Hairy Scot

Joined: January 31, 2011

Number of comments posted: 457

Number of votes received: 181

Expat Scot now living in NZ. Home town was Greenock. Achieved SCE(H) levels in a number of subjects. Was employed by a multi-national company so spent a fair bit of time in other parts of Europe. Moved to South Africa in 1981 and then to NZ in 2007.

Questions Submitted

Alternate Prepositions?

Mentee?

“admits to”

Pronunciation of “gill”

“You have two choices”

Selfie

Horizontal Stripes?

in that regard

“deal to”

Preferred forms

intend on doing?

“in regards to”

“it caught on fire”

“Liquid water”?

“get in contact”

“As per ....”?

-age words

Perpendicular

Stood down

Signage

Recent Comments

Re: hanged vs. hung  •  December 29, 2012, 10:30pm  •  0 vote

I fall in with the "objects are hung", "people are hanged" lobby. There is, however, one notable instance when hung can be used in referring to a person. I'm sure we all know what that one is. :-))

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  December 29, 2012, 6:53pm  •  0 vote

There are a couple of interesting graphs here :- http://stancarey.wordpress.com/2011/04/20/different-from-different-than-different-to/ Make of them what you will. :-))

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  December 29, 2012, 5:50pm  •  0 vote

As the originator of the original thread, an educated Scot, and, to be honest, something of a purist I still cringe at the use of "different to". While there may be a case for "different than" in avo

Re: who vs. whom  •  December 23, 2012, 2:19am  •  0 vote

@W Will Thanks for the references. I'll try to have a look at them. I think I have mentioned in the past my respect for your credentials in your field, and I must emphasise that my comments are no

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  December 23, 2012, 2:07am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will At least we agree on some things. :-)) I too am of the old school (surprise surprise) wrt the pronunciation of the names you mention. Menzies, Dalziel, and Milngavie are old favourites

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  December 22, 2012, 11:37pm  •  1 vote

@porsche Yes, I can relate to the chants from the crowd or the players. Just sounds strange coming from the commentators. My bridge partner and I have been known to quietly chant "dee fence dee f

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  December 22, 2012, 9:45pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will Another mystery which is perhaps only of interest to Scots is the pronunciation of names like McKay and Menzies (although the latter is probably excusable). I would also dearly love to

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  December 22, 2012, 9:34pm  •  0 vote

@JimJ123 Have a look here :- http://painintheenglish.com/case/4913

Re: who vs. whom  •  December 22, 2012, 6:29pm  •  0 vote

@porsche Sorry about that. I do take your point, but I may have forgotten to take my tolerance pill today. :-)) As a purist, and possibly a pedant, my earlier AARRGGGHH!!!! was intended as self d

Re: who vs. whom  •  December 22, 2012, 3:22pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will As a matter of fact I do try to keep to what I believe is correct. If that amuses some then so be it. I would never presume to correct anyone with whom I was having a conversation e

Re: who vs. whom  •  December 21, 2012, 8:23pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will Perhaps you could consider the reverse of your question? Your mantra "formalism of outdated artificial rules which have little basis in reality" is oft quoted by those too lazy or ignor

Re: Resume, resumé, or résumé?  •  December 15, 2012, 10:00pm  •  0 vote

In my book a résumé is a shortened CV, and resume is a verb.

Re: who vs. whom  •  December 15, 2012, 9:55pm  •  0 vote

As a purist I can only say AARRGGGHH!!!!

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  December 15, 2012, 9:54pm  •  1 vote

Would anyone care to explain the (apparently American) preference for the "aye" sound in Adolf, arab, and gala and the use of the "eye" sound in semi, anti, simultaneous?

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  November 2, 2012, 8:40pm  •  0 vote

Another example of the "think it's classy/clever" genre is:- assembly -- assemblage

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  November 1, 2012, 2:39pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I have no issue with signage when it is used correctly. My gripe is with those who use it as an alternative plural of sign because they feel it sounds clever.

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 28, 2012, 12:54am  •  0 vote

LOL Like me you have a dyslexic koybeard. I have some more for your list. inform -- apprise eventuate -- happen

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  October 27, 2012, 2:10pm  •  0 vote

Skeeter, I think "There are those who think it is classy" sums it up beautifully. I would have "Signs >> Signage" at the top of my list.

Re: American versus British question  •  October 23, 2012, 10:29am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I must confess that I am not the author of the "email", and I do make use of both irony and self-deprecation as and when appropriate. It should of course be remembered that while WE

Re: American versus British question  •  October 22, 2012, 2:33am  •  0 vote

:-))

Re: American versus British question  •  October 22, 2012, 2:33am  •  0 vote

To the citizens of the United States of America from Her Sovereign Majesty Queen Elizabeth II: In light of your immediate failure to financially manage yourselves and also in recent years your t

Re: You’ve got another think/thing coming  •  October 17, 2012, 8:55pm  •  3 votes

@Warsaw Will This is an excellent example of the type of evolution of language that we could well do without and about which I have constantly ranted. It;s right up there with "home in" becoming "ho

Re: “Liquid water”?  •  October 15, 2012, 1:56pm  •  0 vote

That should be "as being odd"

Re: “Liquid water”?  •  October 15, 2012, 1:56pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will Article was indeed related to cosmology, and while I do take your point on the topic, something about the phrase does strike me being odd. But then maybe that's just me. :-))

Re: “He gave it to Michelle and I”  •  October 15, 2012, 1:50pm  •  0 vote

A few years ago while listening to Classic FM in the UK a chap, who sounded well educated, 'phoned in a request which he said was in celebration of "my wife and I's birthday". A little learning and a

Re: “Liquid water”?  •  October 12, 2012, 5:11pm  •  0 vote

Have seen it used in a number of reports, latest of which was an article in The Independent. IMHO to the man in the street the terms ice, water, steam, all refer to H20 in its various forms and that

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 10, 2012, 2:38am  •  0 vote

Hi Warsaw Will, It was Eugene who mentioned the blurring. As I said, I do not dispute any of what you say. Language is a living thing and of course changes will occur. It is perhaps unfortunate that

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 8, 2012, 3:54pm  •  0 vote

To get back to my original question:- Why and how did this "blurring of meaning" originate?

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 8, 2012, 3:46pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will All of what you say is of course true. However there is, IMHO, a difference between "blurring of meaning" and reversal of meaning. If there were no rules there would be chaos, but si

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 7, 2012, 2:05pm  •  1 vote

@Eugene Ryder @Warsaw Will I was being neither condescending nor nationalistic, merely making a point. The first few sentences of my post are not my own words but are in fact quoted from:- http:

Re: “get in contact”  •  September 25, 2012, 2:45pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will I quite agree with your point on pet peeves. As I said in an earlier post, they are often totally illogical and may even appear silly to others. Since they are not designed to demons

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 25, 2012, 7:54pm  •  0 vote

@goofy I have crossed swords with DAW on another topic so I will chose my words carefully. Like me, and everyone else, he has his standards and opinions on various aspects of the language. I admi

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 25, 2012, 6:00pm  •  0 vote

@goofy I'm sorry, but I seem to have missed the part where an appeal was made to another language. The English language has been influenced by many other languages but I do not believe that any

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 25, 2012, 5:40pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf Glad to see you're back on form. Interesting that although some of the American spellings may come from very early English some of the pronunciations do not follow suit. You state "e before

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 24, 2012, 2:50am  •  0 vote

With Collins inviting the public to submit entries for its latest dictionary last week, new words – or neologisms – are a hot topic at the moment. This year has been a particularly fertile one for the

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 24, 2012, 2:47am  •  1 vote

Oxford Dictionary to cease after adding ‘amazeballs’ February 24, 2012 258 3 319 Word News: The Oxford English Dictionary has announced plans to add the word ‘amazeballs’ to its latest edition and

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 19, 2012, 12:12am  •  0 vote

@AnWulf Completely off topic, and nothing to do with language. I see from your profile that you were in the US armed forces and I am curious about the way in which certain behaviours of military per

Re: “get in contact”  •  July 12, 2012, 10:43pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf As I said, personal preferences and opinions. What you find acceptable may cause me to grind my teeth and vice versa. That should not prevent either of us from expressing those preferen

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 12, 2012, 7:25pm  •  1 vote

@D.A.Wood Please take a look at the thread on acronyms. :-))

Re: “get in contact”  •  July 12, 2012, 7:23pm  •  0 vote

I agree that no justification should be necessary. All too often you find something sets your teeth on edge for no apparent reason. Pet peeves can at times seem totally illogical to other people, al

Re: Pronouncing “mandatory”  •  July 12, 2012, 3:29pm  •  0 vote

@D. A. Wood @Mediator 100% agreement. You have both hit the nail on the head.

Re: “get in contact”  •  July 12, 2012, 2:25pm  •  2 votes

Personal preference mainly, they just don't sound right, kind of stilted and pretentious, almost a bastardisation of the verb 'contact'. Prefer 'contact' or 'get in touch' and 'maintain contact' or '

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 12, 2012, 9:32am  •  0 vote

The OED on my desktop has: /ˈɡaːlə/ /ˈɡeɪlə/ Etymology: < French gala, < Italian gala. But as I said in another post, I can never figure out these glyphics. Gay-la, like Ae-dolf, Ae-rab, Aetriu

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 12, 2012, 1:07am  •  0 vote

Al, You could well be correct.

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 11, 2012, 11:33pm  •  0 vote

I would like to express my regrets and offer my apologies to the other contributors on this thread for the rather over the top comments in some of my posts. I'm afraid I let D.A.Wood get under my sk

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 11, 2012, 9:33pm  •  0 vote

Dear DAW, In my 60+ years on this planet I have learned quite a bit about a wide range of subjects. I will not bore you with a complete list, but history is on that list, especially the history arou

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 11, 2012, 8:39pm  •  1 vote

Probably the same with data. But what about baba, java, gaga, haka, lama, lava, mama, mana, nada, nana, papa, saga, etc etc. 'Twould seem that gayla and dayta may be out of line.

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 11, 2012, 8:32pm  •  1 vote

Never could decipher those hieroglyphics that are used to indicate pronunciations. This link illustrates that (according to them) the American and UK pronunciations differ. (Now there's a surprise

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 11, 2012, 7:13pm  •  0 vote

@D.A.Wood Have you ever ventured outside of America?

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 11, 2012, 7:03pm  •  0 vote

@D.A.Wood Not sure where you get the idea that my vocabulary is not so large. I am sure that my vocabulary far exceeds yours, as does my IQ, general knowledge, knowledge of English and its grammar,

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 11, 2012, 5:40pm  •  0 vote

You must have seen the same newscast as I did last night!!

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 11, 2012, 5:38pm  •  0 vote

It is really amazing that D.A.W. manages to use so many words. Is DAW perhaps an acronym for Definitely All Waffle?

Re: Molotov Cocktails  •  July 10, 2012, 10:34pm  •  6 votes

Nobody in America knows what a petrol bomb is? That is really sad. I am sure if you mentioned a gasoline bomb in the UK, South Africa, Australia, or New Zealand, that everyone would know exactly wha

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 9, 2012, 5:44pm  •  0 vote

@goofy @D.A.W. I did not complain about Webster's dictionaries or MWDEU, I merely pointed out that not everyone considers those publications to be a definitive source on matters relating to the Eng

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  July 6, 2012, 6:42pm  •  0 vote

@DAW Yes I am aware of the construction, just too lazy to type it. Taking a leaf out of our American cousins' book and eschewing double vowels where possible. ;-))

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 6, 2012, 4:49pm  •  0 vote

@Brus How about "To turn a fox into a dog your marry it/her"?

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  July 6, 2012, 4:47pm  •  0 vote

@DAW My favourite German tongue twister is "Zugang zu den zugen". Also love the way German comes up with wonderful compound words like "mietwaggenruckgabe". My apologies for the lack of the appro

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  July 4, 2012, 6:44pm  •  1 vote

Collins, Chambers, and OED seem to be unanimous:- Pled verb (Scots law, US) a past tense and past participle of plead As a Scot who was once in an occupation having daily dealings with Scottish

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 27, 2012, 10:11pm  •  0 vote

I'll concede that Noah is not responsible for "skeptic". As for sources I prefer the the OED, which many consider definitive. It has this to say about sceptic/skeptic :- Etymology: < French scepti

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 27, 2012, 8:16pm  •  1 vote

Spell checker was using default setting of ENG-US. Problem disappeared when I changed to ENG-GB.

Re: Repeated  •  June 27, 2012, 7:28pm  •  1 vote

Some might say idiotic. :-))

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 27, 2012, 5:28pm  •  1 vote

I suspect that any publication on the English Language that contains the name Webster is likely to be viewed with some scepticism in certain quarters. This may be because of the influence of such pub

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 27, 2012, 5:11pm  •  2 votes

I too prefer to maintain a diplomatic silence on that subject. Rather than Morocco-bound I may be hidebound.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 25, 2012, 10:20pm  •  0 vote

As goofy says the use of "they" and its derivatives as a common gender singular pronoun has been around for quite some time. This is in fact documented in a number of sources. It would be nice to se

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 24, 2012, 3:13am  •  1 vote

@Brus I left God's country in 1981 and there are still some things that I miss. One has to be aware that in Glasgow and the south-west some phrases should not be interpreted literally. For exampl

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 23, 2012, 6:52pm  •  0 vote

@Brus Beware!! Last time I referred to something as an Americanism on this site JJMBallantyne accused me of petty snobbery. :-) BTW: Pled is quite widely used in Scotland.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 23, 2012, 4:17pm  •  1 vote

Interesting entry :- http://grammarist.com/usage/pleaded-pled/

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 23, 2012, 3:24pm  •  1 vote

I tend to use both "pled" and "pleaded" depending on the context. "The accused pled not guilty." "He pleaded with his sister not to tell mother." I also prefer "sneaked" and "dived" to "snuck" an

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  June 23, 2012, 3:13pm  •  0 vote

@AnWulf Does a "pet peeve" have to be valid, and who determines its validity? In common with many others, I have a fair number of what might be termed "pet peeves", some of which I will admit are a

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 22, 2012, 9:03pm  •  0 vote

OOPS!! Should have typed "I am so glad that none of DAW's posts on this thread is on paper." We all make mistakes. :-)

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  June 22, 2012, 8:59pm  •  0 vote

I am so glad that none of DAW's posts on this thread are on paper. Think of the trees he'd have wasted! I am also in awe of his typing stamina. Or was some use made of copy and paste?

Re: “We will have ... tomorrow” or “We have ... tomorrow”  •  June 22, 2012, 5:00pm  •  8 votes

I wouldn't say that one is any more or less correct than the other. A lot would depend on the context:- "Don't drink too much tonight guys, remember that we have a cricket tournament tomorrow."

Re: “Me neither.” or “Me either”  •  June 21, 2012, 8:11pm  •  0 vote

In the context of:- "Speaker A: I don’t like going to the beach when it is cold outside. Speaker B: Me neither (or Me either)" I think that "nor" is preferable to "neither" or "either". Whether it

Re: Nother  •  June 10, 2012, 1:10am  •  0 vote

@cgtay33 "Nother" is already a real word and has been in use since the 11th. or 12th. century. It also meets what many consider the ultimate approval in that it appears in the OED.

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  June 5, 2012, 3:24am  •  0 vote

@vf My memory of the English taught in the Scottish schools which I attended from 1951 until 1963 is reasonably intact and one of the rules that we were taught was that "different from" was the co

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  June 4, 2012, 2:27pm  •  0 vote

Dear vf, Aye, very good. We'll just have to agree to disagree. Not sure that anyone was claiming superiority. Just one small point in closing: one would think that since in normal use the

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  June 3, 2012, 9:26pm  •  0 vote

@John C You are of course entitled to hold to your stance, as I am to mine. Once upon a time I would have argued this point till blue in the face (another old Scots custom not understood by the En

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  June 3, 2012, 4:50pm  •  0 vote

@John C Please do not confuse Britain with England. There are major differences in the way the language is used in the various countries, and indeed counties, in the British Isles. "Different to

Re: Correct preposition following different?  •  June 3, 2012, 3:43pm  •  0 vote

Good to see that this old thread is still alive. @vf Tom Cross is correct and you are wrong. I am from Britain and I would never dream of saying "different to" or "different than". There are tho

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  June 3, 2012, 1:52am  •  2 votes

I think you'll find that in English those words that end in "nym" refer to words rather than initials. Homonym, antonym, synonym etc. The English language has a number of areas where differences in

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  June 3, 2012, 1:25am  •  2 votes

From Chambers:- acronym noun a word made from the first letters or syllables of other words, and usually pronounced as a word in its own right, eg NATO. Compare abbreviation, contraction, initialism.

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  June 3, 2012, 12:45am  •  2 votes

I think I covered that in my initial post. I believe that an acronym has to be a pronouncable word. Thus, RADAR, LASER, NATO, RADA, NASA, are all acronyms and FBI, IBM, NSA, ATM, are not (except per

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  June 2, 2012, 5:15pm  •  2 votes

@DAPster I agree that all acronyms consist of initials, but not all sets of initials are acronyms. As for mnemonics: anything can be used as a mnemonic, initials, acronyms, words, phrases, number or

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  June 1, 2012, 6:19pm  •  0 vote

Ve haf vays ov making u tok!

Re: Difference between acronyms and initials?  •  May 25, 2012, 7:31pm  •  1 vote

@nblor I think what you mean are mnemonics.

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  May 14, 2012, 4:13pm  •  0 vote

@AnWulf There is an interesting and amusing entry in the Urban Dictionary http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=conversate which contains some amusing points, but does identify the source

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  May 13, 2012, 9:35pm  •  3 votes

Conversate does not appear in the OED, or Chambers, or Collins. Does not even appear in Wordweb. That would suggest it ain't a word!

Re: “hack” in “hackathon”  •  May 4, 2012, 5:01pm  •  0 vote

The OED shows a usage of "hack" from 1745 as :- To make a hack of, to put to indiscriminate or promiscuous use; to make common, vulgar, or stale, by such treatment; Not sure when it was first used

Re: It had impacts on...  •  April 27, 2012, 3:03pm  •  0 vote

For once I agree with JJMB. :-) I would also avoid the use of impacted, but that's just my choice. What's wrong with using "affect/affects/affected"?

Re: Pronunciation of “Nova Scotia”  •  March 16, 2012, 5:22pm  •  0 vote

@Brus I agree. It is No-va Scoh-shia. Certainly not Scoh-thia nor Sco-shuh. But probably Professor Ballantyne will assert that that is petty snobbery.

Re: of a  •  March 15, 2012, 8:10am  •  0 vote

@JJMB I should add that humour is also sadly absent from your ravings.

Re: of a  •  March 15, 2012, 8:08am  •  0 vote

@JJMB I have been reviewing some of your other pronouncements in this forum and have come to the conclusion that you are even more pedantic and prescriptive than I and many others. In addition, yo

Re: “Fine” as a complete sentence  •  March 14, 2012, 5:44pm  •  1 vote

Maybe a bit off topic but it does illustrate the dangers of having the balls or guts to continue an argument after the utterance of "Fine!" :- To those of you who are nit-pickers about the meaning of

Re: of a  •  March 14, 2012, 3:56pm  •  0 vote

Pity we don't have a facility to include images in posts. Maybe Dyske can help with that. 8-;)

Re: of a  •  March 14, 2012, 3:54pm  •  0 vote

'Twould seem the emoticon I seek is 8-;) Found it after a bit of a search.

Re: “Fine” as a complete sentence  •  March 14, 2012, 3:48pm  •  0 vote

The one word sentence "Fine." when uttered by your wife or partner is a very clear danger signal often followed by hospitalisation due to concussive injury..

Re: of a  •  March 14, 2012, 1:31pm  •  0 vote

@Brus I expected someone to bite and come back with a lucid argument to counter my assertion about the americanism. The snobbery jibe was a bit of a surprise. @JJMB I have oft admitted that I am

Re: Nother  •  March 14, 2012, 1:23pm  •  0 vote

@Anwulf I omitted the smiley in my last post, and you will note that I said "One could argue". :-) As for butchery, I would agree that the English themselves (especially the politicians and media

Re: -age words  •  March 14, 2012, 1:16pm  •  0 vote

I am aware that we have had -age words for quite some time, but most of those came into being in a completed state (if that is the correct term). They were not formed by tagging -age onto the end of a

Re: of a  •  March 14, 2012, 8:04am  •  0 vote

"Petty snobbery"! ROFLMAO

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