sundy

Joined: February 27, 2014

Number of comments posted: 13

Number of votes received: 0

No user description provided.

Recent Comments

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 11:18am  •  0 vote

@Brus - You rewrite my sentence by scattering a few commas around in it: "the subjunctive is the ultimate polish, which, once mastered, allows the user the right finally to claim that he has learned t

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  March 1, 2014, 10:15am  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will - If I'm not so sure about my course of action I'd use 'could, may' or 'might', but not 'would' Agree that most people would do this, but not all, especially when accompanied with the

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 9:46pm  •  0 vote

@Brus - the subjunctive is the ultimate polish which once mastered allows the user the right finally to claim that he has learned the language. In order to learn the language, it seems to me there

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 9:03pm  •  0 vote

Brus - the subjunctive is the ultimate polish which once mastered allows the user the right finally to claim that he has learned the language. Should it be "which (is) once mastered"? Can you maste

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 8:51pm  •  0 vote

@Sundy - Though I would have to agree that your interpretation works in your proposed context, but that's not an usual context. Keep in mind that I have said this already. If I say "If I was the

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 8:20pm  •  0 vote

I meant: would" works as well in 'If I won the lottery, I'd buy a new house', in which "would" implies that there is less possibility of buying a new house as other factors may come into play.

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 8:18pm  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will - Well, we would in British English at least. I know Americans don't use present perfect as much as us, but if it's a real condition, you'd (they'd) still use 'will' in the result clause

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 6:53pm  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will - My point, though, is that Unreal past (subjunctive, for those who prefer it) is exactly the same as Real Past for all verbs except one, and for only two persons of that one verb, 1st a

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 6:26pm  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will - "If I won the lottery, I'd buy a new house" - can you put a different interpretation on that? Yes. Assume this context: You were so tired and went to bed last night before the lo

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 2:44pm  •  0 vote

You go on the street and ask the ordinary people how they would feel if somebody says he /she can’t remember if he/she was the prime minister before. People would say: “it’s a bit wired. I would never

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 2:20pm  •  0 vote

@ Brus - "I used to be prime minister, you know". Does this mean "I" can't remember I was prime minister? No, it just means that I am not the prime minister, but I used to be. @ Brus - Well, Su

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 28, 2014, 12:27pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will - of course you're right, which is why, in EFL, we refer to this as the Unreal past. We only have to compare it with any other verb - 'If he acted like that at my party, I'd throw him out

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  February 27, 2014, 1:06pm  •  0 vote

@goofy If I was the Prime Minister, I would change the law. If I were the Prime Minister, I would change the law. Don't both of these sentences refer to unreal present events? If I can't remember i