masrowan

Joined: January 8, 2010  (email not validated)

Number of comments posted: 22

Number of votes received: 16

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Recent Comments

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 15, 2011, 9:37pm  •  1 vote

Well, it's nominative, since it's a predicate nominative following a linking verb, renaming or explaining the subject which, in "This is she," is "This." If you read the postings from January 2010, a

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  July 22, 2010, 4:47pm  •  0 vote

Dang! The name of home before dark disappeared out of my posting, to wit: ". . . waving to home before dark in Lawrence, Kansas . . ."

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  July 22, 2010, 4:44pm  •  0 vote

But in so doing, you don't inform the caller of your identity. "Yes" merely means that the caller may, indeed, speak to the asked for person. Of course, one can choose to melodically intone, "Yes.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 20, 2010, 12:23am  •  1 vote

Probably some usage writers feel that "ain't" isn't worth bothering about, and they may, indeed, be right. I guess I'm back to the old "isn't the discussion of such what the site is about anyway?" A

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 19, 2010, 10:10pm  •  1 vote

Douglas said, "Really Marilyn? That old canard? I'm loath to cock a snook at even so learned a maven as you, but "lay versus lie" is not so much a grammatical issue as a social one." Well, Dougl

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 18, 2010, 10:15pm  •  1 vote

Anyone interested in taking on forms of the verbs "lay" and "lie," two of the most frequently misused verbs by the "educated"?

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 18, 2010, 9:13am  •  1 vote

Your point is well made, and I quite agree. To me, it is sad that those meanings are lost. I gave only one example. I fully realize that semantic change happens, and we can use the words we choose

Re: Talking through your hat  •  January 17, 2010, 2:45pm  •  0 vote

First of all, Fawn Brodie's book is fascinating and insightful. That aside, I had thought the phrase was "talking 'through' one's hat, meaning concerning things about which the speaker is not truly k

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 15, 2010, 11:14am  •  0 vote

Come to think of it, what goes on here is "hobknobbery" [sic] of a sort, though I'm fairly certain that wasn't the original intent of the remark.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 15, 2010, 9:00am  •  1 vote

Oooooooo, Douglas, love your use of the word "mad"! It seems that John and I have become the pedantic website version of reality TV. And the original question -- something about how many angels can

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 2:35pm  •  1 vote

Yes, and perhaps they were right, as the "feet" translators were not.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 2:08pm  •  1 vote

Well, for example 1, probably. For # 2, I could see the definition going either way. With the Biblical quote, it's a translation. There are ever theologians arguing about the correct translation of

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 1:37pm  •  1 vote

Well, I traced "stark mad," as in "completely mad" to John Skelton 1489, and that's with the modifier. The reference defines this as "completely insane." "Raving mad" comes in later, and finally "st

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 11:11am  •  1 vote

Yes, but the rage that accompanies madness. It may be a fine point, but with mad now meaning only angry to most people, mad meaning insane is being lost. I'm fine with the branching out of words, bu

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 10:25am  •  0 vote

Yes. I am aware of that.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 9:50am  •  1 vote

Good to know. Thanks, John. I just checked several sources; some gave only one, and some gave both choices. When only one choice was listed, it was "beaten." And then too, there are always the diff

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 8:56am  •  0 vote

As a colloquial expression, "cannot be beat" is used. However, "beat" is an irregular verb: present tense -- beat, simple past tense -- beat, past participle[with helping verbs]-- beaten. Therefore,

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 14, 2010, 8:55am  •  0 vote

As a colloquial expression, "cannot be beat" is used. However, "beat" is an irregular verb: present tense -- beat, simple past tense -- beat, past participle[with helping verbs]-- beaten. Therefore,

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 13, 2010, 7:35pm  •  1 vote

Depends on the text, and on the standardized tests, only "It is she" is correct, due to the reasons stated above. However, down the road I descry a gent coming with the wagon from the glue factory.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 13, 2010, 5:37pm  •  1 vote

My point about the triangle had to do with the "term" triangle. It, too, could have been called a Fred. I realize that the rules of mathematics are fixed, but the language could change, though that'

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 13, 2010, 3:12pm  •  1 vote

Hmmmmm! Well, yes. The distinctions are or were at their formation, indeed, arbitrary; nonetheless, to say they make "no difference AT All," isn't quite true. Language, after all, is simply a conve

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  January 8, 2010, 1:06pm  •  2 votes

Totally and completely incorrect! Objects of the sentence/verb follow action verbs [mailed,talk,thought, did], not linking verbs [is, are, was]. The object of the verb answers the question "who" or