Jasper

Joined: June 9, 2012

Number of comments posted: 173

Number of votes received: 29

No user description provided.

Recent Comments

Re: “There can be only one” or “there can only be one”?  •  July 21, 2013, 5:12pm  •  0 vote

@Helcio Fernandes, Actually, I reflected upon this question recently and concluded the same thing (only as an adjective, that is).

Re: Chary  •  July 15, 2013, 6:29am  •  0 vote

Oh look, a troll.

Re: Five eggs is too many  •  July 9, 2013, 12:15am  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will, Ah, I forgot about numerical S-V agreement. And that is only if you see the eggs as a single unit, I just don't see 'five eggs' as being a unit. However, just adding something makes i

Re: Five eggs is too many  •  July 6, 2013, 5:13am  •  2 votes

I would have to agree with Tim33 on the first part. But I must ask why would person A ask 'how many' and then switch to saying 'too much'? On the second part, 'Five eggs are too many' is correct becau

Re: Past tense of “text”  •  June 20, 2013, 2:23pm  •  0 vote

*Remove the 'are'.

Re: Past tense of “text”  •  June 20, 2013, 2:23pm  •  0 vote

@Really?? We're are not ignorant of the rules of English, but the question is whether the word 'text' should follow the conjugation of regular verbs or irregular verbs.

Re: LEGOs — Is the Plural form of LEGO incorrect?  •  June 15, 2013, 8:34pm  •  0 vote

@Captain Typo, First, Lego's demands that people use Lego bricks is ignorant of the fact that only a small fraction of the pieces are, in fact, bricks. There is an array of pieces that does not inc

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 11, 2013, 2:30pm  •  0 vote

Whoops, the fallacy that if only a few people know or believe in something, then it is right.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 11, 2013, 2:29pm  •  0 vote

Jayles is just stating a fallacy, the appeal to popularity, yet he makes another fallacy of his own, one that I call the appeal to obscurity, the fallacy that it is known by a few that it is right.

Re: Pled versus pleaded  •  May 8, 2013, 8:06am  •  1 vote

@AnWulf Why do have the need to bash and get rid of Latin and French words? Wouldn't that leave English bereft of its musicality. I don't care if you wish to add Anglo-Saxon (Old English) words int

Re: When “that” is necessary  •  April 27, 2013, 6:22pm  •  0 vote

@Warsaw Will, I am not Jayles. And on the note of that not being an adverbial subordinator, my Warriner's grammar book says that subordinators of purpose are "that, so that, and one other that slip

Re: Word in question: Conversate  •  April 27, 2013, 6:15pm  •  2 votes

@smitty No one cares.

Re: When “that” is necessary  •  April 16, 2013, 3:08pm  •  0 vote

"That" can be a demonstrative pronoun or a relative pronoun. When "that" acts as a relative pronoun, it is usually a part of a noun clause or a restrictive adjective clause. Finally there are cases wh

Re: One of the most...  •  January 10, 2013, 3:20am  •  0 vote

Yes, I don'r consider those as errors either. But most prescriptivists in the hierarchy do.

Re: One of the most...  •  January 9, 2013, 4:16pm  •  0 vote

Actually, considering that errors is being compared to more than one, it should be most, i.e. splitting infinitives, stranding prepositions, etc. Comparison of three or more things is superlative ther

Re: Misplaced clauses?  •  January 2, 2013, 4:31am  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will, What kind of linguist books do have? I wish to get a few extra English books.

Re: Misplaced clauses?  •  January 1, 2013, 9:52pm  •  0 vote

Thank you, Warsaw Will.

Re: intend on doing?  •  January 1, 2013, 3:44am  •  0 vote

Happy New Year, Warsaw WIll and everyone else! Anyway, I found this for "Intend on", which appears to be a colloquialism: http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/intendon.html However, I don't

Re: intend on doing?  •  December 31, 2012, 9:25am  •  0 vote

Whoops, your not you're.

Re: intend on doing?  •  December 30, 2012, 11:56pm  •  0 vote

Although I would not say it sounds wrong, its grammar, which is what you're issue is, is odd, but I think has something to do with "doing". I think in this phrase "doing" is a gerund with gerundial ob

Re: concerning  •  December 24, 2012, 6:27pm  •  0 vote

Denkof Zwemmen, Is your outcry because of concerning being a preposition? The dictionary program on my computer lists concerning as a preposition. But in the case of 'causing concern', I think that

Re: my being vs me being  •  November 29, 2012, 9:39pm  •  0 vote

What about "warned"? I have a hard time accepting "warned" as an object or predicate adjective of "being". Couldn't the prepositional phrase: "me/my being warned", constructed as an independent clause

Re: Medicine or Medication?  •  November 6, 2012, 2:00pm  •  0 vote

On Porter's lyrics, I think was merely to maintain a rhyme with word that has a similar meaning. However, I object to transportation and documentation being used in place of transport and document. I

Re: Verb-tense agreement for a quote that is still true  •  November 6, 2012, 6:28am  •  0 vote

On Porter's lyrics, I think was merely to maintain a rhyme with word that has a similar meaning. However, I object to transportation and documentation being used in place of transport and document. I

Re: American versus British question  •  October 23, 2012, 5:30pm  •  0 vote

Hairy Scot, http://images.wikia.com/bloons/images/8/83/How-about-no.jpg

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 10, 2012, 9:32pm  •  1 vote

I found this article helpful: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/aue/bring.html

Re: Complete Sentence  •  October 10, 2012, 8:04pm  •  0 vote

theshockdoctrin, The verb is "delivered" but the subject is unclear. I would rephrase it as so: "In the years following the Oslo Accords, they (who exactly?) delivered on their promise of tradi

Re: “Bring” vs. “Take” differences in UK and American English  •  October 9, 2012, 5:19am  •  0 vote

I want to say it is because the two words are so similar. Both are talking about movement and the movement of things. I don't have any sources as to how it happened, but maybe an extremely popular boo

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 7, 2012, 11:50am  •  0 vote

Yes, I did that just because I wanted to compress the phrase "the person whom". However, in the context, whomever sounds very weird to me. On that note, I try not hypercorrect myself; I don't actually

Re: Exact same  •  October 6, 2012, 5:00pm  •  1 vote

This may help: http://public.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/exact.html

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 1, 2012, 6:31pm  •  0 vote

Oops, in the example (center): (that person)/(she/he/they/etc.).

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 1, 2012, 6:20pm  •  0 vote

In subjective complement forms: She is Mary= Mary is She. So by extrapolating that method: So that's who he is looking for = so who he's looking for is that. By taking this nonsensical statement into

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 1, 2012, 3:13pm  •  0 vote

Thanks Warsaw Will, I believe that, when in a nominal clause, the case of who/whom is based (when it's an object, preposition, or, in this instance, a subjective complement) on the internal structu

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  October 1, 2012, 7:13am  •  1 vote

Hey, Warsaw Will, Would you mind helping me this problem: "So that's (who/whom) he's looking for"? I got a new book and was searching around for the same thing you got from your book ('I who

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 28, 2012, 10:59am  •  0 vote

No one is trying to get rid of singular and plural. I, and some others, just want "their" to have an exception to the rule.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 5:03pm  •  0 vote

I didn't say that I didn't believe in language families; don't put words in my mouth. I'm not saying that there aren't correlations within language families that allow for translatibility. I don't, ho

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  September 27, 2012, 2:19pm  •  1 vote

"...and English grammar needs to correspond with that of most of these other languages..." Why? Why must English have to follow the rules of other languages? Is because you don't see English as a l

Re: “Anglish”  •  September 26, 2012, 11:02am  •  0 vote

Personally, I think that adding Anglo-Saxon words would be great only if it is not at the expense of already enmeshed vocabulary. Most of word selection is preferential. I think having an alternative

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  September 11, 2012, 2:21pm  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will, Could you provide a link to your find?

Re: Not just me who thinks... or Not just me who think... or Not just I who think... or Not just I who thinks...  •  September 1, 2012, 8:48pm  •  1 vote

For the first, well, if we add "Is it" to "Not just me who thinks", then, in a formal setting, yes to "I". In an informal setting, "me" is fine. In the second, which I'm not too sue about, it's not

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 28, 2012, 5:58pm  •  1 vote

Brus, I think you mistook me for being part of your and Warsaw Will's argument. I was just commenting on the question. What I had stated, adding still, was in response to "once was Prime Minister".

Re: “If I was” vs. “If I were”  •  August 27, 2012, 10:35am  •  0 vote

I'd simply add the word still: "If I were still the Prime Minister, ..."

Re: Whom are you?  •  August 23, 2012, 3:04pm  •  0 vote

Warsaw Will, I apologize for acting a little contentious and acerbic. I completely agree that in speech rules like who/whom don't matter. And I wouldn't say "It is me" and "He is bigger than me" ar

Re: When “one of” many things is itself plural  •  August 19, 2012, 8:58pm  •  0 vote

I know this is a 'dead thread', but I believe the problem lies with the subject and object. The current subject: "language rules set in stone" has an adjective and participial phrase, making rules the

Re: always wanted to be  •  August 15, 2012, 4:36pm  •  0 vote

"J. K Rowling always wanted to be an author." ~ (Simple Past) A simple statement about her want before current time. We could also read into it and think she is now an author. "J. K Rowling had al

Re: “and” or “but” followed by a comma  •  August 15, 2012, 11:23am  •  0 vote

Porsche, are you perhaps British because I've seen British authors use the semicolon before but and the comma after it?

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 12, 2012, 2:41pm  •  0 vote

I use ensure and I'm an American. And I like the sound of fiat; however, I haven't had the pleasure of using it too much. Also, if you had looked at Warsaw Will's link and scroll down, you would have

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 11:36am  •  2 votes

D. A. Wood, "I also proudly write American English, and "thusly" is quite a useful word here. If you don't like it, don't complain about it." Look hypocrisy! He says don't complain about it when

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  August 11, 2012, 12:11am  •  0 vote

D. A. Wood, You're not being specific nor are you being germane. I feel that you just like to hear yourself ramble on and on and on and on until you've droned out anyone who thinks dissimilarly to

Re: me vs. myself  •  July 27, 2012, 12:29pm  •  0 vote

Like is a preposition, and by that logic, the pronoun should be in the objective case ("me") not the subjective case ("I").

Re: Pronouncing “gala”  •  July 26, 2012, 7:12am  •  0 vote

Anwulf, what's the book about?

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 7:48pm  •  0 vote

Jeremy, I, somewhat, concur.

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 25, 2012, 12:54pm  •  1 vote

D. A. Wood, all I said was that nouns can be used as adjectives. I prefer American English over U. S. English.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 25, 2012, 1:56am  •  0 vote

Actually, Perfect Pedant, that was simple mistake on my part. You should clearly have understood that it was mistake. You can't tell me that all of your posts and writing come out flawless. I am prett

Re: Latest vs. Newest  •  July 24, 2012, 3:37pm  •  0 vote

Nouns can be used as adjectives.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 24, 2012, 3:24pm  •  0 vote

D. A. Wood, In correct, formal grammar everyone and everybody are singular subjects and if we followed it precisely to the dot everyone/everybody and they/them/their would never occur. If you quest

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 24, 2012, 11:06am  •  0 vote

Brus, The slippery slope argument relies on fallacious logic.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 24, 2012, 10:48am  •  1 vote

Oops: "...that is why they/them/their is used." That should be "shouldn't be used."

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 24, 2012, 10:00am  •  1 vote

Brus, Everybody is a singular subject and so takes on a singular verb that is why they/them/their is used; there is whole case load of pronouns you would think should take a plural verb but don't.

Re: Use of “their” as a genderless singular?  •  July 24, 2012, 5:50am  •  0 vote

I'm sorry but using they, them, and their when referring to an genderless singular is not a bad thing, except maybe to prescriptivists. Consulting my Warriner: "In conversation, you may find it mor

Re: The opposite of “awaken”?  •  July 2, 2012, 9:01pm  •  0 vote

Well, it provides a 'verbification' format like ennoble (from, the noun, noble) which allows to get a new word for sleep also: slaf. Although it wasn't my intention to do that, it works. And plus, I d

Re: The opposite of “awaken”?  •  June 30, 2012, 12:43am  •  0 vote

I know this is old, but I rather like enslaffen, which is derived from the German word Einschlafen.

Re: Acronym-verb agreement  •  June 10, 2012, 8:25am  •  0 vote

It should be singular; however, that only depends if you're talking about the organization as an organization or if the people who comprise of the organization.

Re: Shall have done?  •  June 10, 2012, 7:59am  •  0 vote

My teacher told me that should/could/would also denote the future tense and with the addition of have, the future perfect. Should is used for first person and would for second and third persons and co

Re: One of the most...  •  June 9, 2012, 8:11pm  •  0 vote

I think it has to do with the fact that most is a superlative and not a comparative, as is more. Adjectives, and adverbs, have three forms: the positive (the base word), the comparative, and the super

Re: “It is what it is”  •  June 9, 2012, 12:03pm  •  0 vote

'It is what it is' is sentence with a noun clause (what it is).

Re: that vs. if and whether  •  June 9, 2012, 11:41am  •  0 vote

I would say 'if that' because 'that' is relative pronoun that introduces a noun, adjective, or an adverb clause. When it's an adverb clause, it means a purpose or result, while 'if' is used for condit

Re: Whom are you?  •  June 9, 2012, 11:30am  •  1 vote

@Warsaw Will, Although you might find it stilted, 'whom does the new tax proposal really benefit' is correct. If we change the interrogative into the declarative (with emphatic verb form): 'the new

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