Hairy Scot

Joined: January 31, 2011

Number of comments posted: 465

Number of votes received: 205

Expat Scot now living in NZ. Home town was Greenock. Achieved SCE(H) levels in a number of subjects. Was employed by a multi-national company so spent a fair bit of time in other parts of Europe. Moved to South Africa in 1981 and then to NZ in 2007.

Questions Submitted

3 Laning?

“Watching on”?

Alternate Prepositions?

Mentee?

“admits to”

Pronunciation of “gill”

“You have two choices”

Selfie

Horizontal Stripes?

in that regard

“deal to”

Preferred forms

intend on doing?

“in regards to”

“it caught on fire”

“Liquid water”?

“get in contact”

“As per ....”?

-age words

Perpendicular

Stood down

Signage

Recent Comments

Re: “How is everything tasting?”  •  March 12, 2014, 6:43pm  •  2 votes

@Erroll I'm with you. "How's everything?" or "Everything OK" do seem to be more appropriate than "How's everything tasting?". @Gustav Same problem exists in German.

Re: “admits to”  •  March 12, 2014, 2:24pm  •  0 vote

@Skeeter Lewis I'd say "he confessed to committing the offence" and even "he admitted committing the offence" both sound more natural than "he admitted to committing the offence". But perhaps it's

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 12, 2014, 10:46am  •  0 vote

@Jasper Au contraire, I am willing to change my mind if convinced. I'm just hard to convince. :-)) Plus I do like to play devil's advocate now and then. As for "do the math"; should it n

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 12, 2014, 4:23am  •  0 vote

Please ignore the last line of my previous post. Some garbage that I forgot to delete.

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 12, 2014, 4:21am  •  0 vote

@WW Just to clarify the situation regarding PP. He was an elderly neighbour whose views were similar to my own (in effect "another grumpy old fart") who accessed the internet from his laptop via my

Re: “admits to”  •  March 11, 2014, 10:33pm  •  0 vote

@Jayles PP was an atheist, so I don't think he'd be too worried about Saint Peter.

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 11, 2014, 8:49pm  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will March 11, 2014, 7:37pm @Hairy Scot - "just another damned Americanism sent to plague us" - yeah, right! Oh de

Re: “admits to”  •  March 11, 2014, 8:27pm  •  0 vote

"Confess/confessed to" I can understand but unfortunately I can't quite swallow "admit/admitted to". Perfect Pedant was in fact an acquaintance of mine. He unfortunately passed on last year.

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 11, 2014, 4:58pm  •  0 vote

edit: The fact that someone's granny used a phrase for decades does not render that phrase correct or logical and no amount of anecdotal evidence will convince me of that. Apologies for the typ

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 11, 2014, 4:57pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper Perhaps intransigent is a bit strong, but I do remain unconvinced. To me the phrase "you have two choices" makes no sense. It's in the same class as "do the math", "you have another thing c

Re: You’ve got another think/thing coming  •  March 11, 2014, 4:13pm  •  0 vote

:-)

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  March 11, 2014, 12:13pm  •  0 vote

:-))

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  March 11, 2014, 12:10pm  •  0 vote

@K¥£!€ I believe cacography has already been mentioned.

Re: What does “Curb your dog” mean?  •  March 11, 2014, 4:54am  •  0 vote

1. The edge of the sidewalk is a kerb. Not sure how or when curb came to be used in this context. Maybe another Americanism. 2. Curb as a verb means to control or restrain. 3. Curb as a no

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 11, 2014, 3:22am  •  0 vote

@Jasper Your example "you can have a sofa made to order in a choice of over forty fabrics" says it all. "a choice" not "forty choices" regardless of the number of options there is always "a choice"

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 11, 2014, 1:48am  •  0 vote

I must reiterate my initial point:- Option and choice are not synonymous. If there is more than one option then there is a choice, therefore "you have a choice", or "you have options" (even "you hav

Re: Pronunciation of “gill”  •  January 30, 2014, 10:39pm  •  0 vote

@jayles Skeeter got close. To be honest, I was probably being a little too cryptic and perhaps trying to be a little too clever. :-))

Re: Pronunciation of “gill”  •  January 30, 2014, 1:39pm  •  0 vote

@SL It would seem that my (attempted) humour has missed the mark.

Re: Pronunciation of “gill”  •  January 28, 2014, 3:02pm  •  0 vote

@WW I should have perhaps put erstwhile in italics or quotes. I'd love to know which word you think is missing. :-)) If it's too sensitive for PITE perhaps you can let

Re: “hone in” vs. “home in”  •  January 21, 2014, 4:17pm  •  0 vote

@WW Let's not get personal. As you know by now I do on occasion like to be a bit naughty, or even provocative. :-)) Unfortunately with printed text it is often

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  January 19, 2014, 5:39pm  •  0 vote

@WW Thanks for the links. I will certainly have a look there. CRAFT is one of my favourite true acronyms. (Subtle hint there. :) ) It is especially appropriate for those of my vintage. It m

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  January 19, 2014, 3:15pm  •  0 vote

@WW I may well be confused regarding the source of the info about the 60s surge. It was in the form of a graph which I was sure appeared on a site to which you had posted a link. However I cannot f

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  January 19, 2014, 2:32pm  •  0 vote

An original from 1603? Does Google have the originals? I did not say it was a recent phenomenon, I said it was little used until the 60s upsurge. Incidentally, that information was gleaned fr

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  January 19, 2014, 11:09am  •  0 vote

I will agree that there are occasions when "different than" could be used to avoid some awkward constructs, but the example I quoted certainly does not fit in that category. As for claims of past usa

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  January 18, 2014, 9:37pm  •  1 vote

This article http://business.time.com/2014/01/18/amazon-wants-to-send-you-stuff-before-youve-even-decided-to-buy-it/?xid=rss-topstories in Time Magazine contains the following beauty:- "That is a d

Re: and so...  •  January 11, 2014, 10:30pm  •  1 vote

George Bush is an old so and so. :-))

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  January 11, 2014, 10:27pm  •  0 vote

http://www.englishclub.com/vocabulary/cw-bring-take.htm

Re: You’ve got another think/thing coming  •  January 6, 2014, 4:18am  •  0 vote

@_Shorty I think you have completely missed the point. "You've got another thing coming." is meaningless. The correct use of the phrase in question was, is, and always will be "If you think .......

Re: Prepositions at the end of a clause  •  December 13, 2013, 12:05am  •  0 vote

On his 70th birthday, a man was given a gift certificate from his wife. The certificate was for a consultation with an Indian medicine man living on a nearby reservation who was rumored to have a si

Re: Selfie  •  December 3, 2013, 8:36pm  •  0 vote

ROFLMAO

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 21, 2013, 11:47pm  •  0 vote

@jayles I do not believe that we can blame immigrants in the UK, or their descendants, for the aberrations and abominations which now pollute our language. Although errors may be more common among t

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 21, 2013, 9:14pm  •  0 vote

@WW If you are happy with rubbish like "conversate", "would of". "hone in on", etc creeping into the language then so be it. I, for one, fail to see how such things can in any way improve communic

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 20, 2013, 10:19pm  •  0 vote

@WW In all seriousness, I have no wish to stifle the evolution of our language nor do I wish to eliminate its various nuances and grey areas. However I firmly believe that some mechanism is needed t

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 20, 2013, 5:39pm  •  0 vote

@WW "thank God we don't have such an equivalent, and that every time the idea has been suggested, from John Dryden onwards, wiser heads have prevailed" And the result is chaos, the linguistic equiva

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  November 19, 2013, 8:46pm  •  0 vote

@Carrie13 @fussbudgit Welcome to the club. If English had the equivalent of the Académie Française then blights like "conversate", "would of", and many others would not have crept into existence

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 17, 2013, 2:45pm  •  0 vote

@WW wrt leverage; I think its use as a verb has, like a lot of "business speak", come from AmE as does the mispronunciation that normally accompanies it.

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 17, 2013, 12:05am  •  0 vote

@WW "@HS - would you object to 'case' (noun 14th century) being used as a verb ("enclose in a case," 1570s)? If we can make a compound noun, why not a compound verb? The only difference I can see is

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 16, 2013, 11:59pm  •  1 vote

An interesting site:- http://atrixnet.com/bs-generator.html

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 15, 2013, 4:05pm  •  0 vote

Another that hurts my ears is "showcase" when used as a verb. According to OED it first appeared in that form in 1945. 1945 H. L. Mencken Amer. Lang. Suppl. I. v. 387 A few of its [sc. Variety's

Re: Plural last name ending in “z”  •  November 15, 2013, 3:58pm  •  1 vote

@Larkin Goodriches would be the correct plural.

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  November 15, 2013, 3:53pm  •  0 vote

@WW I have heard "redd" on many occasions, mainly as "redd oot" meaning to clean out or clear out. It was/is often used by indignant mothers when discussing teenage son's untidy sleeping quarters.

Re: “feedback” and “check in”  •  November 4, 2013, 8:50pm  •  0 vote

I must say that I agree with Brus on the "feedback", "check in", and management speak issues. There are a few other examples that fall under the same umbrella:- "We'll 'update' you regularly." "mee

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  October 25, 2013, 9:31pm  •  0 vote

@WW You make a telling point about phrases from local dialect. There is a phrase commonly used in south west and central Scotland which I am sure would be very confusing to anyone from outside that

Re: Backward vs. Backwards?  •  October 18, 2013, 6:02pm  •  0 vote

Add to that:- nuc-u-lear instead of nu-clear Bir-naard instead of Bernard pri-meer instead of pre-m-i-er

Re: in that regard  •  October 17, 2013, 4:12pm  •  0 vote

@WW Being a stylish chap I prefer "regarding" or "as for". ;-)

Re: in that regard  •  October 16, 2013, 1:10pm  •  0 vote

@WW Anent misuse of regards; hearing things like:- "I must say that regards/as regards the common use of outwith instead of outside in Scotland I have no comment." really does make me cringe.

Re: in that regard  •  October 15, 2013, 3:27pm  •  0 vote

@WW Correction. As to "In that respect/regard" I must admit to favouring the former but cannot formulate any logical argument as to why.

Re: Plural forms of words borrowed from Latin  •  October 15, 2013, 2:05pm  •  0 vote

@WW Ach well, not often I'm right but ............................... :-)

Re: Plural forms of words borrowed from Latin  •  October 14, 2013, 9:37pm  •  0 vote

@Brus I must admit to having thoughts about shagging and other activities while sitting in a semi-comatose state while our Latin master droned on about conjugations and long vowels. That I never rai

Re: in that regard  •  October 14, 2013, 11:15am  •  0 vote

@WW Anent is OE, but I suppose its use may have continued longer in Scotland than in other parts of the (soon to be defunct?) UK.

Re: Plural forms of words borrowed from Latin  •  October 14, 2013, 11:10am  •  0 vote

@WW LOL, yes, I slipped in alias as a tease. Although I have often heard it pronounced with the "ah" sound I do agree that the "ae" sounds better. But who knows? I was the more concerned with the li

Re: Plural forms of words borrowed from Latin  •  October 14, 2013, 1:54am  •  0 vote

I have no real issue with how we pluralise words borrowed from Latin, but it does strike me as strange that we freely accept data but eschew fora and some others. My biggest gripe with the use of wor

Re: in that regard  •  October 14, 2013, 1:32am  •  0 vote

@WW An afterthought:- Instead of "Re ......"/"Regarding....." how about "Anent ............." As to "In that respect/regard" I must admit to favouring the latter but cannot formulate any logical a

Re: in that regard  •  October 14, 2013, 1:29am  •  0 vote

@WW Wow! I certainly got your attention. :-)

Re: Five eggs is too many  •  October 8, 2013, 2:18am  •  0 vote

@WW Was in The Auld Country for a month and stayed away from PCs and other electronic gizmos. :) As for my comment; just my cynicism creeping through.

Re: Five eggs is too many  •  October 7, 2013, 1:10am  •  1 vote

@Maigida I agree that English is a living language, however one should never underestimate the power of stupid people.

Re: “There can be only one” or “there can only be one”?  •  July 21, 2013, 5:57pm  •  1 vote

Or maybe, like Google, I am skewed by The Highlander.

Re: “There can be only one” or “there can only be one”?  •  July 21, 2013, 5:56pm  •  0 vote

Dunno why, but I lean toward "there can be only one". Perhaps because it does seem to have a slight difference in emphasis.

Re: have gone to  •  July 15, 2013, 5:30pm  •  0 vote

@WW As you have probably gathered from previous discussions I do tend to favour the more formal alternatives. Probably due to my being a pedantic old fart or perhaps a result of a series of overbe

Re: have gone to  •  July 10, 2013, 12:17am  •  0 vote

Regarding the OP: Why not just use "attended"?

Re: When is a bridge not an overbridge?  •  June 28, 2013, 4:52pm  •  1 vote

My point is not about the accuracy of either term, just that neither is is in common use in the majority of the English speaking world. It does seem that in NZ the civil engineers are quite fond of s

Re: I’ve vs I’ve got  •  June 28, 2013, 4:44pm  •  0 vote

@WW Point taken. :-))

Re: Same difference  •  June 27, 2013, 11:09pm  •  0 vote

Compare "seven minus five" and "twenty minus eighteen". Same difference. :-))

Re: I’ve vs I’ve got  •  June 27, 2013, 10:59pm  •  0 vote

Please excuse the typos. Should read "I have no quibble" "I've got to go".

Re: I’ve vs I’ve got  •  June 27, 2013, 10:57pm  •  0 vote

I have not quibble with use of "I've" but I do prefer "I have" to "I've got", and certainly "I have to go" is preferable to "I've to go" and "I've got to got".

Re: I’ve vs I’ve got  •  June 27, 2013, 10:53pm  •  0 vote

There is an extensive discussion of this here:- http://painintheenglish.com/case/4549

Re: “make a decision” or “take a decision”  •  April 29, 2013, 5:01pm  •  0 vote

@WW As I said in my opening post, I favour "make a decision", but I don't think "take a decision" is wrong. It just sounds a little unnatural to me. I'd never heard it used during my 35 years in Sco

Re: You’ve got another think/thing coming  •  April 13, 2013, 1:30am  •  1 vote

I too am an older person, fast approaching my three score and ten. It's always been "you have another think coming" any time I've heard it. In fact as a kid I heard it almost daily. :-))

Re: “Harsh but true” vs “harsh but fair”  •  April 9, 2013, 1:51pm  •  0 vote

@WW Private Messages

Re: “Harsh but true” vs “harsh but fair”  •  April 8, 2013, 4:24pm  •  0 vote

@WW I'd like to have a chat with you outside PITE. I have subscribed to Random Idea English via Blogger.com as Hairy Scot but I have as yet not discovered how to exchange PMs. Perhaps you could c

Re: “Harsh but true” vs “harsh but fair”  •  April 2, 2013, 12:52pm  •  0 vote

@WW SNAP!! Very close to the examples I quoted.

Re: “deal to”  •  March 28, 2013, 5:57pm  •  0 vote

@WW I have oft commented on what I refer to as "antipodean oddities", or perhaps "antipodean idiosyncrancies" would be a better term. One that has lately caught my attention is a growing tendency fo

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  March 11, 2013, 8:14pm  •  3 votes

Teacher in a South African school asks class, "What is wrong with the following sentence? ''There is ten cows in the field' " Jannie answers, "Perhaps one are a bull." :-))

Re: “deal to”  •  March 4, 2013, 12:11pm  •  0 vote

@WW Oddity is the spice to life? :-))

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  March 2, 2013, 1:21pm  •  0 vote

@WW Been taking lessons from DAW? :-)) Words like aberration and erroneous are maybe a little over the top, and I probably do have a tendency toward viewing things in black and white. Perhaps

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  March 1, 2013, 4:55pm  •  0 vote

@WW In the first 35 years of my life, which I spent in Scotland, I never once heard "different to" being used, although it did crop up now and then in films and some TV programs. So it was certainly

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  March 1, 2013, 12:15pm  •  0 vote

@WW OK, I will rephrase that. In my opinion "different to" belongs in that category. In fact, these "authorities" are also merely expressing opinions. Just about everyone in my generation, and

Re: Correct preposition following different? Redux  •  February 28, 2013, 7:56pm  •  0 vote

@ Joshing Certainly not! I was merely quoting examples of "wrong usage" vs /"correct usage" where I feel that the "wrong usages" have come about through failed attempts to sound clever and/or dif

Re: “gift of” vs. “gift from”  •  February 27, 2013, 3:03pm  •  0 vote

Between you, me, and the gatepost, I agree with mshades and WW.

Re: “Me neither.” or “Me either”  •  February 16, 2013, 12:29pm  •  0 vote

@WW I agree. It is plain that we are on the same plane! :-))

Re: hanged vs. hung  •  January 25, 2013, 2:21pm  •  0 vote

@WW Not so much a thing about hung, more about illustrating the differences between hung and hanged. I remember during the 60s a Scottish folk singer, as part of his intro to a song about Timothy Ev

Re: hanged vs. hung  •  January 25, 2013, 3:23am  •  0 vote

This little tale illustrates one of the few times when hung can be used when referring to a person:- Tam the local drunk is draped over the bar in his local when the door opens and this figure wear

Re: Impact as a noun  •  January 17, 2013, 1:22pm  •  0 vote

@WW During my career in IT we had a similar thing going at a couple of companies where I was employed. During meetings we would keep a score of buzzwords, initialisms, acronyms, etc. Strangely enou

Re: “get in contact”  •  January 17, 2013, 1:15pm  •  0 vote

@WW Thanks. Made my day. :-))

Re: Impact as a noun  •  January 15, 2013, 1:10pm  •  0 vote

@WW I'm with you 100% on that. I will admit that I used to take a somewhat pedantic view, never to the extent of yelling "wrong", but there were lots of things I considered "cringeworthy". Since jo

Re: optimiSe or optimiZe ?  •  January 14, 2013, 9:05pm  •  2 votes

The push for "ize" is obviously a plot by Scrabble players. :-))

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  January 13, 2013, 1:30am  •  0 vote

@WW I noticed when I worked in Germany in the seventies that the majority of my German friends and colleagues very rarely used any contractions when speaking English. "I will" or "I shall" was muc

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  January 12, 2013, 6:15pm  •  0 vote

@WW There was a wee clue in the bottom left hand corner, but I guess you must have missed it. Maybe Dyske can incorporate smilies when he has a spare weekend. :-)) :-)) :-)) :-))

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  January 12, 2013, 3:04pm  •  0 vote

Just as a point of interest: the use of "must" instead of "have to" or "should" is very common in South African English, especially with those who speak both English and Afrikaans. Probably due in so

Re: “in regards to”  •  January 12, 2013, 2:56pm  •  0 vote

I'd normally plump for "regarding" in most cases, although "as to" would probably do the trick too, however after reading a couple of Anwulf's posts I've developed a liking for "anent".

Re: Pronunciation of indefinite article “a”  •  January 12, 2013, 2:43pm  •  0 vote

@WW You could add "Breakfast/brekfast" to that list.

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  January 12, 2013, 2:37pm  •  0 vote

@WW While I do strive to avoid the use of "I have got" or even "I've got", I must admit that I do occasionally slip up! Just goes to show that nobody's perfect. :-))

Re: One of the most...  •  January 11, 2013, 10:26pm  •  0 vote

Back in the 70s a teacher friend asked her class to write down examples of a variety of "incongruities" common in the use of English. The list included "hanging prepositons" and "split infinitives".

Re: “I’ve got” vs. “I have”  •  January 11, 2013, 9:57pm  •  0 vote

I'd have thought this one would have petered out by now, 22 months and still going strong! Redundant or not, the use of "got" is certainly not incorrect, but I still feel that in a number of contex

Re: One of the most...  •  January 9, 2013, 10:17pm  •  0 vote

I tend to use both depending on context. "That is one of your more annoying habits" "That was one of the most awkward moments in my career"

Re: “as long as” vs. “so long as”  •  January 9, 2013, 10:12pm  •  1 vote

"She is not so pretty as I expected" sounds a little stilted to me. "She is not as pretty as I expected" seems more natural.

Re: “my” vs. “mine” in multiple owner possessive  •  January 9, 2013, 10:00pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will "Mine" is only used on its own, not before a noun: What about "mine host"? :-))

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 5, 2013, 11:54am  •  0 vote

Thanks Skeeter. Even after 30 years away from Scotland I probably still don't have that. :-)) I still don't pronounce the 'r' in law.

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 5, 2013, 11:42am  •  0 vote

@WW RP?

Re: Preferred forms  •  January 4, 2013, 11:26am  •  0 vote

Reading the latest Baldacci offering and have just come across another "alternate" form of a common phrase:- "I could care less" instead of "I couldn't care less". If it were not for American TV,

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