Hairy Scot

Joined: January 31, 2011

Number of comments posted: 461

Number of votes received: 198

Expat Scot now living in NZ. Home town was Greenock. Achieved SCE(H) levels in a number of subjects. Was employed by a multi-national company so spent a fair bit of time in other parts of Europe. Moved to South Africa in 1981 and then to NZ in 2007.

Questions Submitted

Alternate Prepositions?

Mentee?

“admits to”

Pronunciation of “gill”

“You have two choices”

Selfie

Horizontal Stripes?

in that regard

“deal to”

Preferred forms

intend on doing?

“in regards to”

“it caught on fire”

“Liquid water”?

“get in contact”

“As per ....”?

-age words

Perpendicular

Stood down

Signage

Recent Comments

Re: Why so many different spellings for some Arabic terms?  •  October 19, 2014, 5:25pm  •  0 vote

Thanks Will. ;)

Re: While vs Whilst vs Whereas  •  August 8, 2014, 7:58pm  •  0 vote

What about although?

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  August 1, 2014, 10:18pm  •  0 vote

@WW On a lighter note; if it were not for the phrase "raining cats and dogs" we would not have the glorious shaggy dog story about spare parts for Datsuns. :-)

Re: obstinacy vs. obstinancy  •  July 31, 2014, 9:26pm  •  0 vote

If it's in the OED then that's enough for me!

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 20, 2014, 5:38pm  •  0 vote

Grammar, like so much in the English language, is very often more about opinions than rules. I am sure that even noted grammarians differ on many aspects of it. That being so, it is no surprise that

Re: When did contacting someone become reaching out?  •  July 20, 2014, 5:18pm  •  0 vote

Apologies for the errant apostrophe in my previous post. Dyske, can we please have an edit function?

Re: When did contacting someone become reaching out?  •  July 20, 2014, 5:16pm  •  0 vote

@WW "Beat you to it HS" Indeed. I should have performed a more diligent search. I never heard that particular phrase during my time in the IT business, although I do agree that area of business

Re: Who/whom, copular verbs, and the infinitive  •  July 18, 2014, 1:08am  •  1 vote

To paraphrase a much misquoted line:- "I don't know much about grammar, but I know what I like". :-))

Re: Are proverbs dying?  •  July 3, 2014, 10:04pm  •  0 vote

I would have thought that "A watched kettle never boils" would have been more common than the "pot" version. Perhaps "Watched pot never gets smoked" would be more appropriate today.

Re: “As per ....”?  •  June 23, 2014, 9:18pm  •  0 vote

@WW Thank you. :-))

Re: Using country name as an adjective?  •  June 21, 2014, 10:38pm  •  0 vote

@Chris B Apparently FIFA issued a directive that commentators should use Côte d'Ivoire, but I too prefer Ivory Coast. Then we can call the people Ivory Coasters.

Re: Use my brain or brains?  •  June 17, 2014, 12:44am  •  1 vote

I would think that "use your head" would be more commonly used than either of the brain versions. But maybe that's a Scottish thing.

Re: Are sports commentators and sports show anchors out to change the language?  •  June 12, 2014, 1:04am  •  0 vote

@WW Listening to antipodean sports commentators and sport show anchors is very often like hearing fingernails on a blackboard. At least the utterances of David Coleman, Eddie Waring, and Sid Wadde

Re: “Anglish”  •  June 12, 2014, 12:59am  •  0 vote

"[English] gets you ahead." should perhaps be "[English] gets you head."

Re: Are sports commentators and sports show anchors out to change the language?  •  June 9, 2014, 7:43pm  •  0 vote

@WW Thanks for the interesting and informative post. :)

Re: Are sports commentators and sports show anchors out to change the language?  •  June 6, 2014, 2:24am  •  0 vote

My favourite Colemanball is "And Coe just opened his legs and showed his class!"

Re: Meaningless Use of “key”  •  June 6, 2014, 2:21am  •  0 vote

@WW I am pleased to be for once in line with a "noted luminary". :) It just seems to me that we are seeing more and more of this kind of verbal shorthand a

Re: co- = subordinate vs. co = equals  •  June 4, 2014, 9:08pm  •  0 vote

One that I find irksome is coleader(s) or even co-leader(s). To me joint leader seems more natural but perhaps to some it may conjure up a somewhat different image.

Re: Meaningless Use of “key”  •  June 4, 2014, 8:54pm  •  0 vote

No problems with the use of key as an adjective preceding a noun in phrases such as "a key component" or even "a key venue". Where it is annoying is in phrases like "that is key" or "stamina is key"

Re: Are sports commentators and sports show anchors out to change the language?  •  May 26, 2014, 12:34am  •  0 vote

" jayles the ungreedy May 26, 2014, 12:31am @HS Yes indeed. I am mighty curious as to how you arrive at your own point of view" Just one of life's little mysteries I suppose.

Re: Are sports commentators and sports show anchors out to change the language?  •  May 25, 2014, 9:44pm  •  0 vote

@jayles There is change and there is bastardisation. Just depends on one's point of view I suppose. @Jasper "Welcome along to match of the day" is one that springs to mind. Just heard a coupl

Re: “advocate for” or just “advocate”?  •  May 23, 2014, 12:37am  •  0 vote

@BGriffin My apologies, I failed to notice the typo. The "to" which precedes recycle is obviously redundant.

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  May 19, 2014, 5:25pm  •  0 vote

@WW Quoting examples like these:- "Nigel Farage's UKIP are on the verge of winning a Scottish seat" - The Daily Record "Ukip are the pro-Europeans' most dangerous weapon"- The Telegraph "Ukip are

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 19, 2014, 3:42pm  •  0 vote

@WW I would draw your attention to this statement from a previous post:- "What I do question, however, is when somebody repeatedly calls something which is absolutely standard in British English, co

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 19, 2014, 12:46am  •  0 vote

@jayles One of the advantages of being a Scot transplanted in NZ via South Africa is that I can support multiple teams when the RUWC comes around:- Scotland, The Springboks, The ABs, any team play

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 18, 2014, 11:26pm  •  0 vote

Just a thought on the issue of "proof". Does quoting an opinion that agrees with your opinion constitute proof? Does quoting possibly isolated usage of certain words and phrases in famous works or b

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  May 18, 2014, 11:18pm  •  0 vote

Headline from The Daily Express:- "European elections are almost here - and Ukip are threatening to rewrite the electoral map" ??????????

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 18, 2014, 12:58am  •  0 vote

@Jasper If I have used something that is a rule of AmEnglish it is only because it matches what I believe to be a rule of BrEnglish, or at least what I was taught was a rule of BrEnglish. I will fre

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 18, 2014, 12:51am  •  0 vote

@jayles I have used Ngram on occasion and have found that the percentage usage shown for UK English is pretty much on the side of the angels. :-)) In fact it is on Ngram graphs tha

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 17, 2014, 11:36pm  •  0 vote

@jayles Lost me there I'm afraid, or are you saying that I am intent on "crucifying the opposition"? I assure you that is not the case. However I will stick to my opinions, and if subjected to pers

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  May 17, 2014, 10:46pm  •  0 vote

A pride of lion was seen in the clearing. A murder of crows was seen in the field. A covey of pheasant was raised by the dogs. Or should all of those be were?

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 17, 2014, 10:42pm  •  0 vote

@jayles PS I'm sure that you are not suggesting that any contributors to PITE should/could be considered pricks. :-))

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 17, 2014, 10:40pm  •  0 vote

@jayles At the risk of being thought facetious; your last post reminded me of a quip made when Barclay's Bank in South Africa became First National Bank of South Africa and chose a thorn tree as it

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 17, 2014, 7:48pm  •  0 vote

@WW If the sole point of debate on grey areas is victory, then OK, you win. I very much doubt we shall have many more debates, for me the fun is in the chase not in the kill. Perhaps you should

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 17, 2014, 4:03pm  •  0 vote

@WW "I do find this attitude that you are right and that just about everyone who has written about British English is wrong exasperating" I do not maintain that they are wrong, I merely question the

Re: “advocate for” or just “advocate”?  •  May 17, 2014, 1:07am  •  0 vote

May I use "advocating" without "for"? You not only may, you must. The government has been advocating that the community to recycle more.

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 14, 2014, 11:36pm  •  0 vote

I see that WW was holding forth the same theories last year:- http://painintheenglish.com/case/4394

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  May 14, 2014, 11:34pm  •  0 vote

England invades Scotland once again, or is it England invade Scotland once again? Very confusing.

Re: Team names — singular or plural  •  May 14, 2014, 11:32pm  •  0 vote

@WW Scotland are playing England?? Taking things a bit far there methinks. Falling into the commentators' trap. Does that mean that Scotland are a nice country?

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 14, 2014, 1:54am  •  0 vote

@jayles Thanks for your insight. :)

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 13, 2014, 9:50pm  •  0 vote

@jayles I attended school in Scotland from 1951 until 1963. From 1968 till 1981 I worked for an international company and during that period I had a lot of interaction with with Americans and Europe

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 13, 2014, 5:02pm  •  0 vote

@WW It would seem that things have changed since I attended school. One of those shifts or phases of evolution which are used to justify the adoption of changes to the language. Either that or my m

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 13, 2014, 4:20am  •  0 vote

PS As the title of this topic states "I couldn't care less."

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 13, 2014, 4:19am  •  0 vote

@WW Some interesting distinctions there, and some a bit difficult to swallow. With all due respect to yourself and the luminaries you quote, I'd favour the simple approach and go one way or the othe

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 12, 2014, 3:47pm  •  0 vote

@WW So you're telling me that the following are correct? "The crowd are on their feet" "The government are convinced" "The herd are lowing" "The RBS are closed" "The East India Company were a fa

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 12, 2014, 2:18am  •  1 vote

@jayles I suppose the reason they taught that collective nouns take a singular verb was because that was what they had been taught and what the text books said. To be honest, does "that herd of cows

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 11, 2014, 11:16pm  •  0 vote

@Jayles A somewhat cynical view which I may well have adopted at various points during my education. However, in the long run, I can only express gratitude to the many harried souls who strove to po

Re: thus, therefore and hence are different  •  May 11, 2014, 8:50pm  •  0 vote

I was shot in the leg, hence my limp. I think therefore I am, I think. Thus was the wrath of the lord visited upon Sodom and Gomorrah.

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  May 11, 2014, 8:48pm  •  1 vote

@jayles Nice one!

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  May 11, 2014, 8:47pm  •  0 vote

@WW Your Slough joke reminded me of the one about the young Geordie (native of Newcastle upon Tyne for our non-UK readers) corporal at Yorkes Drift. On being awakened by a distant drumming noise he

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 11, 2014, 5:52pm  •  0 vote

@WW While I do have reservations about some aspects of American English, there are many areas where our transatlantic cousins do get it right. You can post as many examples of misuse as you choose,

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 10, 2014, 8:27pm  •  0 vote

@WW Anent your last post; I'd say that the House of Lords and Dalrymple got it wrong in each of those examples. I've never heard a plural verb used with a company or a bank. I'd also maintain that

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 10, 2014, 6:36pm  •  0 vote

@Funslinger Layed?

Re: fewer / less  •  May 9, 2014, 3:02am  •  1 vote

@jayles I think most of us would agree on that. The issue seems to be the use of less with a 'countable' noun.

Re: “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”?  •  May 7, 2014, 11:13pm  •  0 vote

I have heard the terms 'matriculate' and 'matriculant' used in connection with Senior Secondary or High Schools. But that sounds dreadful to my ear. In the UK firms would advertise for applicants hol

Re: Alternate Prepositions?  •  May 7, 2014, 9:27pm  •  0 vote

@WW I admire the quixotic zeal with which you defend minority positions. :-)) Just heard another "alternate preposition" on Fox Sports News. Interviewer asked "Is the player in risk?". There

Re: fewer / less  •  May 7, 2014, 5:39pm  •  0 vote

@WW "Which is also perhaps why 'fewer' can sometimes sound awkward to some people" There are also occasions when 'less' sounds awkward. I'd submit that there is a place for both words and that it i

Re: “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”?  •  May 7, 2014, 5:33pm  •  0 vote

PS The correct form is of course "graduate from". :-))

Re: “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”?  •  May 7, 2014, 5:32pm  •  0 vote

@providencejim Hi, as WW says, I do have a number of foibles, one of which is a tendency to tongue in cheek statements. If I have offended you, I do apologise. In the UK graduation is almost exclu

Re: fewer / less  •  May 6, 2014, 7:51pm  •  0 vote

@WW Is the distinction between less and fewer and number and amount not similar to that between much and many? "too much bacon" "too many eggs"

Re: “graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”?  •  May 6, 2014, 12:13am  •  0 vote

In the real world one graduates from university. Completing the required terms at a high school or college does not equate to a graduation.

Re: Couldn’t Care Less  •  May 6, 2014, 12:12am  •  0 vote

If you think I could care less you have another thing coming. :-))

Re: fewer / less  •  May 6, 2014, 12:09am  •  0 vote

I often wonder if idiomatic is sometimes being confused with idiotic. :-)) To me the distinction between less and fewer makes sense. (Now WW will be thinking "Expected nothing else from

Re: Alternate Prepositions?  •  May 2, 2014, 12:51am  •  0 vote

Found the graphs:- http://stancarey.wordpress.com/2011/04/20/different-from-different-than-different-to/ I was mistaken about the marked increase in the 1960s. There was a slight increase.

Re: Alternate Prepositions?  •  May 1, 2014, 11:31pm  •  0 vote

@WW I seem to have upset you, and for that I apologise. The stats to which I refer were in fact gleaned from a post that you made some time ago and I will endeavour to retrieve that post. That post

Re: Alternate Prepositions?  •  April 30, 2014, 9:55pm  •  0 vote

@WW "Endeavour" was in fact where I heard "what do you make to". As for "the age old debate"; there are many who believe, as I do, that the use of "different to" is an affectation adopted by a con

Re: Plural of Yes  •  April 24, 2014, 1:09am  •  0 vote

Let's get back to Yea and Nay. The plurals are easier. :-))

Re: Isn’t the word “feminism” itself gender-biased?  •  April 21, 2014, 9:59pm  •  0 vote

Is feminine logic really an oxymoron? :-))

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  April 21, 2014, 9:56pm  •  0 vote

My interest is more with the pronunciation. I remain unconvinced that fetus is the correct pronunciation for fœtus. It seems such a waste of two good vowels. And how did Phœnicia escape the dreaded

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  April 18, 2014, 11:46pm  •  0 vote

@Liverwort "As typewriters came into common use, I can't see how the mechanical versions would allow letters to overlap." Special characters perhaps? Have German typewriters not handled umlauts f

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  April 16, 2014, 7:19pm  •  0 vote

@WW Looking at it logically, which is perhaps the wrong approach with English, there seems to be no sense in coupling an 'e' with an 'a' or an 'o' just to get a long 'e' sound. That the 'e' is meant

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  April 15, 2014, 8:55pm  •  0 vote

As for pronunciation of æ and œ, I wonder if the modern tendency toward an 'e' sound is in fact correct. Perhaps an altered 'a' and 'o' similar to the pronunciation of 'ä' and 'ö' in German might be

Re: Have diphthongs gone for good?  •  April 15, 2014, 8:35pm  •  0 vote

@WW I've always used the f sound when pronouncing diphthong. My earliest recollection is of my English master trumpeting it while spelling "onomatopoeia". :-))

Re: Computer mouses or computer mice?  •  April 14, 2014, 7:38pm  •  0 vote

Pointing devices? :-))

Re: Mentee?  •  April 14, 2014, 7:36pm  •  0 vote

@jayles "drowning point"!!! Luv it!!! I retired a few years ago after 40 years in IT, or DP as it was when I started. :-)) This article brought back some memories:- http://arstechni

Re: Mentee?  •  April 14, 2014, 4:41pm  •  0 vote

@jayles Would target not serve just as well as pointee? :-)) Your comment reminded me of an occasion when some colleagues and I devised what we called a Glescaranto Precompil

Re: Mentee?  •  April 14, 2014, 12:22pm  •  0 vote

@jayles Thanks for that link. A most interesting blog. Could/Would/Should the mentor/mentee logic be applied to hector?

Re: Natural as an adverb  •  April 14, 2014, 1:12am  •  0 vote

"The Harry Redknapp Book of English as Spoken in The East End of London" lists these other examples:- :-)) "We don

Re: Natural as an adverb  •  April 14, 2014, 1:11am  •  0 vote

"The Harry Redknapp Book of English as Spoken in The East End of London". :-)) Lists these other examples:- "We done brilliant." "He played magnificent." Don't sound right, do they?

Re: Mentee?  •  April 13, 2014, 6:25am  •  0 vote

@WW Of course it's a personal thing. It's an opinion! As for employees being assigned to mentors; those are called apprentices. ;)

Re: Mentee?  •  April 8, 2014, 12:39am  •  1 vote

@jayles Serve for what? OED lists 1965 as earliest use. However, regardless of its age, it's a dreadful word. :-))

Re: Which sound “normal” to you?  •  April 7, 2014, 7:49pm  •  1 vote

Perhaps "Aw f**k, not fish again!" would be the most common reaction. :-)) Of the four options you list I'd go for A with D a close second, although I do feel that "have to have" sounds a bit

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 9:30pm  •  1 vote

@jayles You have obviously never watched a TV broadcast of a rugby or cricket match with Aussie commentators. Fingernails on chalkboards do not even come close. :-))

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 7:22pm  •  0 vote

@jayles Just to be clear; my question was not intended as a criticism of those who are not native English speakers. It was more of a dig at our antipodean cousins. :) In the case of Indian c

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 29, 2014, 5:48pm  •  0 vote

@WW PCNSN = Politically Correct Nanny State Nazis

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 28, 2014, 11:42pm  •  0 vote

@jayles As WW will confirm, as I am a pedantic old fart, I rarely need guidance. Mana, whether or not it be from heaven, doesn't really help. Let's not get into a discussion on the PC world. I am

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 28, 2014, 5:11pm  •  0 vote

I'm actually surprised this item was published. I submitted what I thought was a far more interesting question about the same time as this one and it has yet to appear. :-(

Re: Pronunciation Etiquette—Hypothetical Question  •  March 28, 2014, 5:09pm  •  0 vote

@WW "But much more important - how did you manage to get bullet points into your question?" I'm not quite sure. I don't recall using them when I entered the post.

Re: What does “Curb your dog” mean?  •  March 18, 2014, 10:13pm  •  0 vote

WRT kerbing The OED has this:- a. The act of furnishing with a kerb. b. The stones collectively forming a kerb. 1869 Daily News 2 Feb., The granite kerbing on the sea wall. 1884 E. O'Do

Re: What does “Curb your dog” mean?  •  March 18, 2014, 9:16pm  •  0 vote

@jayles We also have them in Kiwiland, though I did see a sign outside a car accessory store that read "Curbed your mags?", so it looks like confusion reigns in places other than North America. :-

Re: Proper use of st, nd, rd, and th — ordinal indicators  •  March 16, 2014, 10:59pm  •  0 vote

There would seem to be no hard and fast definition of how dates should be written and I suppose that writing Jan 1 conveys the same message as January 1st. However when I hear someone say "January on

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 13, 2014, 10:33pm  •  0 vote

@jayles I'm probably being a little thick today but could you please expand on your last post? Does it mean that "We have a meeting on Monday" is more common than "We have a meeting Monday"

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 13, 2014, 3:20pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper I'm not saying your explanation is incorrect. It's just that although there is nothing grammatically wrong with "we have a meeting Monday" or "on tomorrow .................." both sound st

Re: Pronouncing “str” like “shtr” as in “shtrong” “shtrange”  •  March 12, 2014, 10:47pm  •  1 vote

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/33500869/Gif/moustache.jpg

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 12, 2014, 9:16pm  •  0 vote

Hadn't thought of it that way, but I must confess I do have my doubts. Mind you, I am a pedantic old sceptic. :-))

Re: On Tomorrow  •  March 12, 2014, 6:49pm  •  0 vote

To me "on tomorrow" does sound strange, especially in American English where prepositions and conjunctions do sometimes seem to be out of favour and are frequently dropped. eg: "We will have a meetin

Re: “How is everything tasting?”  •  March 12, 2014, 6:43pm  •  2 votes

@Erroll I'm with you. "How's everything?" or "Everything OK" do seem to be more appropriate than "How's everything tasting?". @Gustav Same problem exists in German.

Re: “admits to”  •  March 12, 2014, 2:24pm  •  0 vote

@Skeeter Lewis I'd say "he confessed to committing the offence" and even "he admitted committing the offence" both sound more natural than "he admitted to committing the offence". But perhaps it's

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 12, 2014, 10:46am  •  0 vote

@Jasper Au contraire, I am willing to change my mind if convinced. I'm just hard to convince. :-)) Plus I do like to play devil's advocate now and then. As for "do the math"; should it n

Re: “You have two choices”  •  March 12, 2014, 4:23am  •  0 vote

Please ignore the last line of my previous post. Some garbage that I forgot to delete.

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