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My question is about the verb “to sift”. I know that I can sift flour, cocoa powder and all sorts of solid cooking ingredients. My question is: Can I sift liquids? Let’s say I make some homemade orange juice and want to take the pulp out of it. Do I sift my juice? If I don’t, what do I do to it? Help me! : )

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You strain it.

semiotek February 16, 2012, 9:33am

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Please repeat after me:

I Do Not Sift Juice! I Will Not Sift Juice! I Have Never Sifted Juice! :-)

You can filter the pulp out. You could possibly strain, but that is reserved for cases when you start with a thicker mash. If you started with a thick mash of crushed tomato or pineapple, you would strain out the juice.

But if it a liquid with a little bit of pulp, you filter.

Mike K March 10, 2012, 2:18pm

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"If people make mistakes on the Internet, Google will find them."

Similarly, the internet allows the uninformed and lazy to wander in. For the not-too-lazy my google shows that many educated writers in English have used "sift the juice". But, if it's all too much for you, don't strain yourself.

John Gibson February 27, 2012, 1:48am

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Being sure I'd heard it before, I Googled "sift the juice". And there are lots of examples. Quoting from the first one:

"Peel and slice golden pippins, according to what quantity of jelly is required ; boil them to a marmalade with a little water, and a lemon sliced, and sift the juice ..."

John Gibson February 20, 2012, 8:30am

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If people make mistakes on the Internet, Google will find them.

nigel February 25, 2012, 2:25pm

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Yes     No