May 16, 2011  •  Pam Kline

wrong, incorrect, bad

I am currently teaching English in Spain and one of my students asked me a question that has left me dumbfounded. How would someone explain the differences between: Wrong/Right Incorrect/Correct Bad/Good I know what sounds good, but I haven’t been able to find a hard and fast rule.

May 11, 2011  •  Windy Road

Usage rules for adverbs

An article I was writing recently came back to me with this suggested edit: “commitment to proactively address the issues” was changed to “address proactively the issues.” This grates on my ear, and I’m interested in this forum’s insights. My quick research suggests that adverbs usually follow “be” verbs, but there are complicated usage rules for other than “be” verbs, and in many cases, adverbs correctly come before the verb.

May 3, 2011  •  Thảo

Common vs. Commonplace

What is the difference between “common” and “commonplace”? In which situation can I replace “common” by “commonplace”?

April 24, 2011  •  sigurd

Is “nevermore” a real word?

Is “nevermore” a real word? Can it be used in “ordinary” writing? I’m wondering because it seems to be the only word that means ‘never again’, and it would be nice to have a concise word.

April 18, 2011  •  BobH

Over-use of periods

Has anybody else noticed a trend in the over-use of periods? I’ve seen it a lot in advertizing and the like. I’m not talking about an elipsys (...), I’m referring to when periods are over used, so as to fragment a sentence, or used where perhaps bulleted words/sentances should be used. Periods are also over-used in the likes of phone numbers now where hyphens were once used, thus making it look something like a computer network IP address. (Dot Com revolution maybe? ...Don’t know.) Anyway, it just looks like pop cuture gimmicks--it just looks rediculous.

April 14, 2011  •  sigurd

The opposite of “awaken”?

Is there an English word that means ‘to fall asleep’? Since there’s a word, ‘awaken’, that denotes ‘to wake up’, I’m wondering if ‘awaken’’s antonym exists.

April 11, 2011  •  lef

and so...

I seem to have developed a writing tick of using “and so” rather than “therefore” or “accordingly.” I like the flow of “and so,” but I have been discouraged from using it. I’m curious about what others think of “and so.”

April 10, 2011  •  Thảo

want it that way

I need you help explain this structure to me: “prefer/want it that way”. I have heard it the first time in the song “I want it that way” of Backstreet Boys. But I think the complete sentence could be: “I want it in that way”, is it right? Is “in” left out in this sentence? Thank you in advance.

April 8, 2011  •  michael owan

I dove my hat

What is the meaning of “I dove my hat”?

March 22, 2011  •  Hairy Scot

“I’ve got” vs. “I have”

Is there not a redundancy in the use of “got” with “have”? Why say “I have got” or “I’ve got” when “I have” conveys the exact meaning? The same would be true of its use in the second or third person.

March 20, 2011  •  Steph

The taller of her and...

In the sentence “Karen is the taller of her and Lin”, why is the pronoun ‘her’ used (as opposed to ‘she’)? I would have thought that, since Karen is the subject of the sentence, the appropriate pronoun would be ‘she’? This sentence comes out of the Institute of Professional Editors Accreditation Exam, so I can only assume that it is correct. Thanks to anyone who can help!

March 18, 2011  •  Dyske

It’s Official: email not e-mail

The AP Stylebook today announced that electronic mail is now spelled without a hyphen: email. Finally. I personally haven’t used “e-mail” in about a decade. We have a thread here on this topic of how to properly spell email. http://painintheenglish.com/case/4463 At the time, I commented that it may take another 10 years for this to settle, but it took less than a year!

March 9, 2011  •  pebbles

Past Perfect vs. Past Tense

The following sentence is taken from Advanced English CAE:  Within seconds Barry, who was wearing enormous rubber boots, had tied a rope to the front bumper of the car and was pulling it out with the tractor. I’d say:  Within seconds Barry, who was wearing enormous rubber boots, tied a rope to the front bumper of the car and pulled it out with the tractor.  Any opinions?

March 9, 2011  •  joham

“I recommend that you do not” vs. “I recommend you not”

I recommend that you do not take this pill. I recommend that your wife does not take this pill. I recommend that you not take this pill. I recommend that your wife not take this pill. Are all four sentences correct English? Do many native American/British English speakers use verb forms like in the first two sentences?

March 7, 2011  •  sigurd

Rules for -ise and -ize

How does one know exactly when a word is supposed to end with -“ise” vs -“ize” in Oxford spelling?

February 19, 2011  •  pje

to-day, to-night

I have seen to-day and to-night used in literature up to the 1920′s. When and why did this become obsolete?

February 15, 2011  •  sigurd

i’s vs “i”s

I’ve dotted the i’s and crossed the t’s.I’ve dotted the “i”s and crossed the “t”s. Which of the foregoing examples is correct?

February 10, 2011  •  alysondraper

gifting vs. giving a gift

When did we stop “giving” presents, and instead started to “gift” presents?  I was taught that “gift” was a noun and not a verb, but it appears it is now used as the preferred verb to indicate the giving of a gift.

February 10, 2011  •  alysondraper

“graduated high school” or “graduated from high school”?

Is it really proper to say “I graduated high school,” or should it not be, “I graduated from high school?” Previously, I thought only rednecks were able to “graduate high school.”

February 9, 2011  •  dbfreak

cannot vs. can not

The first spelling/grammatical mistake I always see, even in journals is the spelling for cannot. Cannot must be one word, just like today and tomorrow! But, I see so many can nots!! You can still grammatically use can not in some contexts, like Can you not shake your leg when I’m in the room? You can just not shake, ok? -> You can not shake it. As in, you can choose to not shake it rather than you being unable, incapable of shaking! But that’s not the context they use in those darn journals!

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