Peter Reynolds

Joined: February 22, 2014

Number of comments posted: 11

Number of votes received: 4

No user description provided.

Recent Comments

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  April 30, 2014, 5:45pm  •  0 vote

But if you're an American "he" you'd be more likely to say "thaaat's me!" than either "this is he" or "this is him" so the days of women saying the female equivalent of either are probably numbered?

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 27, 2014, 5:49am  •  0 vote

Recently I met a Ukrainian family. The wife is of Polish Jewish extraction, as were a whole couple of villages where everybody had the same two Polish Jewish surnames. This family live in Odessa and

Re: Pronunciation of “often”  •  February 25, 2014, 5:13pm  •  0 vote

@ Warsaw Will What I am really getting at is that if I buy a phonics book for one of my children (such as Letterland's Beyond ABC) it is going to have pronunciations of individual elements in it tha

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  February 25, 2014, 5:07pm  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will - here's a screenshot - I find Google Books inter-country restrictions infuriating too - in my case they affect my access to 19th century material from Britain that is definitely out of

Re: What is the word for intentionally incorrect spelling?  •  February 24, 2014, 3:31pm  •  0 vote

It seems that the term "Sensational Spelling" goes back to at least 1964 - http://books.google.co.uk/books?id=YdgsQQnkmHAC&pg=PA129&dq="sensational+spelling"&hl=en&sa=X&ei=rqsLU4XKGIWy7Abe1YDIBQ&ved=0

Re: Pronunciation of “often”  •  February 24, 2014, 3:20pm  •  0 vote

Loch is the Scottish spelling, lough the Irish. Plough is the British spelling, plow the American - also British further back, as in at least some British printings of the Authorised (King James) ver

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 24, 2014, 3:07pm  •  0 vote

@Jasper Don't worry about it. I'm not worrying (and I have before on the odd occasions when I've genuinely fallen out with folk on other forums). On this occasion I felt it was more of a misunder

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 24, 2014, 8:33am  •  0 vote

Now I'm confused. I'm sorry I came across as superior. I don't think I was really comparing "this is she" "with "this is her" - I would be unlikely to hear either except when phoning USA. If I hear

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 24, 2014, 7:11am  •  0 vote

@Jasper "ignorant judgment of another person" - only unaware of how some women on another continent speak - if a British woman spoke like that she'd have to be a very odd one - and I *have* had some

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 22, 2014, 6:26pm  •  2 votes

Excuse me Jasper but this thread started with the sentence "A common example is the phrase “This is she.” used to answer a telephone." I am not discussing the pros and cons of "This is she" and "Th

Re: “This is she” vs. “This is her”  •  February 22, 2014, 1:27pm  •  2 votes

In my experience of phoning US customers "This is she" is an Americanism spoken by women only - i.e. the corresponding "this is he" does not exist. In Britain we'd say "that's me", or "speaking", or