jayles

Joined: August 12, 2010

Number of comments posted: 733

Number of votes received: 70

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Recent Comments

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 10:59pm  •  0 vote

@HS You are mistaken in your deductions. I just never watch cricket at all, TV or live, alhough "footie" is another matter. The pron just does not bother me - not even "chintz" for "chance" - there ar

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 8:07pm  •  0 vote

I sit corrected - although the notion that someone's pron could be "superior" is perhaps inherently flawed.

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 8:00pm  •  0 vote

Just one more thing: in my life I encounter various Sanskrit terminology almost every day, and I'm pretty sure the pron is anglicized, but so what if we are in an "officially-English" speaking country

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 7:13pm  •  0 vote

Perhaps I should outline one technique which over time tends to improve pronunciation awareness. Basically one needs to force the situation where the listener doesn't just gloss over or pretend to und

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 6:52pm  •  0 vote

"trailing scwa." SB trailing schwa - as in "You speak-e to my wif-e; I kill-e you"

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 6:49pm  •  2 votes

As a matter of fact, over the past few years I have had several students from India and Ceylon, some with Gujurati as their first tongue, some with Tamil, and other "Indian" languages. Generally they

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 28, 2014, 6:38pm  •  0 vote

@HS Given the PC world in which we live, one would try not to give offence, which usually means pronouncing these things as close a possible to the original. In your case let people with mana be your

Re: “Anglish”  •  March 25, 2014, 6:37pm  •  0 vote

@AnWulf Thanks. All I could find was "frame" but that seems well and truly dead in the meaning of benefit.

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 20, 2014, 6:17pm  •  0 vote

@WW you meant "@Jasper" ?

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 20, 2014, 5:31am  •  0 vote

@Jasper yes; using "Q" to mean "question word" doesn't really work. Perhaps just better to start with a question mark like: ?SVO = Who hit the teacher? ?OxSV = Who did the teacher hit? ?TxSVO = Whe

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 19, 2014, 7:13pm  •  0 vote

@WW BTW I've never really sorted out how to write up ; "Who hit the teacher?" "Who did the teacher hit?"

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 19, 2014, 6:58pm  •  0 vote

@WW Confirmed. Or just write it up as SxMV[OPT] if sts don't know 'pp' already. The point here is one could say: "She walked her dog quickly down the street at dusk" => SV[OMPT] ; or "She quickly

Re: What does “Curb your dog” mean?  •  March 18, 2014, 5:38pm  •  0 vote

So they really do have kerbs in Oz? Just in the settlements?

Re: “Anglish”  •  March 18, 2014, 5:33pm  •  0 vote

Benefit: what was the middle English word for this? In wills and conveyancing the phrase " to the use and behoof of someone" was standard usage until 20th century; but nowadays using "behoof" outsid

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 14, 2014, 1:48pm  •  0 vote

Also you need to change the timespan to 1800 to 2008 to get ADP results

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 14, 2014, 1:46pm  •  0 vote

@HS+J a bit criyptic, yes; mea culpa. Go to: books.google.com/ngrams copy and paste in : Monday_*,_ADP_ Monday,monday_* and you will get a graph breaking down the book usage of monday by p

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 13, 2014, 7:47pm  •  0 vote

Keying in; Monday_* , _ADP_Monday to the ngram view suggests plain adverb is a minority usage.

Re: “admits to”  •  March 12, 2014, 3:40am  •  0 vote

@HS Friends and family live on as long as we remember them. And in their children. Sometimes I play "Stranger on the Shore" in rememberance of a long-ago friend who played clarinet: at the going-do

Re: “admits to”  •  March 11, 2014, 10:21pm  •  0 vote

Only then is one admitted TO heaven.

Re: “admits to”  •  March 11, 2014, 10:17pm  •  0 vote

@HS Up at the pearly gates St M checks your latest tax return, takes away your credit cards and passes you on to St P, who checks your grammar, so PP should be okay; unless of course St P has gone fi

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 11, 2014, 6:27pm  •  0 vote

@WW I just use plain SV[OPT} 95% of the time. Romance and Germanic languages are usually Time-Manner-Place TMP as opposed to English often MPT, and VO unsplittable. Slav languages tend to put old in

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 10, 2014, 9:08pm  •  0 vote

@WW all a bit too academic for me; in teaching I just use SV[OPT] to represent a clause, as in "Although SV[OPT], SV[OPT]."; and with add-ins as needed like: QxSV[OPT]? or SVOMPT or SxMpp[OPT] - for

Re: A New Correlative Conjunction?  •  March 9, 2014, 6:29pm  •  0 vote

English has been described as a residual verb-comes-second (V2) tongue. Thus we can say: a. Most sought are upper-income people, who tend to keep large balances wth the bank. (from Birner 1995: 239)

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 6, 2014, 6:28pm  •  0 vote

If one wishes to teach "grammar" a little more directly, one can set a task like: "A friend of mine says there are thirteen meaningful ways to join together the two sentences "Roses are red' and 'Vio

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 6, 2014, 6:12pm  •  0 vote

Often one does not need to teach grammar as such; just select a befitting topic to elicit it. For instance, to elicit "third" conditionals, topics like:- "What effect did the British occupation have

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 5, 2014, 7:07am  •  0 vote

@WW no offence intended, Geordie or Glaswegian both incomprehensible to me, but good English nevertheless. In truth one's the grammar of one's natural English dialect is the one that makes most sense

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 4, 2014, 9:40pm  •  0 vote

De grammaticae eruditione: The first thing we would need to establish is what is the purpose of learning grammar; what are the aims, goals, and objectives? We can hardly determine this without discuss

Re: apostrophe with expressions of distance or time  •  March 3, 2014, 4:07am  •  0 vote

If you look on wikipedia possessive apostrophe it gives the historical background and says that the convention did not become established until the nineteenth yearhundred. What I think is happening

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 7:04pm  •  0 vote

timor tui incomprehensionis ironiae meae conturbat me

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 6:12pm  •  0 vote

cum essem parvulus loquebar ut parvulus sapiebam ut parvulus cogitabam ut parvulus tuncque didici linguam populi Romae factusque sum vir

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 6:05pm  •  0 vote

Lingua populi Romae lingua deorum semper non oblita atque non oblitanda saluatio omnibus ominbusque problemis humanis...

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 5:56pm  •  0 vote

Fortisan si omnes illi incolii...

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 5:54pm  •  0 vote

Fortisan si toti illi incolii olim apsumebent sui dies grammatica linguae latinis eruditione, omnibus minor tempora esset in vicis alii populi necare. An fortasse nos seniores in irreale praeterito ha

Re: Semicolon between sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction  •  February 27, 2014, 5:58pm  •  0 vote

@WW after an intial spike 1800-1820, it just wanders along till 2000 where it suddenly rises back to the initial levels. Works in Firefox

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 27, 2014, 5:45pm  •  0 vote

The map is on Wikipedia under "treaty of trianon" https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/e/ea/Ethnographic_map_of_hungary_1910_by_teleki_carte_rouge.jpg Note the area covered is "Greater

Re: take it on/off and put it on/off  •  February 27, 2014, 5:34pm  •  0 vote

@WW yes Polish is like Russian (apart from the script) ; your examples sound almost the same: ходить / входить / выходить / приходить; and the prefixes are inseparable - same in Latin/French/Spanish

Re: take it on/off and put it on/off  •  February 26, 2014, 9:20pm  •  0 vote

Hungarian itself has phrasal verbs - "meg" or "el" often correspond to "up" in English, giving a perfective, or sense of completion. Unfortunately, "put on clothes" in Hungarian is more like "dress up

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 26, 2014, 8:47pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper Parts of western Ukraine were at one time part of Poland =- Lviv (or Lvow) for example was annexed by the Soviet Union in 1939. Other bits were part of the (Austro) Hungarian Empire until the

Re: Semicolon between sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction  •  February 26, 2014, 5:23pm  •  0 vote

@WW "for_CONJ_" on Ngram shows a marked resurgence over the past decade, which threw me. However, I have just realized this might be skewed by republication of old books. The real reason for my aski

Re: Semicolon between sentences joined by a coordinating conjunction  •  February 25, 2014, 5:41pm  •  0 vote

Perhaps I could raise the matter of "for" as a conjunction. "Wow I am glad and happy too; for I was late for this discussion." Or is "for" as a conjunction now deprecated.

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 25, 2014, 5:38pm  •  0 vote

Amen brethren. In an unguarded unthinking non-PC moment in the supermarket I automatically waved back to a small child instead of turning away PC-wise ... it's just not 1960 anymore. I have also not

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 18, 2014, 5:25pm  •  0 vote

@WW etymonline.com suggests : upon the soden (1550s) and this does show up as such on google, although I couldn't quite get an exact date earlier than 1591.

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 17, 2014, 9:00pm  •  0 vote

I wonder by my troth, what thou and I Did, till we googled? and texted?

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 17, 2014, 6:09pm  •  0 vote

@WW Can't remember Dryden but didn't Donne go like: What did we do till we googled? For God's sake hold your tongue and let me google...

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 17, 2014, 6:05pm  •  0 vote

http://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2008/02/sudden-life.html

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 17, 2014, 1:43pm  •  0 vote

@WW evidently failed to convert. How about: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/all-of-a-sudden.html

Re: all _____ sudden  •  February 15, 2014, 1:59am  •  0 vote

MyLord, "All the sudden" comes up in the London Magazine from 1738 and "all of the sudden" in John Dryden. Try googling the phrases.

Re: Two Weeks Notice  •  February 15, 2014, 1:52am  •  0 vote

@WW "saint valentines day" with no apostrophe comes up in Hamlet. According to Ngram the possessive sans apostrophe has upticked since 1980. Of course Warner Bros knew their etymology and thus sinc

Re: Two Weeks Notice  •  February 14, 2014, 5:18pm  •  0 vote

Perhaps leaving off the apostrophe is because some people can't be bothered to find it on the keyboard. (This might also apply to commas.)

Re: “The plants were withered” Adjective or passive?  •  February 12, 2014, 8:26pm  •  0 vote

"Bore" is listed in longmans and wiktionary as transitive/intransitive in its literal meaning, but only transitive in its metaphorical sense. Thus "I am boring" (as a verb) means making a hole; but

Re: who vs. whom  •  February 12, 2014, 8:11pm  •  0 vote

Putting the following _ADP_ whom , _ADP_ who in to the Ngram viewer of usage in books shows that even in writing the use of whom has been declining, although for some reason it it not matched by a

Re: Shall have done?  •  February 7, 2014, 6:04pm  •  0 vote

@WW I tend to agree.My understanding of Ngram is that the incidence of 'shall' is declining on both sides of the Atlantic, and American usage is no more or less than Brit, in writing at least.

Re: Shall have done?  •  February 6, 2014, 6:45pm  •  0 vote

Often it is hard to tell whether it is shall or will as it is only 'll. I do catch myself saying things like "Sh'we go?" "Washaweedoo?" - I guess I picked this up in childhood. The legal use of shal

Re: Pronunciation of “gill”  •  January 30, 2014, 6:25pm  •  0 vote

@HS perhaps you meant "the timely Stephen Fry" (as opposed to "late")

Re: “The plants were withered” Adjective or passive?  •  January 28, 2014, 5:55pm  •  0 vote

It's quite interesting how we balk at "a made mistake", but not at "an easily-made mistake". Which reminds me of finding a studente with an English grammar book entitled "Made Simple English" - I to

Re: “hone in” vs. “home in”  •  January 22, 2014, 7:54pm  •  0 vote

I seem (dimly) to recall teaching "less" vs "fewer", and disagreeing with the materials provided (Murphy/Hewings??). There are certainly bigger fish to fry when it comes to style, word-choice, and get

Re: Fora vs Forums  •  January 14, 2014, 10:23pm  •  0 vote

We do in fact take on board some non-English grammar when lifting 'foreign' phrases into English, like "al fresco", "literati" and so on.

Re: “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive  •  December 11, 2013, 1:53pm  •  0 vote

@WW I agree. If anyone asked what a determiner is, I'd just give them a list. BTW in Hungarian, possession is done with noun endings not separate words.

Re: “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive  •  December 10, 2013, 6:08pm  •  0 vote

@WW perhaps I just meant "like an adjective" or "works like an adjective". One should remember that in Mandarin some "adjectives" work like verbs ; a bit like brown in ; "brown bread", "the pies brow

Re: mines  •  December 9, 2013, 10:32pm  •  0 vote

nzherald.co.nz/entertainment/news/article.cfm?c_id=1501119&objectid=10883450

Re: “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive  •  December 9, 2013, 3:33pm  •  0 vote

From a sheer ESOL standpoint, the less terminology the better: 'my' is an adjective and needs a following noun. "Mine" doesn't need a following noun. KISS. A 'determiner' is someone who determines so

Re: “Based out of”: Why?  •  December 9, 2013, 3:23pm  •  0 vote

@WW Oh I'm not against "awesome"; just don't recall hearing it in UK on my last furlogh (although I was "gobsmacked" by "OTT" , which were new to me)

Re: “Based out of”: Why?  •  December 8, 2013, 1:00pm  •  0 vote

@WW "Awesome" is mainly a colonial or downunder word, or is it now widespread in UK?

Re: “It is I” vs. “It is me”  •  December 8, 2013, 12:50pm  •  0 vote

@WW I agree - and the whole scenario somewhat forced.

Re: “It is I” vs. “It is me”  •  December 6, 2013, 5:41pm  •  0 vote

"I think I know who stole the petty cash; it was Janice!" "Really? Which Janice? "John's secretary. It was only she who had time and opportunity to copy the key to the safe." "But it could have bee

Re: mines  •  December 5, 2013, 7:34pm  •  1 vote

"The possessive pronoun mine, which becomes mines in AAVE, is also used quite frequently through AAVE as in The videogame is mines or The computer is mines." grin.com/en/e-book/196234/african-ameri

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  December 4, 2013, 7:23pm  •  0 vote

I found a copy of "The Stories of English" by David Crystal in the library, and there is a wealth of info about OE therein

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  December 3, 2013, 7:41pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper "Remoteness" was put forward by I think Michael Lewis in the lexical approach. It was an attempt to bring together the two meanings of the "past simple" (eg went/sang/rode) - past time or unr

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  December 3, 2013, 7:21pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper ' When the even was come,' says St. Matthew, viii. 16 (in the KJV) In German the auxiliary verb that goes with the past participle for intransitive verbs of motion is "is/are/was/were" inste

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  December 3, 2013, 2:41pm  •  2 votes

And as a footnote: most European languages have similar systems for handling conditionals and unreal ideas - the English system is borrowed from French and German. However, Slav languages tend to make

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  December 3, 2013, 2:14pm  •  2 votes

@Jasper Just to make the term "six-pack" clearer: (you need to draw this in boxes) IF-CLAUSE MAIN-CLAUSE 1) REAL/PRES/FUT "

Re: Modal Remoteness & Tense  •  December 3, 2013, 2:02pm  •  2 votes

@Jasper 1) The idea that there are "first","second", and "third" conditionals is just a way of putting it all across to ESOL intermediate students. The "six-pack" (as each conditional has two parts

Re: Selfie  •  December 3, 2013, 1:33pm  •  0 vote

And already being explained to ESOL students, now that I learnt it myself yesterday.

Re: Correspondence  •  December 1, 2013, 5:03am  •  0 vote

channel5.com/shows/the-wright-stuff/clips/richard-madeley-and-panel-discuss-about-the-british-economy itbusinessedge.com/cm/blogs/enderle/the-five-things-you-arent-allowed-to-discuss-about-linux/?c

Re: Correspondence  •  November 30, 2013, 5:45pm  •  0 vote

You might like to try discussing about "discuss about"

Re: Correspondence  •  November 29, 2013, 5:34pm  •  0 vote

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/behavior The plural seems to be used more in a "behavioral" context. Words are often both countable and non-pluralizeable, with a slight change in meaning. When coun

Re: Correspondence  •  November 28, 2013, 7:22pm  •  0 vote

http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/correspondence

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 27, 2013, 10:22pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf "The threshold for Latinates ... for most Anglishers ... is when the Normans took over." That pretty much limits Anglish to folk who are very knowledgeable about word-roots then. Some less eso

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 23, 2013, 6:20pm  •  0 vote

@WW 'being "forced"' to learn English: perhaps better stated as having little alternative. In reality, to work effectively in English, one needs to think in English, and this can be quite invasive. I

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 23, 2013, 6:04pm  •  0 vote

"Trainings" dates back to at least 1811 in AmE, used in military. You can find it via Ngram "Informations" on DW is sometimes heard from newsreader, reporter or interviewee. "Accomodations" is wide

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 22, 2013, 6:14pm  •  0 vote

"And why shouldn't Standard English open up a bit, after all it isn't even the mother tongue of most British white children. It's a language we can all use in common, but is it so terrible if a few di

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 22, 2013, 1:47pm  •  0 vote

@WW It is not uncommon in Eastern Europe for multinationals to sweep in and require all management employees to learn English, or use English for all internal documentation, both for their own benefit

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 22, 2013, 1:19pm  •  0 vote

To be clear, I was simply trying to point out that for many people English is a second language, not their native tongue, and that in the future this may well impact on what is today regarded as "stan

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 21, 2013, 11:07pm  •  0 vote

@HS Frankly, a far, far bigger issue is that there are notable areas of England where English is no longer the number one language, and over three hundred primary schools where not one of the children

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 21, 2013, 7:31pm  •  0 vote

The mechanism is already there; it's called a spell-checker (checks grammar too). "Ok guys, listen up: there's nothing wrong with your own language, just it's NBG if you want to get ahead"... @W

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 19, 2013, 9:30pm  •  0 vote

en.wiktionary.org/wiki/conversate en.wikipedia.org/wiki/African_American_Vernacular_English Apparently "conversate" is a dialect word, normal in AAVE, which also has its own grammar. Converse?

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 18, 2013, 7:45pm  •  0 vote

@WW "I teach in large and small corporations" - in my day that meant waiting in the snow for the tram at 0630, first class in-company at 0730, another tram.. and so on till mid-evening. I wish we'd ha

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 17, 2013, 12:36pm  •  1 vote

"leverage" is AmE term for BrE "gearing", although I've not heard the latter in a long time now in this sense. in, say, renting out property, the higher the mortgage, the higher the gearing or leverag

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 16, 2013, 9:51pm  •  1 vote

@Brus I thought in this case your logic was very logical. The first hurdle in teaching English (to non-English-speakers) is to decide what is English - usually American or British, but in fact the d

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 15, 2013, 10:49pm  •  0 vote

Edit: "Ye focht fae Wallace, will ye nae fecht fae freedom?"

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 15, 2013, 8:02pm  •  1 vote

@Brus. Aye, mon. Dinnae fash yersel aboot OED an' Websters. There's nae need to dree one's weird here. Ye fought for Wallace, will ye nae fight for freedom now?

Re: Tell About  •  November 10, 2013, 12:41am  •  1 vote

"Tell" in the beginning meant to count as in "untold millions". "Tell" has also been used in the sense of "recount" for hundreds of years. In German the same word "zaehlen" = count, and "erzaehlen"

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 9, 2013, 1:13pm  •  1 vote

What is wrong with new words, new expressions? What is wrong with lifting a phrase from one arena and applying it to another? Are we so fumble-witted that we cannot take in new coinage - fumble-finger

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 6, 2013, 3:52pm  •  0 vote

@WW re Ngram: I agree KJV is there, so are 'arvo', 'whilom', 'highte' spkiking before 1600 so i guess Chaucer and Shakespeare are in there too. Ngram will not go back before 1500. Looking at "thole" v

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 5, 2013, 1:54pm  •  0 vote

Re common usage: this applies in particular to the google ngram viewer: just where does the bible fit in? Does it count just once? Does the KJV count at all? Yet surely one of the most widely read and

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 5, 2013, 1:44pm  •  0 vote

The other thing I am not sure about in speaking of common usage is this: looking at, say, Tolkien and his works which of course inhold many archaic words and usages) - the question is how do they aff

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 5, 2013, 1:22pm  •  0 vote

Re common usage as a criterion: in teaching English to speakers of other languages (ESOL) common usage is rightly the main criterion: one wishes to teach "normal" English. To some extent this means

Re: Plural form of anonymous  •  November 2, 2013, 1:33pm  •  0 vote

"Thus, the heroes of today are no longer individuals living but anonymous dead."

Re: Motives vs. Motivation  •  October 30, 2013, 8:41pm  •  0 vote

@WW No, but I've gotten used to AmE spellings since reading economics and accounting using Am textbooks and working for multinationals where "labor costs" was the norm. I can still get out "Wotcha guv

Re: Motives vs. Motivation  •  October 29, 2013, 9:09pm  •  0 vote

Curiously, according to the Google Ngram Viewer, the usage of "motive", "motives" has been steadily declining since 1800. In contrast, usage of "motivate", "motivates", and "motivated" has risen to

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