Hairy Scot

Joined: January 31, 2011

Number of comments posted: 457

Number of votes received: 182

Expat Scot now living in NZ. Home town was Greenock. Achieved SCE(H) levels in a number of subjects. Was employed by a multi-national company so spent a fair bit of time in other parts of Europe. Moved to South Africa in 1981 and then to NZ in 2007.

Questions Submitted

Alternate Prepositions?

Mentee?

“admits to”

Pronunciation of “gill”

“You have two choices”

Selfie

Horizontal Stripes?

in that regard

“deal to”

Preferred forms

intend on doing?

“in regards to”

“it caught on fire”

“Liquid water”?

“get in contact”

“As per ....”?

-age words

Perpendicular

Stood down

Signage

Recent Comments

Re: Nother  •  March 12, 2012, 9:15pm  •  0 vote

I would seriously doubt that anyone saying "That's a whole nother story" is even aware that they may be using the word correctly. They probably think they are providing some amusing emphasis along th

Re: Nother  •  March 12, 2012, 5:09pm  •  0 vote

@goofy I would think we should perhaps strive to communicate better than people did hundreds of even thousands of years ago.

Re: Nother  •  March 12, 2012, 5:08pm  •  0 vote

&goofy The language has been, and is being, subjected to a progressive dumbing down in the pursuit of what can perhaps be described as "user friendliness". Whether or not this a good thing is debata

Re: of a  •  March 12, 2012, 4:30pm  •  0 vote

Saying "canon of a ministry" is a long way from saying something like "how long of a wait was it". The former is perfectly good english. The latter is not, and is, I suspect, something of an American

Re: Nother  •  March 12, 2012, 4:23pm  •  2 votes

Unfortunately not all change results in improvement.

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  February 23, 2012, 4:41pm  •  0 vote

@Porsche You are easily confused, and obviously somewhat lacking in the humour department. But I will endeavour to clarify my question. Not all houses have rooms which combine a bath/shower wit

Re: “advocate for” or just “advocate”?  •  February 16, 2012, 5:43pm  •  4 votes

One can advocate something or one can be an advocate for something.

Re: Over exaggeration  •  February 14, 2012, 12:25pm  •  2 votes

@Anwulf I agree that the examples you quote are valid and I certainly would have no problem using "much", "more", or "not too" with exaggerated, but I would still draw the line at using either over o

Re: The Best Euphemism for Shithouse?  •  February 8, 2012, 3:46pm  •  0 vote

@Brus Are the blanks in your final sentence intentional or editorial? Would be interested to know what we've missed. :) Both lavatory and toilet, based on their derivations, are probably more in

Re: that vs. if and whether  •  February 4, 2012, 5:41pm  •  0 vote

@Banjo Thanks for the explanation. Just shows that one is never too old to learn. Do you have an example that covers words like schedule, mandatory, premier, buoy, route, debut etc? There are a lo

Re: that vs. if and whether  •  February 3, 2012, 5:48pm  •  0 vote

@Banjo At the risk of going off topic, how does the pronunciation of a double "c" differ from that of a single "c"?

Re: Pronunciation of “Nova Scotia”  •  January 30, 2012, 9:14am  •  0 vote

Much the same as Julia Guillard mispronouncing "negotiate", it's probably a deliberate aberration in the quest to be unique.

Re: that vs. if and whether  •  January 30, 2012, 9:04am  •  2 votes

95% certainly suggests common usage. However, as can be seen from the majority of posts in the forum, common usage is not always correct usage. I would agree that some of the examples quoted certain

Re: “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve”  •  January 11, 2012, 6:41pm  •  0 vote

Ignore last line of previous comment. Forgot to clear before posting. :)

Re: “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve”  •  January 11, 2012, 6:40pm  •  0 vote

@mrcaleb @JJMBallantyne To a degree you are both right and wrong. Although laziness, the eccentricities of the language, and societal demographics are all factors, my feeling is that it's more a

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  January 8, 2012, 8:13pm  •  1 vote

One possibility is cacography, which is deliberate misspelling for comic effect:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cacography

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 11, 2011, 1:41pm  •  0 vote

@Chris I don't know when or where you learned geometry, but when I did a line at right angles to another line was described just as that. As I said above, a wall can be perpendicular to the floor, b

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  December 10, 2011, 3:35pm  •  0 vote

@Hacovo I am aware of the correct form of the verb to use with collective nouns. The examples I gave are some that people, especially UK sports commentators, often get wrong.

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  December 10, 2011, 12:47pm  •  0 vote

@Hacovo To paraphrase George Bernard Shaw: United Kingdom and United States, two countries divided by a common language. :)

Re: “enamored with” and “enamored by”  •  December 8, 2011, 1:33pm  •  1 vote

@cathyem I agree 110% with all that you say.

Re: What’s the difference between “commission” and “committee”  •  December 3, 2011, 4:15pm  •  0 vote

A committee is a group of individuals who rarely reach consensus and when they do the result is a camel. A commission can be a number of things, one of which is a committee. Usually that type of comm

Re: Rules for -ise and -ize  •  December 3, 2011, 4:05pm  •  0 vote

Replacing the 's' with a 'z' came about as a result of Scrabble players being stuck with 10 point penalties at the end of games. The OED lists both analyse (noun and verb) and analyze (verb), and i

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 2, 2011, 10:24pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf Thanks for your support. On a latinate derivative! :) Loved your suggestion of "anent" as an alternative for "in regard to". Maybe there is a case for bringing back Olde Englische.

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 2, 2011, 1:23pm  •  0 vote

@Ing I do not dispute that "vertical" is more commonly used than "perpendicular". My gripe is what I see as erroneous use of "perpendicular" as typified by the example I quoted.

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 2, 2011, 12:38pm  •  0 vote

@njtt Certainly the out of context usage is bothersome. However, be it prescriptivism, pedantry, or whatever, my preference is to stick to the usage which is closest to the root of the word. In fac

Re: Perpendicular  •  December 2, 2011, 12:31pm  •  0 vote

@njtt From the OED online:- A. adj. 1. a. Situated or directed at right angles to the plane of the horizon; vertical. a1450 (1391) Chaucer Treat. Astrolabe ii. §23. 45 Thou must have a pl

Re: Computer mouses or computer mice?  •  December 1, 2011, 3:54pm  •  0 vote

How about "pointing devices"?

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 6:07pm  •  0 vote

You forgot the "old". :) Never heard "an" being used before horse or house although I have heard it used with "hotel" by those who believe the "h" in that word to be silent. Which then brings us to

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 4:53pm  •  0 vote

@Hacovo Yep, plumb would serve in some cases. However, being a pedantic old curmudgeon, I much prefer the original pure meaning of perpendicular. But I would not attempt to force anyone on a particu

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 2:10pm  •  0 vote

@Ing I agree with you on the everyday conversation. There are probably few occasions when one would use perpendicular. You wouldn't say "he has a perpendicular posture", and certainly saying "the wa

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 30, 2011, 12:37pm  •  2 votes

@Ing I do not dispute any of the definitions you provide. The OED and Chambers provide the same definitions. Geometric or engineering documents depict 3 dimensions on a 2 dimensional plane so there

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  November 29, 2011, 11:42pm  •  0 vote

Is a verb not controlled by its subject? She makes pancakes. They make pancakes. She is alone. They are not alone. Language rules are something that must be obeyed. Why should the use of one as pa

Re: Smileys and other emoticons within parentheses  •  November 29, 2011, 6:21pm  •  0 vote

I would be nice if all blog sites and fora (forums) allowed the use of graphic emoticons then there would be no punctuation issues. Maybe Dyske can give us some thoughts on whether or not we can have

Re: Perpendicular  •  November 29, 2011, 6:17pm  •  0 vote

Please forgive the typo "is at".

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 29, 2011, 3:11pm  •  0 vote

I still believe that the "got" is unnecessary since "I have" in itself denotes possession or the need to do something whether or not used with "got". And as I said back in May, I would also take issu

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  November 29, 2011, 2:55pm  •  0 vote

Like Warsaw Will I often have to think a bit about sentences like the example he quotes. If one uses a different verb does it make the decision any easier? "Language rules set in stone make(s) me sh

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 28, 2011, 3:14pm  •  0 vote

@joeydq I agree with you. The example you quote shows that some of the explanations given in justification of the use of "have got" are utter nonsense. Furthermore, why use 2 words when one will do

Re: “with the exception of” or “with the exceptions of”  •  November 27, 2011, 10:09am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will Ah the good old days! Lochgelly was home to the manufacturer of the fiendish instruments.

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 25, 2011, 4:09pm  •  0 vote

@New Reader Sigurd's original question actually invites discussion. Had the question been phrased in a manner which suggested that he/she was merely seeking information then perhaps you would have

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 25, 2011, 10:44am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will @New Reader Dunno if I would use burn in that context. I'd probably say "it pisses me off", or maybe even "it offpisses me".

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 25, 2011, 10:37am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I was not trying to be smart or nasty and I do appreciate the object of the forum. I just think it strange that someone asks for an opinion and then expresses doubt about the first ans

Re: “with the exception of” or “with the exceptions of”  •  November 24, 2011, 10:45pm  •  0 vote

Awrrabest!!

Re: “with the exception of” or “with the exceptions of”  •  November 24, 2011, 10:43pm  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will Nae problem! Just read yer profile an' had a squiz at yer blog. I am impressed, and will now consider my responses more carefully. Although I recognise that language evolves there

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 24, 2011, 1:26pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will As Hairy Scot pointed out in another post, doesn't it burn you when someone asks a question and then proceeds to gainsay your answer?

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 24, 2011, 1:24pm  •  0 vote

Should be "Caesar's murderers". Caesar did not murder anyone.

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 23, 2011, 4:19pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will My feeling is that there is a difference between "British English" and "English English", especially the variety spoken in South East England. As a Scot, I would love to be able to say

Re: Interchangeability of possessive “s” and “of”  •  November 23, 2011, 1:54pm  •  0 vote

@sigurd I see your point. Perhaps it's because some phrases just don't sound right. London's mayor means the same as the mayor of London, but people tend to use the latter form. Arc's Joan just do

Re: Backward vs. Backwards?  •  November 23, 2011, 1:43pm  •  1 vote

@steve3 The BBC also invariably uses "lawr". Regarding "in regard to" vs "in regards to", I think that is a can of worms best left for a separate discussion as I am sure the proponents of the "s

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  November 23, 2011, 1:19pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will My home town was Greenock. I left Scotland in 1981, but 35 years on Clydeside have left their mark. You're correct, I should put something in the profile section. Just a bit concerned

Re: “with the exception of” or “with the exceptions of”  •  November 22, 2011, 1:45pm  •  0 vote

I agree with Warsaw Will. :) "with the exception of" is correct and generally accepted.

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  November 21, 2011, 2:44pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf Since we use the term latinate to indicate latin roots, why do we say germanic and not germanate?

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  November 21, 2011, 2:20pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will As I said in another post, being a pedantic old curmudgeon, I try to follow what I believe are the correct rules, but I do not expect everyone to agree with me, although there are some t

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  November 20, 2011, 7:42pm  •  0 vote

Hi Anwulf, How's the novel? Glad we are once again on the same wavelength. " Different to" definitely grates on the ear, and I agree with your use of than followed by a clause. To say something

Re: “hone in” vs. “home in”  •  November 19, 2011, 12:00pm  •  0 vote

@Bob Sheidler I was actually referring to TV sports commentators. Have never seen this particular goof in print. Maybe depends on the newspapers one reads.

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  November 17, 2011, 12:44pm  •  0 vote

From http://www.straightdope.com :- "A sensible discussion of different from versus different than may be found in Theodore M. Bernstein's The Careful Writer, published in 1965. Bernstein favours the

Re: Texted  •  November 17, 2011, 11:42am  •  0 vote

@porsche "I would suggest that it's no different than saying" Tut tut! "Different from".

Re: Texted  •  November 17, 2011, 11:40am  •  1 vote

Text is a verb and its past participle is texted. The only problem is the way it is being used by the text speak brigade.

Re: No Woman No Cry  •  November 17, 2011, 11:34am  •  0 vote

WTFC!

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 16, 2011, 3:45pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I too am over 60, educated in Scotland during the 50s and early 60s, with "A" levels in a number of subjects and a degree in English. I try to abide by the rules of language that I was

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 16, 2011, 3:25pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I did not say that anyone had accused me of being pedantic. What I did say was that it puzzled me that anyone who advocates adherence to the rules of the language is vilified as a pedan

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 16, 2011, 3:17pm  •  0 vote

&Chris B I agree. Porsche's comments are normally worth reading, but I think he is a bit off the mark in this case.

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 16, 2011, 2:08pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will " different in British English, to that in American English" Tsk tsk "Different from laddie!!" .

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 16, 2011, 1:54pm  •  0 vote

@Porsche What utter balderdash!

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 16, 2011, 1:52pm  •  0 vote

I still think "I have a lovely bunch of coconuts" sounds so much better than "I've got a lovely bunch of coconuts"

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 16, 2011, 1:51pm  •  0 vote

@Porsche How about "I have to go" vs "I have got to go"? or "I have to have an operation" vs "I have got to have an operation"?

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 8:23pm  •  0 vote

Give us one example of a site or publication that states that the "was" in "If I was ........ I would" is a correct example of the subjunctive of the verb 'to be".

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 8:19pm  •  0 vote

@JJMBallantyne None so blind as he who will not see.

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 4:54pm  •  0 vote

Your name is well chosen.

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 2:28pm  •  0 vote

There seem to be lots of sites and sources which show "If I were........" as being correct. Have yet to find one that states that "If I was....." is in fact correct, although most do concede that it

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 1:35pm  •  0 vote

And another:- http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verbs-subjunctive.htm

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 1:34pm  •  0 vote

I am obviously better educated than the Red Goofy

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 1:33pm  •  0 vote

One more for the good guys:- http://iconlogic.blogs.com/weblog/2007/12/grammar-works-2.html

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 1:25pm  •  0 vote

I was taught English in the 1970s at the Berlitz School in Munich and the instructor always used "If I were......" not "If I was ..........". I have since met a lot of Europeans whose second language

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 12:59pm  •  0 vote

There are many sources that state that "If I were" is the correct form for the subjunctive of the verb "to be". What MWDEU lists as "standard" or "acceptable" is not necessarily "correct". Even Wik

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 12, 2011, 11:41am  •  0 vote

@JJMBallantyne We have already established what is correct. But despite all of the evidence you just refuse to acknowledge it. Maybe you can give us your educational history? Use of the correct fo

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 11, 2011, 9:47pm  •  1 vote

@Warsaw Will Like you I was expressing an opinion. Do you have evidence to back up yours? Anyone who was educated in a British senior secondary school would definitely disagree with you. Correct u

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 11, 2011, 4:38pm  •  0 vote

@Hairy LOL

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 11, 2011, 11:57am  •  0 vote

The most annoying thing about pedants is that they are usually correct. While common usage can be a good thing, the unfortunate fact is that in lots of cases it is not. @Warsaw Will I think your st

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 10, 2011, 3:46pm  •  0 vote

I took Latin in high school (don't ask me why, I have forgotten). My lasting memory is of one classics master with a sense of humour telling a bunch of second year students, "In Latin a sentence is a

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 9, 2011, 3:44pm  •  0 vote

@Porsche @JJM My apologies, you are absolutely correct. I should have said "which has an irregular subjunctive", and perhaps have added, "It is that very fact which causes the confusion that led t

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 8:19pm  •  0 vote

There are a number of discussion forums covering this topic, and the opinions are as varied as those given here. One example is at:- http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=50929 I was tau

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 4:58pm  •  0 vote

The statement "It may seem that was is crowding out subjunctive were" suggests that there is a difference between "was" and "subjunctive were". Where does MWDEU state what the subjunctive is, what it

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 4:38pm  •  0 vote

@goofy Yes, I agree. But you did say "how good writers actually write".

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 4:09pm  •  0 vote

@goofy "If I were....." formal, written "If I was ...." informal, conversational There is a good and detailed explanation here:- http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verbs-subjun...

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 3:42pm  •  0 vote

Why is being correct labelled as pedantry? English is my second language and I find it intriguing that people who insist on correctness are labelled, almost insultingly, as pedants. Why is this? Wh

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  November 8, 2011, 3:37pm  •  0 vote

I thought this one had been done to death. Advocating adherence to the rules and structures of a language is not pedantry. Have a look at this:- http://www.englishclub.com/grammar/verbs-subjunctive

Re: “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve”  •  November 8, 2011, 3:27pm  •  5 votes

@Jor Please don't get me started on the misuse of apostrophes. My brain might explode.

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 8, 2011, 11:32am  •  0 vote

Looks like some unregistered bozo has found a way to make use of registered names. Last time this happened a lot of posts were removed.

Re: “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve”  •  November 7, 2011, 9:26pm  •  2 votes

Never seen the "ov" form, but "would ov" is no more correct than "would of".

Re: “would of” instead of “would have” or “would’ve”  •  November 7, 2011, 9:20pm  •  0 vote

@AnWulf "The Coffin Dancer" by Jeffery Deaver. (Whose father, like Roald Dahl's, couldn't spell.) ;)

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 7, 2011, 3:23pm  •  1 vote

@AnWulf Surprised to see that you haven't climbed into the debate about "This is she".

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  November 7, 2011, 12:54pm  •  0 vote

Isn't it called an Americanism? :)

Re: “enamored with” and “enamored by”  •  November 7, 2011, 12:50pm  •  5 votes

Try searching for enamoured, you'll find lots of info: enamoured or (US) enamored adj 1 (usually enamoured with someone) formal or literary in love with them. 2 (usually enamoured of something) ve

Re: What can I do besides...  •  November 5, 2011, 1:44pm  •  1 vote

@dogreed Sorry dude, you got it wrong. Besides appears in both the OED and Chambers:- besides prep in addition to, as well as or apart from something or someone. adverb 1 also; as well • We saw t

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 7:51pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf As one whose native tongue was all but eliminated by the English (the race, not the language), I would agree that evolution does not always lead to improvement. What followed 1066 in England

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 6:28pm  •  0 vote

Since AS is your hobby I will bow to your superior knowledge. :)

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 5:38pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf Maybe you should join the Anglish community. As lots of posters keep saying on this forum, "Language evolves". The concern is whether or not the evolution is good or bad.

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 5:30pm  •  0 vote

Tung:- Old High German Etymology Cognate with Old English dung, Icelandic dyngja Noun tung a barn covered with dung an underground cellar

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 2:35pm  •  0 vote

Yes indeed, well said Valentina.

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  November 4, 2011, 2:27pm  •  0 vote

Thank you Valentina.

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