Skeeter Lewis

Joined: March 16, 2012

Number of comments posted: 156

Number of votes received: 42

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

Medicine or Medication?

Recent Comments

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 6, 2013, 5:21am  •  0 vote

I'm half-Welsh, brought up in Lancashire, went to a public school and Oxford and speak RP. It's the half-tones in British life that make it so entertaining.

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 6, 2013, 3:26am  •  0 vote

I would say that RP is the accent associated with Oxbridge and the major public schools. The BBC accent is not RP, indeed Ed Stourton (Posh Ed) has suffered as a result and the former India correspond

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 5, 2013, 11:46am  •  0 vote

It's 'Received Pronunciation' - what in Britain is perceived as an 'educated' accent.

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 5, 2013, 4:17am  •  0 vote

Agreed. I'm English and I've never cared for the 'paw' rendering for 'poor'. 'Tour' can't possibly be 'taw' but many English people do say it that way.

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 4, 2013, 10:55pm  •  0 vote

Americans, I notice, drop the 'l' in solder. It comes out as 'soda'. This is old-fashioned English. The 'l' in 'soldier' was also dropped at one time. That's why Kipling, in his phonetic rendering of

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 4, 2013, 10:48pm  •  0 vote

Yes, "an 'otel" was correct Englisn until not so long ago. My 99-year-old mother-in-law still says it that way. "An hotel" is an absurdity. Good for the Americans with their " 'erb"! Cockneys are gr

Re: Someone else’s  •  January 4, 2013, 1:38am  •  0 vote

'Passers-by' and yet 'passer-by's'. I got an ignorant red squiggle because of that closing inverted comma!

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  January 2, 2013, 1:59am  •  0 vote

Other possibilities, I see belatedly, are 'petits cotes' (with accent) and 'petites gastelles'.

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  January 2, 2013, 1:48am  •  0 vote

In fact, the contribution of French to Scottish English would make an interesting thread in its own right. There is 'petticoat tails' from 'petits gateaux', for example and 'fash' - as in 'dinna fash

Re: Past tense of “text”  •  January 2, 2013, 1:29am  •  0 vote

'Brings in', blast it.

Re: Past tense of “text”  •  January 2, 2013, 1:22am  •  1 vote

'Text' is 'written', surely? 'I wrote you a text.' Back in the real world, though - yes, it's 'texted'. New technology - like the printing press in days of yore - always bring in new words.

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 1, 2013, 10:47am  •  1 vote

'Inform' is nice and simple 'Envision' is virtually unknown in British use but it's the standard American word. The other two - either way.

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  January 1, 2013, 8:02am  •  0 vote

'Gardez l'eau' may be a popular etymology like 'Port Out Starboard Home'.

Re: intend on doing?  •  December 31, 2012, 11:38am  •  0 vote

I know, Jasper. This forum needs an 'edit'.

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  December 30, 2012, 9:43pm  •  0 vote

Most terms in 'polite' use are euphemisms - restroom, bathroom, public conveniences, lavatory, toilet - even latrine, which is also to do with washing. Other people's euphemisms always seem more ludic

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  December 25, 2012, 12:02am  •  0 vote

Will - I would not presume to cast doubt on your learning, which is evident. Perhaps it's simply that some of us are slower than others to accept change. The reasons for that are too various to be pin

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  December 24, 2012, 1:06pm  •  0 vote

Of course many Brits use 'different to'. I hear them doing so. But for my generation it's a solecism. I am forever starting sentences with a conjunction, Will, solecism or not. Nobody's perfect...

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  December 24, 2012, 4:58am  •  2 votes

'Different to' is still avoided by educated Britons. The fact that it's used on the B.B.C. doesn't surprise me.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  December 10, 2012, 1:31am  •  1 vote

I have never in my life heard 'pled' being used by a Brit. It's not wrong - it's just not British English. Yes - I just got a squiggly line.

Re: “He gave it to Michelle and I”  •  December 1, 2012, 11:55am  •  0 vote

Okay, objective....

Re: “He gave it to Michelle and I”  •  December 1, 2012, 11:52am  •  0 vote

Prepositions take the accusative..

Re: Heaven or heaven?  •  November 27, 2012, 1:58am  •  0 vote

Percy - thanks for your post. It's an interesting point about there being only one heaven and hell and thus the need for lower case. On the other hand there's only one 'Earth'.

Re: Heaven or heaven?  •  November 27, 2012, 1:50am  •  1 vote

The word 'city' is not capitalized but the British refer to the old part of London (now the financial quarter) as 'the City'. That's because a particular place is being referred to. Titles are the sam

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 10, 2012, 6:49am  •  0 vote

" If I was the prime minister" suggests that he can't remember if he held that office. And I thought I had a short attention span.

Re: Verb-tense agreement for a quote that is still true  •  November 10, 2012, 6:41am  •  0 vote

You're right, Will. Many authorities acknowledge backshifting, as I noted. It's just that it seems to defy logic. Perhaps it was an idiomatic use that has gained acceptance.

Re: Verb-tense agreement for a quote that is still true  •  November 6, 2012, 11:16am  •  0 vote

You don't need to backshift with universal truths, e.g. "Copernicus said that the earth revolves around the sun." The phrase 'sequence of tenses' is the standard term. Fowler described the use of the

Re: Verb-tense agreement for a quote that is still true  •  November 5, 2012, 9:43am  •  0 vote

It's not relevant that the situation still exists. Her statement was in the past and that's where it has to stay - all of it. Hey Will, it's time we agreed on something.

Re: Resume, resumé, or résumé?  •  November 3, 2012, 2:25pm  •  0 vote

Caché? Did someone write that?

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 2, 2012, 1:30pm  •  0 vote

This question has been around for a long time. Let me quote from 'The Complete Plain Words' by Sir Ernest Gowers: 'Have got', for 'possess' or 'have', says Fowler, is good colloquial but not good lit

Re: Pronunciation: aunt  •  November 2, 2012, 12:45am  •  0 vote

As an Englishman, I've heard 'ant' and 'ahnt'. There is certainly a class component in the UK. (It's hard to get away from it.) 'Ahnt' is middle and upper class.'Ant' is working class. That's not a ju

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  November 1, 2012, 1:59pm  •  0 vote

Will Thanks for your response. I agree that differences between AmerE and BritE have something to do with it. I also agree with your comments on Ella, who can do no wrong. I am starting to repeat m

Re: Loose = Lose?  •  November 1, 2012, 1:49pm  •  1 vote

It's odd that 'to' and 'too' are confused so much on line, as in "He went to far." It's very minor. It's just rum that it happens so much. Crumble, we just enjoy language here. We like kicking the su

Re: I’ve no idea  •  November 1, 2012, 1:47am  •  1 vote

Interesting, Partial. Perhaps it's a question of the distinction between a main verb and an auxiliary verb. Chambers describes the latter as 'a verb that helps to form the mood, tense or voice of an

Re: I’ve no idea  •  October 30, 2012, 10:08pm  •  0 vote

'I've no idea' is fine because there is no emphasis on 'have'. 'I've to go' doesn't work because you need emphasis on the 'have' to express an obligation. Thank you for your post, Ramon. Non-nativ

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  October 30, 2012, 9:56pm  •  0 vote

The vogue for pronounceable acronyms has swept the board. In the past, though, pronounceability was not necessary. Things change.

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 28, 2012, 8:39am  •  0 vote

Yes Hairy, I'll have to teach my keyboard who's boss. 'Eventuate' is a good example of a fancy synonym but my point was rather that 'documentation' (for example) was a furnishing or application of t

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 28, 2012, 12:38am  •  0 vote

There I go again with the spelling mistake. Time for me to shut up for a while.

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 28, 2012, 12:36am  •  0 vote

Everyone says 'usage' to mean 'use' but that doesn't mean I have to like it. Why leakage? What's wrong with leak? Maybe I've returned to me nonage.

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 28, 2012, 12:18am  •  0 vote

Signs Signage....Nice one, Hairy.

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 27, 2012, 10:01am  •  0 vote

Sound 'off', blast it. Why does one always make a spelling mistake when laying down the law on English?

Re: I dove my hat  •  October 26, 2012, 8:18am  •  0 vote

"I dove my hat" is not English. It's 'doffed'. I believe that 'don' is a contraction of 'do on' and 'doff' is a contraction of 'do off'.

Re: Reason Why  •  October 26, 2012, 8:02am  •  0 vote

The phrase 'the reason why', as pointed out, has a long history but is it correct? I would say "the reason that I am late..." or "the reason for my lateness..." "The cancellation of the train is the

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  October 26, 2012, 4:59am  •  0 vote

Hi Will, I see you got there first. I missed your comment on Durham.

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  October 26, 2012, 4:57am  •  0 vote

Gayla is, I believe, an earlier pronunciation that lives on in the UK only in the north of England. It is the Durham Miners' Gayla. Elsewhere in the UK gahla prevails.

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 26, 2012, 4:19am  •  0 vote

My apologies, Agustin, for talking rubbish. 'Who' is the subjective form and 'whom' is the objective form. Perhaps you knew that and were simply saying that it's okay to say 'who' informally in the ob

Re: Rules for -ise and -ize  •  October 26, 2012, 3:26am  •  0 vote

Our grandfathers and great grandfathers in Britain used the 'ize' spelling. It's strange that we went over to the Frenchified 'ise'. I hope we return to the correct 'ize' form.

Re: “in regards to”  •  October 26, 2012, 2:51am  •  0 vote

All these 'regards' phrases sound a bit laboured to me, the sorts of phrase people use to give a gloss of officialness. I'd say, 'as to'.

Re: First Generation vs. Second Generation  •  October 26, 2012, 2:05am  •  0 vote

The traditional use of 'first generation' refers to those born in America. Immigrants weren't generated in America. They came here.

Re: Abbreviation of “number”  •  October 25, 2012, 4:37pm  •  0 vote

For those of my generation (ahem) the plural is nos. either with a capital or without. It's a usage I haven't seen in quite a while.

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 25, 2012, 4:24pm  •  0 vote

There is a surprising assertion above from Agustin. "Whom is the formal way of saying who." 'Who ' is the nominative form, 'whom' is the accusative.

Re: obliged or obligated?  •  October 25, 2012, 4:04pm  •  1 vote

I was about to suggest that Americans enjoy the fancy longer word, for example 'burglarize' instead of 'burgle' but then I realised that we Brits say 'acclimatise' and Americans say 'acclimate'. So I

Re: obliged or obligated?  •  October 25, 2012, 4:01pm  •  0 vote

I was about to suggest that Americans enjoy the fancy longer word, for example 'burglarize' instead of 'burgle' but then I realised that we Brits say 'acclimatise' and Americans say 'acclimate'. So I

Re: obliged or obligated?  •  October 25, 2012, 3:52pm  •  1 vote

The words 'oblige' and 'obligate' both have a long history but the simple fact is that the Americans seem to prefer 'obligate' and the British 'oblige'.

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 25, 2012, 3:41pm  •  0 vote

It is not only I who think.... You are saying, "I think so-and -so and I am not the only one."

Re: Capitalizing After the Colon  •  July 21, 2012, 8:26pm  •  1 vote

Yes - nice point, D.A. I should have learned by now never to say 'never', although titles fall under a different category. At the moment I am reading 'Cuba Libre' by that master of stripped-down Engl

Re: Capitalizing After the Colon  •  March 16, 2012, 3:02am  •  1 vote

Capitalization is never used, under any circumstances whatsoever, after a colon or a semi-colon in British English.

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