Submitted by jennifer  •  March 9, 2005

Login into or log in to

I’m damn confused about this... Can anybody tell me which is the right way to say?

“I am sorry to hear that you have trouble with login into our website.”

or

” I am sorry that you have trouble with log in to our website.”

I feel both are wrong. If so, what is the right way to say this?

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RE: log on vs. log in,
I couldn't begin to say why, but I tend to think of logging on as establishing an actual network or internet connection, e.g. dialup, or, as was mentioned in the old days, connecting to a time-shared mainframe with dumb terminals. If your not logged on, your terminal is a paperweight. You're not ON the network or ON the system at all. I think of logging IN as providing a username and password to get access to a particular area; a website, a shopping cart, some secure locality, etc. You can be ON, but not IN.
I won't swear to it, but I think you'll find this to be often true in common usage.

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You guys are all off. Unless the website has some sort of authentication requiring users to enter a username/password, i.e. to log in, then the proper term is "connecting" and not "logging in". Also, it's assumed the site is on the web, "website" is a bit redundant.

"I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble connecting to our site."

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Who said otherwise? Logging in infers entering a user name and password.

As for site vs. website, I don't think that website is reduntant. Ever log in to an FTP site?

While I'm at it, log into vs. log in to:
I'll disagree with Eric and say that "in to" is correct. The predicate is "log in" not "log".

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Hmm, edit would be nice....

That should be "username" not "user name" :)

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I log on.

You login.

He/She/It logs in or into or on, as the case may be

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I believe you can log on or login. Try "I'm sorry you're having trouble logging into/onto our website"

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I'm sorry I logged in, logged on, logged into, logged onto, found myself logging in, logging on, logged in, logged onto this web site, site, Web site, World Wide Web site, network location at all

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Yeah, both sound clumsy.

A better rendering would be, "I am sorry to hear that you have trouble logging in to our website."

If "login" (n) must be used, "I am sorry to hear that you have trouble with the login to our website" seems better.

It's the ambiguous nature of that word "login" that makes it awkward -- it's a noun made up of a verb, and since its a new word, that kinda confused people when they hear it, I think.

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I think "I'm sorry to hear that you have trouble logging into our website" sounds ok...

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The reason the first sentence sounds awkward is because you didn't use and article with "login," and that normally in English, articles are used with singular nouns.

The reasn the second sentence is grammarically incorrect is becuase you're using "log" as a verb here when you need a noun. Therefore, "logging," which is the gerund form of "log," would be more correctly used here.

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You're probably going to want to use:

"I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble logging in to our website."

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Correct: "I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble with logging into our Web site."

"Web" is capitalised because it comes from "World Wide Web," which is a proper noun.

"into" is proper here. Please don't use "in to."

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Actually "Web site" is falling out of common usage and has merged into the uncapitalized word "website". Either way is still considered correct.

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Am I just old, or didn't we used to say "log on" to a network rather than "log in?"

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Same here, Speedwell. In fact, we used to use the "sign on" term, back in the mainframe era.
What I think is more critical here is the use of the "in to" Vs. "into". Similarly, is it "on to" Vs. "onto". This reminds me of, yet, another similar issue. When one gives someone a direction, . . . . turn left on Main street. Other may say, turn left onto Main street.
Well, sorry there Jennifer, didn't actually help you, instead added more issues.

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I still hear people use "sign on" and "log on" very often, usually interchangeably with "log in," "login," and "sign in."

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Thank you guys! It was very helpful. :)

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Not difficult at all.

I'm sorry that our website has caused you any inconvenience, and that you have experienced difficulty with the login process.

I'm not sure if "Jennifer" was having problems with login versus log in, but both are wrong in that context.

It should be logging in, and since loggingin sounds ridiculous, I would say that log in is preferable to login.

However, to complicate things further, login is more a pronoun, whereas log in is more a verb.

One logs in using ones login name.

Stupid language!!!

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When you log on you are on the system. When you log in you are in; inside a particular area.

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I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble logging in to our website."

What is the problem with this statement??????????

I am sorry to hear that you are having trouble logging in to our website."

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