D. A. Wood

Joined: November 7, 2011

Number of comments posted: 258

Number of votes received: 35

No user description provided.

Questions Submitted

Latest vs. Newest

Molotov Cocktails

“Much More Ready”

Recent Comments

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 29, 2012, 12:54pm  •  0 vote

Why is that many writers, expecially ones who live in the low numbers of longitude, go about writing long words like "further" and "additional" when the short words "more" and "extra" work just fine?

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 29, 2012, 11:58am  •  0 vote

The people should have pled guilty to this. I had some kind of a problem with the services of some company. (Actually, this has happened with numerous companies.) When I made contact with the

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 29, 2012, 11:31am  •  0 vote

Now, we have to put up with mangled English like this: "Man plunges I - 85 overpass outside Atlanta" The writer(s) had no idea that "to plunge" like this is an intransive verb. On the

Re: “hack” in “hackathon”  •  May 29, 2012, 11:29am  •  0 vote

Always go back to the roots. Follow Anglo-Saxon all the way back to German and find the verb "hacken". Look that one up in the right kind of dictionary and find out what it means.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 7:09pm  •  0 vote

More people who should have pled guilty to the gods of language: The people who wrote a new TV commercial about how a certain model of car is "bringing the future forward". Holy Cow. What I w

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 2:43pm  •  0 vote

Concerning: "More likely to be a modern construct to do with Puritan idealists coming to make a fresh, clean start in the New World two thousand years later, in the 17th century." Sorry, but Penn

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 1:49pm  •  0 vote

The Egyptian connection with that or those Greek words has to do with the old, old practice of Egyptian noblemen marrying their sisters, impregnating them, and having children with them. EGAD! That wa

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 1:33pm  •  0 vote

That is a pharmaceutical ad having to do with pain medication. "Imagine you, feeling no pain." (Ugh!) Of course, your Irish and Scottish have their ways of feeling no pain: Irish whiskey and

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 11:17am  •  0 vote

Many of the important (and long) avenues of Washington, D.C., are named for various states of the Union, but not all of them. For example, there are major avenues named for Connecticut, Florida, Georg

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 10:53am  •  0 vote

I have visited the Embassy of New Zealand in Washington, D.C. I went there because I want to look through a newspaper from Auckland, and the staff members there were most happy to let me do so. [I hav

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 10:17am  •  0 vote

Re: "Everyone deserves our best." I hope they pleaded not guilty to your charge. Everyone (the audience) deserves our (the station's best), surely? Let me be clear and confirm the fact that "our"

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 28, 2012, 9:48am  •  0 vote

Oh, there are place names here that were crafted by white people out of components from both Native American and European components. There are also some that white people created "out of thin air" ju

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 27, 2012, 9:35pm  •  0 vote

Aha, we have places here that were named by the Native Americans, including cities and entire states where they lived. Tuscaloosa, Alabama, was named for a courageous Indian chief of western Alabama

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 27, 2012, 8:54pm  •  0 vote

Re: "the Atlantic's waters are deep." Something that so many people cannot grasp -- and especially British people -- is that inanimate objects do not have any possessive case because inanimate obje

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 1:24pm  •  0 vote

Note that I wrote "North America" for a reason because anything that is broadcast across the United States automatically arrives in Canada, too, and especilly in the big Canadian cities such as Montre

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 1:08pm  •  0 vote

A new TV commercial, written by the uneducated and the lazy, has just been telecast in North America. One of its sentences says, "Everyone deserves our best." Our? Our? Our? That is not only wrong

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 12:57pm  •  0 vote

"The waters of the Atlantic Ocean became his final resting place..." illustrates nothing ??? Well, nothing but a sentence with singular nouns all the way through from beginning to end. As for your

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 10:24am  •  0 vote

Oh, I ought to mention: the response that I got from that TV station was words to the effect of "fiddle-dee-dee". I did point out that Birmingham is the location of a major state university, an im

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 9:57am  •  0 vote

I have written to a TV station in Birmingham, Alabama, that has made a commercial that "toots on a big horn" about the supposed abilities of its people who appear in its broadcasts (news, weather repo

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 26, 2012, 9:30am  •  0 vote

"The headquarters of the British Commonwealth is in London, England." Of course, the subject of this sentence is "headquarters", but I am pleased to read that even in Great Britain, "the Commonwealth

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 5:57pm  •  0 vote

Most German words that are moden creations have been given "natural" grammatical gender. Hence there are lots of modern words like these: das Auto, das Bakterium, das Benzin (gasoline or petrol), da

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 4:45pm  •  0 vote

Well, which is it ?? A news announcer on the CBS station in Birmingham, Alabama, said, "The headquarters are..." I tend to disagree. "Headquarters" is a collective noun,

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 12:13pm  •  0 vote

Oh, dear. You mean "I love driving my Jaguar. She is a car which comes from England." I don't see any point in using "which" instead of "that'. In North American English, "that" is a perfectly-good

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 11:28am  •  0 vote

I said: "Most words in English that have a gender" Most nouns in English do not have any grammatical gender at at all. That is something that was disposed of during the couple of centuries follo

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 9:07am  •  0 vote

I noticed this morning that I was using a spell-checker that does not recognize the word "catsup". It flags this as a misspelled word -- and most users jump to the conclusion that it really IS misspel

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 24, 2012, 8:53am  •  0 vote

"It's true that some people will try to sound more intelligent by attempting to be verbose. This can cause quite a distraction during conversation." During a conversation?? No, they WRITE IT ALL D

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 23, 2012, 10:37am  •  0 vote

That onethat you wrote, Angie's, is quite wordy and full of syllables. You must have missed out on everything about communicating efficiently. That is just like the current craze for saying "corre

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 16, 2012, 12:32pm  •  0 vote

Great news on cable TV news in the U.S. this afternoon: "Three indicted co-conspirators have PLED guilty..." This was concerning a plot to commit an act of large-scale terrorism in New York Ci

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 11, 2012, 4:29pm  •  0 vote

Agent 99 never had another name besides "Agent 99". Also, I don't think that The Chief had another name besides "The Chief". On their first meeting, Agent 99 and Agent 86 were supposed to meet in

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 11, 2012, 4:16pm  •  0 vote

Agent 86, Maxwell Smart, said to a group of agents of KAOS: 1. In one hour, this island will be invaded by General Ridgeway and 50 crack paratroopers. 2. Would you believe by J. Edgar Hoover and

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 11, 2012, 4:09pm  •  0 vote

"pleaded"... in both AmE and BrE and always the best choice... Whoever considers that to be true does not known anything about Information Theory. Of course, the British have a great deal a

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 7, 2012, 7:19am  •  0 vote

The words "surf" and "browse" are just as short as is "cruise" (in syllables), so there is no efficiency in using "cruise". I also "link" to the Internet, so one cannot do any better than this in

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  April 7, 2012, 5:34am  •  1 vote

Wow, A reporter for NBC - TV news in the U.S.A. said this morning: "He has pled not guilty to charges of ..." The sweet sound of good, concise English, well spoken, entered

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 25, 2012, 1:00pm  •  0 vote

I am a son of American TV from the 1960s, especially. When it comes to programs like these, if it happened, I usually remember it: Emergency!, Get Smart, Gilligan's Island, Hogan's Heroes, The

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 25, 2012, 12:40pm  •  0 vote

Now, I am reminded of a comedy routine in the "Get Smart" TV series when someone was giving Agent 86 directions on how to drive somewhere. These included: "Go over the underpass and then under the

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 25, 2012, 12:30pm  •  0 vote

Here is some good news about language from this morning: Nora O'Donnell on the "Face the Nation" TV program said: "Let's listen." - which is a very fine phrase that has stood the test of time.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 25, 2012, 12:25pm  •  0 vote

So many people are so passive nowadays, and they accept this w/o any complaint: To CBS TV: On the SUNDAY MORNING program today, NOT "more risky" as your man said, but rather "riskier".

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 25, 2012, 12:19pm  •  0 vote

PLED, PLED, PLED! Four letters rather than seven, and one syllable rather than two -- much more efficient on both counts. Also, here in the U.S.A., we have two famous and scenic Carlsbads: Carlsb

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 24, 2012, 3:45pm  •  0 vote

OUCH: A typical date for Brus: He spent a lot of his money on much-younger women; took her for a ride in his expensive sports car; took her out to dinner at an expensive restaurant where he ate wa

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 24, 2012, 11:12am  •  0 vote

So, are you an "old fool" or not? LOL You remind me of a happening in "The Incredible Hulk" TV series. David Banner had hitched a ride with a man on a motorcycle. Then, they went to a pub near

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 24, 2012, 9:37am  •  1 vote

It occurred to me last night that some people do not know the humor behind "There's no fuel like an old fuel." This is a twist on a saying that has been around for centuries: "There's no fool l

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 24, 2012, 9:13am  •  0 vote

"Presumably, the Air Force has lots of jet packs." In reality -- and on "Gilligan's Island" -- the jet pack was completely experimental and those were never widely produced. Also in reality, I

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 23, 2012, 4:30pm  •  0 vote

"Aye, D.A., ye're fair going your dinger the nicht, as we say in Scotland. Are you on the malt too?" LOL, LOL, LOL !

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 23, 2012, 4:29pm  •  0 vote

I don't guarantee that I got all of the endings on the German adjectives right. Sorry, but in German the usage of nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, pronouns, and verbs are all a lot more compl

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 23, 2012, 4:10pm  •  0 vote

Hello, I had realized that there was something awkward about what I wrote before: "I recently saw an episode of 'Gilligan's Island' from a DVD that I bought. In that episode, the castaways found

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 12:27pm  •  0 vote

LOL, when it comes to using "pleaded" instead of "pled". I recently saw an episode of Gilligan's Island from a DVD that I bought. In that episode, the castaways found a jet pack washed up on the b

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 11:16am  •  1 vote

It is well-known among linguists and child psychologists that most small children (ages two through four, or so), go through a period when they think that all verbs are regular verbs. I noticed the

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 10:54am  •  1 vote

I once knew a man from Indonesia who had lived in the United States for years. He was earning a B.S. at the college where I taught, and he was the husband of one of the other members of the faculty.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 10:28am  •  0 vote

Hello: "Lowbrow" has been one word for a long time, at least in North American English. www.dictionary.com says that it came into use in about 1902 in the United States. Speaking of lowbrow, I

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 9:51am  •  0 vote

Note: "able to fly". I left out a word. D.A.W.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  March 20, 2012, 9:49am  •  0 vote

Tim, you are so right about "pled". However, when it comes to "nuclear" there are three syllables. See this Web page: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/nuclear?s=t The pronunciation of nuc

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  February 17, 2012, 6:18am  •  0 vote

Also, strong dialects of English in the U.S. died out during the 1940s and 50s. The experience of World War II, the Korean War, and the advances in telecommunictation -- and especially television, kil

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  February 17, 2012, 6:08am  •  1 vote

Hello, "Why Bother", It sounds like you never have met many Indian people in person, I have. 1. Many Indians, Pakistanis, etc., THINK that they speak English, but they do not.I have heard this w

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  February 16, 2012, 6:12pm  •  1 vote

That problem with speakers and writers, especially British ones, not being able to distinguish between singular and plural is an especially ghastly one. Here is an example that I read in a news ar

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  February 16, 2012, 10:10am  •  0 vote

I don't believe what Editirixrex said one bit. Also, it is beside the point. The original question was raised about what is said on AMERICAN TV STATIONS, so British English is irrelevant here in this

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  November 7, 2011, 10:52pm  •  3 votes

Reply to lloyola: "I turned off the sitcom. If, however, I turn off everything that offends me in the same manner, I will be left with nothing but the History Channel." This year, I have become q

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