is usually the second vowel which is the issue not the first or lack of it!

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by Matthe Ware https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27505 Matthe Ware Tue, 19 Dec 2017 21:40:32 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27505 It's a clue from a Sunday newspaper crossword. I'm supposed to pick one that fits best even though both seem legit.

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by jayles https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27504 jayles Tue, 19 Dec 2017 17:12:08 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27504 @Matthe Ware
It sounds like a school test! To me either would be "correct"; in fact 'extensive assortment of diamonds' comes up about a dozen times as a phrase on google, but 'expensive...' does not, if that is a good criterion.

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Comment on Fora vs Forums by Matthe Ware https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27503 Matthe Ware Tue, 19 Dec 2017 16:37:10 +0000 https://painintheenglish.com/case/627/#comment-27503 Being wife of very wealthy tycoon, it's understandable that she's able to buy an _____assortment of diamonds.

What word best fits 'expensive' or 'extensive'?

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